Cambridge Catalogue  
  • Your account
  • View basket
  • Help
Home > Catalogue > Music, Sound and Space
Music, Sound and Space

Details

  • 16 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 376 pages
  • Size: 247 x 174 mm
  • Weight: 0.8 kg
Add to basket

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521764247)

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

US $99.00
Singapore price US $105.93 (inclusive of GST)
Music, Sound and Space
Cambridge University Press
9780521764247 - Music, Sound and Space - Transformations of Public and Private Experience - Edited by Georgina Born
Frontmatter/Prelims

Music, Sound and Space

Music, Sound and Space is the first collection to integrate research from musicology and sound studies on music and sound as they mediate everyday life. Music and sound exert an inescapable influence on the contemporary world, from the ubiquity of MP3 players to the controversial use of sound as an instrument of torture. In this book, leading scholars explore the spatialisation of music and sound, their capacity to engender modes of publicness and privacy, their constitution of subjectivity, and the politics of sound and space. Chapters discuss music and sound in relation to distinctive genres, technologies and settings, including sound installation art, popular music recordings, offices and hospitals, and music therapy. With international examples, from the Islamic soundscape of the Kenyan coast, to religious music in Europe, to First Nation musical sociability in Canada, this book offers a new global perspective on how music and sound and their spatialising capacities transform the nature of public and private experience.

Georgina Born is Professor of Music and Anthropology at the University of Oxford. Formerly Professor of Sociology, Anthropology and Music at the University of Cambridge, she is currently directing the international research programme ‘Music, Digitisation, Mediation: Towards Interdisciplinary Music Studies’, funded by the European Research Council. Her publications include Rationalizing Culture: IRCAM, Boulez, and the Institutionalization of the Musical Avant-Garde (1995), Western Music and Its Others: Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music (edited with D. Hesmondhalgh 2000), Uncertain Vision: Birt, Dyke and the Reinvention of the BBC (2005) and the forthcoming Interdisciplinarity: Reconfigurations of the Social and Natural Sciences (edited with A. Barry).


Music, Sound and Space

Transformations of Public and Private Experience

Edited by

Georgina Born


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo, Delhi, Mexico City

Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521764247

© Cambridge University Press 2013

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2013
Printed and bound in the United Kingdom by the MPG Books Group

A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication data

Music, sound and space : transformations of public and private experience / edited by Georgina Born.
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-521-76424-7 (hardback)
1. Music–Social aspects. 2. Sound–Social aspects. I. Born, Georgina.
ML3916.M879 2013
781.2′3–dc23
2012027131

ISBN 978-0-521-76424-7 Hardback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


Contents

List of figures
vii
List of tables
viii
List of music examples
ix
Notes on contributors
x
Acknowledgements
xiv
1         Introduction – music, sound and space: transformations of public and private experience
Georgina Born
1
Part I    The design of mediated music and sound
71
2         Sound installation art: from spatial poetics to politics, aesthetics to ethics
Gascia Ouzounian
73
3         Music, space and subjectivity
Eric F. Clarke
90
4         What the mind’s ear doesn’t hear
Jonathan Sterne
111
5         Tuning the human race: athletic capitalism and the Nike+ Sport Kit
Sumanth Gopinath and Jason Stanyek
128
Part II   Space, sound and affect in everyday lifeworlds
149
6         Music and the construction of space in office-based work settings
Nicola Dibben and Anneli B. Haake
151
7         Broadcasting the body: the ‘private’ made ‘public’ in hospital soundscapes
Tom Rice
169
8         Islam, sound and space: acoustemology and Muslim citizenship on the Kenyan coast
Andrew J. Eisenberg
186
Part III  Music, identity, alterity and the politics of space
203
9         Music inside out: sounding public religion in a post-secular Europe
Philip V. Bohlman
205
10        Classical music and the politics of space
Nicholas Cook
224
11        Civil twilight: country music, alcohol and the spaces of Manitoban aboriginal sociability
Byron Dueck
239
Part IV   Music and sound: torture, healing and love
257
12        Music space as healing space: community music therapy and the negotiation of identity in a mental health centre
Tia DeNora
259
13        Towards an acoustemology of detention in the ‘global war on terror’
Suzanne G. Cusick
275
14        Faith, hope, and the hope of love: on the fidelity of the phonographic voice
Richard Middleton
292
Bibliography
312
Discography
343
Index
344

Figures

6.1         A typical corridor leading to private offices in the research institute (photo © Anneli B. Haake, 2010)
154
6.2         A shared office in the research institute (photo © Anneli B. Haake, 2010)
155
6.3         View over the open-plan ground floor and balcony space in the architectural practice (photo © Anneli B. Haake, 2010)
155
9.1         Title page of G. E. Lessing, Nathan, der Weise (1779)
206
9.2         Berlin, Oranienburgerstraße Synagogue (Neue Synagoge; interior, dedication 1866) (London Ill. News)
211
9.3         Berlin, Oranienburgerstraße Synagogue (Emile de Cauwer, 1866)
212
9.4         Berlin, Oranienburgerstraße Synagogue (photo © Philip V. Bohlman, 2005)
213
9.5         Berlin, Neue Synagoge, paper cut-out model on postcard (2008)
214
9.6         Paul Böhm’s architectural design for the Cologne Mosque (Köln-Ehrenfeld)
215
9.7         Poster advocating the ban on minarets in Switzerland
221
9.8         ‘Der Himmel über der Schweiz ist gross genug’ (Iras Cotis)
222
10.1        Concert at the Santa Maria del Pi Church, Second Life, 12 April 2008
235
10.2        Concert at the Santa Maria del Pi Church, Second Life, 12 April 2008
235
12.1        BRIGHT musical space
263
12.2        The musical event (from DeNora 2003)
270
14.1        ‘Nobody’ by Bert Williams, original sheet music cover, 1905
309

Tables

3.1         Goldfrapp ‘Deer Stop’: schematic structure
105
3.2         ‘Quasi-phonetic’ transcription of the lyrics to ‘Deer Stop’
106

Music examples

14.1        Chorus of ‘Nobody’ (1905) by Alex Rogers and Bert Williams (transcribed from the Archeophone reissue of the 1906 recording by the author)
307

Contributors

Philip V. Bohlman FBA, is the Mary Werkman Distinguished Service Professor of the Humanities and of Music at the University of Chicago, Honorary Professor at the Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien, Hannover and Artistic Director of the New Budapest Orpheum Society. His publications include World Music: A Very Short Introduction (2002), The Music of European Nationalism: Cultural Identity and Modern History (2004), Jewish Music and Modernity (2008) and Focus: Music, Nationalism, and the Making of the New Europe (2010).

Georgina Born is Professor of Music and Anthropology at the University of Oxford. She is the author of Rationalizing Culture: IRCAM, Boulez, and the Institutionalization of the Musical Avant-Garde (1995) and Uncertain Vision: Birt, Dyke and the Reinvention of the BBC (2005), and co-editor of Western Music and Its Others (with David Hesmondhalgh 2000) and Interdisciplinarity: Reconfigurations of the Social and Natural Sciences (with Andrew Barry forthcoming). She directs the research programme ‘Music, Digitisation, Mediation: Towards Interdisciplinary Music Studies’, funded by the European Research Council.

Eric F. Clarke, FBA is Heather Professor of Music at the University of Oxford. He is the author of Ways of Listening: An Ecological Approach to the Perception of Musical Meaning (2005) and co-author of Music and Mind in Everyday Life (with Nicola Dibben and Stephanie Pitts 2010). He is co-editor of Empirical Musicology: Aims, Methods, Prospects (with Nicholas Cook 2004) and Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological and Cultural Perspectives (with David Clarke 2011).

Nicholas Cook is 1684 Professor of Music at the University of Cambridge and former Director of the AHRC Research Centre for the History and Analysis of Recorded Music (CHARM). His books include Music: A Very Short Introduction (1998), which has appeared in fourteen languages, and The Schenker Project: Culture, Race, and Music Theory in Fin-de-siècle Vienna (2007), which won the Society for Music Theory’s 2010 Wallace Berry Award. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and of Academia Europaea.

Suzanne G. Cusick is Professor of Music at New York University. Her writings appear in such journals as Early Music, Musical Quarterly, Perspectives of New Music and Journal of the Society for American Music. Francesca Caccini at the Medici Court: Music and the Circulation of Power (2009) received the 2010 book prize of the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. Her current work addresses the use of noise and music for interrogation in the ‘war on terror’, work for which she received in 2007 the Philip Brett Award of the LGBTQ Study Group of the American Musicological Society.

Tia DeNora is Professor of Sociology of Music at the University of Exeter. Her books are Beethoven and the Construction of Genius (1995), Music in Everyday Life (2000), After Adorno: Rethinking Music Sociology (2003) and Music in Action: Selected Essays in Sonic Ecology (2011). She recently completed a longitudinal research project on music and mental health and, with Dr Gary Ansdell, is preparing a three volume ‘Triptych’ on this work. With Gary Ansdell, she co-edits the Ashgate Series on Music & Change.

Nicola Dibben is Senior Lecturer in Music at the University of Sheffield and joint co-ordinating editor of Popular Music (Cambridge University Press). Her research addresses music, mind and culture, with a focus on the science and psychology of music and on popular music studies. She has published over forty journal articles and book chapters, is the author of Björk (2009) and co-author of Music and Mind in Everyday Life (2010). She also collaborated with Björk on the artist’s multimedia app album Biophilia (2011).

Byron Dueck is Lecturer in Music at the Open University. His research has encompassed indigenous music and dance in Canada, popular music in Cameroon and jazz performance in the UK; it is crossed by several themes including musical public cultures and the social implications of rhythm and metre. He is co-editor of Migrating Music (with Jason Toynbee 2011) and Experience and Meaning in Music Performance (with Martin Clayton and Laura Leante, forthcoming); and a monograph, Musical Intimacies and Indigenous Imaginaries, is forthcoming.

Andrew J. Eisenberg is Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Faculty of Music at the University of Oxford, where he is working on an ethnography of the Kenyan music industry as part of the European Research Council-funded ‘Music, Digitisation, Mediation’ research programme directed by Georgina Born. He holds concurrently a three-year Junior Research Fellowship at St Catherine’s College, University of Oxford. He has an article on youth music on the Kenyan coast forthcoming in the journal Africa.

Sumanth Gopinath is Assistant Professor of Music Theory at the University of Minnesota. He is currently working on two book projects, one on the global ringtone industry and another on the politics of race in the music of Steve Reich. He has also edited, with Jason Stanyek, the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies. His other research interests include post-Second World War (American) art and popular musics, cultural theory (especially Marxism), intersections of politics and music (or culture generally), and the globalisation of cultural production.

Anneli B. Haake is a researcher and music psychology consultant on music-listening. Her doctoral research into music in workplaces has been presented at international conferences and published in the journal Musicae Scientiae (2011). She has been awarded the ESCOM/ICMPC Young Researcher Award (YRA) and is also a reviewer for the Psychology of Music.

Richard Middleton FBA, is Emeritus Professor of Music at Newcastle University. He is the author of Pop Music and the Blues (1972), Studying Popular Music (1990), Voicing the Popular (2006) and Musical Belongings: Selected Essays (2009), editor of Reading Pop: Approaches to Textual Analysis in Popular Music (2000) and co-editor (with Martin Clayton and Trevor Herbert) of The Cultural Study of Music: A Critical Introduction (2003; revised edition 2012). He was a Founding Editor of the Cambridge University Press journal, Popular Music.

Gascia Ouzounian is Lecturer in the School of Creative Arts at Queen’s University Belfast. She is a musicologist, composer and violinist, and has performed in North America and Europe with such ensembles as the Silk Road Ensemble, Sinfonia Toronto and Theatre of Eternal Music Strings Ensemble. Her research focuses on experimental music and sound art, with particular interests in site-specific sound, sound installation art and intermedia composition. Her writings are published in Journal of the Society for American Music, Journal of Visual Culture, Computer Music Journal and Organised Sound.

Tom Rice is Lecturer in Social Anthropology at the University of Exeter. He held an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the University of Cambridge, during which time he co-organised the 2008 conference ‘Music, Sound, and the Reconfiguration of Public and Private Space’ from which this volume derives. His publications on ‘auditory anthropology’ appear in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Journal of Material Culture, The Senses and Society and The Sound Studies Handbook. His book Hearing the Hospital: Sound, Listening, Knowledge and Experience is forthcoming. His future research addresses the nature of prison soundscapes.

Jason Stanyek is University Lecturer in Ethnomusicology at the University of Oxford, where he is also Fellow and Tutor in Music at St John’s College. He is the author of numerous articles and of a forthcoming book on music and dance in the Brazilian diaspora. He co-edited The Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies (with Sumanth Gopinath) and Brazil’s Northern Wave: Fifty Years of Bossa Nova in the United States (with Frederick Moehn), both forthcoming.

Jonathan Sterne teaches in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University. His research focuses on sound and music, media technologies and the politics of culture. He is author of The Audible Past: Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction (2003), MP3: The Meaning of a Format (2012) and numerous articles in such journals as Social Text, New Media and Society, Ethnomusicology and Media, Culture and Society. He is the editor of The Sound Studies Reader (2012). Visit his website at http://sterneworks.org.




© Cambridge University Press
printer iconPrinter friendly version AddThis