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Innovation in Astronomy Education

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  • Page extent: 384 pages
  • Size: 247 x 174 mm
  • Weight: 0.84 kg
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 (ISBN-13: 9780521880152)

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  • Published July 2008

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Innovation in Astronomy Education

Cambridge University Press
9780521880152 - Innovation in Astronomy Education - by Jay M. Pasachoff, Rosa M. Ros and Naomi Pasachoff
Frontmatter/Prelims


INNOVATION IN ASTRONOMY EDUCATION

Astronomy leads to an understanding of the history and nature of science, and attracts many young people to education in science and technology. But while in many countries astronomy is not part of the standard curriculum, many scientific and educational societies and government agencies have produced materials and educational resources in astronomy for all educational levels. This volume highlights the general strategies for effective teaching and introduces innovative points of view regarding methods of teaching and learning, particularly those using new technologies. Technology is used in astronomy, both for obtaining observations and for teaching. The book also presents ideas for how astronomy can be connected to environmental issues and other topics of public interest. This valuable overview is based on papers and posters presented by many of the world’s leading astronomy educators at a Special Session of the International Astronomical Union General Assembly in Prague in 2006.

JAY M. PASACHOFF is Field Memorial Professor of Astronomy at Williams College, and was President of the Commission on Education and Development of the International Astronomical Union.

ROSA M. ROS is Professor of Mathematics at the Technical University of Catalonia in Barcelona and Vice-President of the International Astronomical Union’s Commission on Education and Development.

NAOMI PASACHOFF is a Research Associate at Williams College and an author of science textbooks and biographies of scientists.

Cover: The Astronomical Clock of Prague, one of the main tourist sites in this city that hosted the 2006 International Astronomical General Assembly, in which the Special Session on which this book is based was included. The clock shows the Sun’s position in the sky, the lunar phase, the zodiac, the positions of the Sun and Moon on the ecliptic, and other items of interest to astronomers. The oldest part of the clock dates back to 1410, though the clock’s current appearance comes from major repairs after World War II devastation. Moving statues, for which tourists gather on the hour, were added in the seventeenth century. (Richard Nebesky/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images)


Image not available in HTML version

Johannes Kepler’s heliocentric idea, from his Mysterium Cosmographicum (1596), that the planets’ spacing was determined by the Platonic solids. Kepler moved to Prague, the site of the International Astronomical Union’s 2006 General Assembly at which this Special Session on Innovation in Teaching and Learning Astronomy was held, to work with Tycho Brahe, leading to Kepler’s three laws of planetary motion. (Photo courtesy of Jay M. Pasachoff with the assistance of Wayne Hammond, Williams College’s Chapin Library.)


INNOVATION IN ASTRONOMY EDUCATION

JAY M. PASACHOFF
Williams College, Massachusetts, USA

ROSA M. ROS
University of Catalonia, Barcelona

NAOMI PASACHOFF
Williams College, Massachusetts, USA


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo, Delhi

Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521880152

© Cambridge University Press 2008

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception
and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements,
no reproduction of any part may take place without
the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2008

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalog record for this publication is available from the British Library

ISBN 978-0-521-88015-2 hardback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or
accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to
in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such
websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


Contents

Prefacepage xi
Part IGeneral strategies for effective teaching1
Introduction3
1Main objectives for the meeting on innovation in teaching/learning astronomy
Jay M. Pasachoff and Rosa M. Ros
11
2Learning astronomy by doing astronomy
John R. Percy
13
3Hands-On Universe – Europe (EU-HOU)
Roger Ferlet
23
4Life on Earth in the atmosphere of the Sun: a multimedia manual
E. V. Kononovich, T. V. Matvejchuk, O. B. Smirnova, G. V. Jakunina, and S. A. Krasotkin
27
5A model of teaching astronomy to pre-service teachers
Bill MacIntyre
32
6How to teach, learn about, and enjoy astronomy
Rosa M. Ros
39
7Clickers: a new teaching tool of exceptional promise
Douglas Duncan
48
8Educational opportunities in pro–am collaboration
Richard Tresch Fienberg and Robert Stencel
55
9Teaching history of astronomy to second-year engineering students at the University of Chile
José Maza
58
10Teaching the evolution of stellar and Milky Way concepts through the ages: a tool for the construction of a scientific culture using astrophysics
G. Theureau and L. Klein
62
11International Astronomical Union – education programs
Jay M. Pasachoff
70
12Astronomy in culture
Magda Stavinschi
75
13Light pollution: a tool for astronomy education
Margarita Metaxa
85
14Worldwide distance-learning university astronomy
Stewart Eyres, Barbara Hassall, and Ian Butchart
91
15Edible astronomy demonstrations
Donald Lubowich
98
16Amateur astronomers as public outreach partners
Michael A. Bennett
106
17Does the Sun rotate around Earth or does Earth rotate around the Sun? An important aspect of science education
Syuzo Isobe
110
18Using sounds and sonifications for astronomy outreach
Fernando J. Ballesteros and Bartolo Luque
113
19Teaching astronomy and the crisis in science education
Nick Lomb and Toner Stevenson
116
20Astronomy for all as part of a general education
J. E. F. Baruch, D. G. Hedges, J. Machell, K. Norris, and C. J. Tallon
122
21Cosmic deuterium and social networking software
Jay M. Pasachoff, Terry-Ann K. Suer, Donald A. Lubowich, and Tom Glaisyer
128
Poster highlights132
Astronomy in the laboratory
Bunji Suzuki
132
Crayon-colored planets: using children’s drawings as guides for improving astronomy teaching
Ana Beatriz de Mello, D. N. Epitácio Pereira, E. A. M. Gonzalez, R. V. Nader, and B. C. G. Lima
134
Challenges of astronomy: classification of eclipses
S. Vidojevic and S. Segan
135
Malargüe light pollution: a study carried out by measuring real cases
B. García, A. Risi, M. Santander, A. Cicero, A. Pattini, M. A. Cantón, L. Córica, C. Martínez, M. Endrizzi, and L. Ferrón
135
Simple, joyful, instructive: ignite the joy for astronomy
Yasuharu Hanaoka and Shinpei Shibata
138
Successive innovative methods in introducing astronomy courses
Tapan K. Chatterjee
139
The 2005 annular eclipse: a classroom activity at EPLA
Herminia Filgaira-Alcalá
139
The Armagh Observatory Human Orrery
M. E. Bailey, D. J. Asher, and A. A. Christou
140
What mathematics is hidden behind the astronomical clock of Prague?
Michal Krizek, Alena Solcová, and Lawrence Somer
142
Solar SystemPractical Exercises and AstronomyPractical Works for secondary scholars
Aleksandar S. Tomic
143
Astronomy in the training of teachers and the role of practical rationality in sky observation
Paulo S. Bretones and M. Compiani
143
Part IIConnecting astronomy with the public145
Introduction147
22The IAU Working Group on communicating astronomy with the public: status report
Dennis R. Crabtree, Lars Lindberg Christensen, and Ian Robson
151
23Astronomy outreach: informal education
Julieta Fierro
156
24Integrating audio and video podcasting into existing E/PO programs
Aaron Price
160
25The IAU’s communication strategy, hands-on science communication, and the communication of the planet definition discussion
Lars Lindberg Christensen
163
26Getting a word in edgeways: the survival of discourse in audiovisual astronomy
T. J. Mahoney
177
27A critical evaluation of the new Hall of Astronomy of the University of Mexico Science Museum
Silvia Torres-Peimbert and Consuelo Doddoli
183
28Revitalizing astronomy teaching through research on student understanding
Timothy F. Slater
189
29The TENPLA project (1): popularization of astronomy under cooperation between students and educators in Japan
M. Hiramatsu, K. Kamegai, N. Takanashi, and K. Tsukada
198
30The TENPLA project (2): activities for the popularization of astronomy
K. Kamegai, M. Hiramatsu, N. Takanashi, and K. Tsukada
199
Poster highlights203
An astronomer in the classroom: Observatoire de Paris’s partnership between teachers and astronomers
Alain Doressoundiram and Caroline Barban
203
Astronomy and space sciences in Portugal: communication and education
Pedro Russo and Mariana Barrosa
204
Gemini Observatory outreach
Maria Antonieta Garcia
204
Part IIIEffective use of instruction and information technology207
Introduction209
31ESO’s astronomy education program
Douglas Pierce-Price, Claus Madsen, Henri Boffin, and Gonzalo Argandoña
212
32US student astronomy research and remote observing projects
Mary Ann Kadooka, James Bedient, Sophia Hu, Rosa Hemphill, and Karen J. Meech
218
33A global network of autonomous observatories dedicated to student research
Richard Gelderman
226
34Remote telescopes in education: report of an Australian study
David H. McKinnon and Lena Danaia
233
35Visualizing large astronomical data holdings
C. Christian, A. Conti, and N. Gaffney
243
Poster highlights245
An educational CD-Rom based on the making of the Second Guide Star Catalogue
R. L. Smart, G. Bernardi, and A. Vecchiato
245
Astronomia.pl portal as a partner for projects aimed at students or the public
Krzysztof Czart and Jan Pomierny
245
Development of a remote cooperative observation system for telescopes with P2P agent network by using location information
Takuya Okamoto, Seiichi X. Kato, Yuji Konishi, and Masato Soga
247
Image processing for educators in Global Hands-On Universe
James P. Miller, C. R. Pennypacker, and G. L. White
248
The Pomona College undergraduate 1-meter telescope, astronomy laboratory, and remote observing program
B. E. Penprase
250
Part IVPractical issues connected with the implementation of the 2003 IAU resolution on the Value of Astronomy Education, passed by the IAU General Assembly, 2003251
Introduction253
36Stellar evolution for students of Moscow University
E. V. Kononovich and I. V. Mironova
258
37Astronomy for everybody: an approach from the CASAO/NAUH view
María Cristina Pineda de Carías
262
38Toward a new program in astronomy education in secondary schools in Turkey
Z. Aslan and Z. Tunca
272
39Universe awareness for young children: some educational aspects and a pilot project
Cecilia Scorza, George Miley, Carolina Ödman, and Claus Madsen
276
40Education in Egypt and Egyptian response to eclipses
Ahmed A. Hady
281
41Astronomy in the cultural heritage of African societies
Paul Baki
288
42Education at the Pierre Auger Observatory: movies as a tool in science education
Beatriz García and Cristina Raschia
293
43Freshman seminars: interdisciplinary engagements in astronomy
Mary Kay Hemenway
300
44Astronomy for teachers
Julieta Fierro
306
45Daytime utilization of a university observatory for laboratory instruction
John R. Mattox
310
Poster highlights315
Astronomy education in the Republic of Macedonia
O. Galbova and G. Apostolovska
315
L’Aula del Cel: communicating astronomy at school level
A. T. Gallego, A. Ortiz-Gil, and M. Gómez Collado
315
Gemini Observatory’s innovative education and outreach for 2006 and beyond
Janice Harvey
316
A history of astronomy teaching in Serbian schools
S. Vidojevic and S. Segan
317
News from the Cosmos: daily astronomical news web page in Spanish
Amelia Ortiz-Gil
317
Reproduction of William Herschel’s metallic mirror telescope
N. Okamura, S. Hirabayashi, A. Ishida, A. Komori, and M. Nishitani
318
History of Ukrainian culture and science in astronomical toponymy
Iryna B. Vavilova
321
The Universe: helping to promote astronomy
Rosa M. Ros and Javier Moldón Vara
321
Astronomy education in Ukraine, the school curriculum, and a lecture course at Kyiv Planetarium
N. S. Kovalenko, K. I. Churyumov, and E. V. Dirdovskaya
323
Conclusions324
Author index325
Index329

© Cambridge University Press


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