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Ship Resistance and Propulsion

Ship Resistance and Propulsion
Practical Estimation of Ship Propulsive Power

2nd Edition

$80.00 ( ) USD

  • Date Published: August 2017
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108340106

$ 80.00 USD ( )
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About the Authors
  • This second edition provides a comprehensive and scientific approach to evaluating ship resistance and propulsion. Written by experts in the field, it includes the latest developments in CFD, experimental techniques and guidance for the practical estimation of ship propulsive power. It addresses improvements in energy efficiency and reduced emissions, and the introduction of the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI). Descriptions have now been included of pump jets, rim driven propulsors, shape adaptive foils, propeller noise and dynamic positioning. Trial procedures have been updated, and preliminary estimates of power for hydrofoil craft, submarines and AUVs are incorporated. Standard series data for hull resistance and propeller performance are included, enabling practitioners to make ship power predictions based on material and data within the book. Numerous fully worked examples illustrate applications for most ship and small craft types, making this book ideal for practising engineers, naval architects, marine engineers and undergraduate and postgraduate students.

    • Allows the reader to understand and apply realistic, up-to-date methodologies to ship resistance and propulsion
    • Describes advanced techniques for analyzing the components of ship resistance and propulsion, allowing the reader to identify where reductions in power can be achieved
    • Includes extensive data and worked examples for analysis and powering performance prediction
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    Product details

    • Edition: 2nd Edition
    • Date Published: August 2017
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108340106
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction
    2. Propulsive power
    3. Components of hull resistance
    4. Model-ship extrapolation
    5. Model-ship correlation
    6. Restricted water depth and breadth
    7. Measurement of resistance components
    8. Wake and thrust deduction
    9. Numerical estimation of ship resistance
    10. Resistance design data
    11. Propulsor types
    12. Propeller characteristics
    13. Powering process
    14. Hull form design
    15. Numerical methods for propeller analysis
    16. Propeller design data
    17. Reductions in propulsive power and emissions
    18. Applications.

  • Authors

    Anthony F. Molland, University of Southampton
    Anthony F. Molland is Emeritus Professor of Ship Design at the University of Southampton. For many years, Professor Molland has extensively researched and published papers on ship design and ship hydrodynamics including propellers and ship resistance components, ship rudders and control surfaces. He also acts as a consultant to industry in these subject areas and has gained international recognition through presentations at conferences and membership of committees of the International Towing Tank Conference (ITTC). Professor Molland is the co-author of Marine Rudders and Control Surfaces (2007) and editor of the Maritime Engineering Reference Book (2008).

    Stephen R. Turnock, University of Southampton
    Stephen R. Turnock is Professor of Maritime Fluid Dynamics at the University of Southampton. Professor Turnock lectures on many subjects, including ship resistance and propulsion, powercraft performance, marine renewable energy, and applications of CFD. His research encompasses both experimental and theoretical work on energy efficiency of shipping, performance sport, underwater systems, and renewable energy devices, together with the application of CFD for the design of propulsion systems and control surfaces. He acts as a consultant to industry, and was on committees of the International Towing Tank Conference (ITTC) and International Ship and Offshore Structures Congress (ISSC). Professor Turnock is the co-author of Marine Rudders and Control Surfaces (2007).

    Dominic A. Hudson, University of Southampton
    Dominic A. Hudson is Shell Professor of Ship Safety and Efficiency at the University of Southampton. Professor Hudson lectures on ship resistance and propulsion, powercraft performance and design, recreational and high speed craft, and ship design. His research interests are in all areas of ship hydrodynamics, including experimental and theoretical work on ship resistance components, seakeeping and maneuvering, together with energy efficient ship design and operation. He was a member of the International Ship and Offshore Structures Congress (ISSC) Committee on Sailing Yacht Design and is a member of the 28th International Towing Tank Conference (ITTC) Specialist Committee on Performance of Ships in Service, having previously served on the ITTC Seakeeping and High Speed Craft Committees.

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