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The Evolutionary Emergence of Language
Social Function and the Origins of Linguistic Form

$54.00 ( ) USD

Derek Bickerton, Bart de Boer, Robbins Burling, Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy, Barbara L. Davis, Rory A. DePaolis, Jean-Louis Dessalles, Colin Fyfe, James R. Hurford, Simon Kirby, Chris Knight, David Lightfoot, Daniel Livingstone, Peter J. MacNeilage, Frederick J. Newmeyer, Jason Noble, Mark Pagel, Camilla Power, Michael Studdert-Kennedy, Marilyn M. Vihman, Robert P. Worden, Alison Wray
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  • Date Published: January 2005
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511030796

$ 54.00 USD ( )
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About the Authors
  • The Evolutionary Emergence of Language covers the origins and early evolution of language. Its main purpose is to synthesize current thinking on this topic, particularly from a standpoint in theoretical linguistics. It is suitable for students of human evolution, evolutionary psychology, linguistic anthropology and general linguistics. It is the outcome of a major international conference on the evolution of language and includes contributions from many of the best known figures in this field. Very few truly interdisciplinary volumes on this topic have previously been published.

    • Interdisciplinary appeal
    • Contributions from well-known authorities
    • Hot topic - Hurford et al.'s comparable book has sold over 1500 copies since 1998
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    ' … a useful introduction to the social conditions of language evolution.' McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2005
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511030796
    • contains: 68 b/w illus. 22 tables
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. The Evolution of Cooperative Communication:
    1. Introduction: the evolution of cooperative communication Chris Knight
    2. Comprehension, production and conventionalization in the origins of language Robbins Burling
    3. Co-operation, competition and the evolution of pre-linguistic communication Jason Noble
    4. Language and hominid politics Jean-Louis Dessalles
    5. Secret language use at female initiation: bounding gossiping communities Camilla Power
    6. Play as precursor of phonology and syntax Chris Knight
    Part II. The Emergence of Phonetic Structure:
    7. Introduction: the emergence of phonetic structure Michael Studdert-Kennedy
    8. The role of mimesis in infant language development: evidence for phylogeny? Marilyn M. Vihman and Rory A. DePaolis
    9. Evolution of speech: the relation between ontogeny and phylogeny Peter J. MacNeilage and Barbara L. Davis
    10. Evolutionary implications of the particulate principle: imitation and the dissociation of phonetic form from semantic function Michael Studdert-Kennedy
    11. Emergence of sound systems through self-organisation Bart de Boer
    12. Modelling language-physiology coevolution Daniel Livingstone and Colin Fyfe
    Part III. The Evolution of Syntax:
    13. The emergence of syntax James R. Hurford
    14. The spandrels of the linguistic genotype David Lightfoot
    15. The distinction between sentences and noun phrases: an impediment to language evolution? Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy
    16. How protolanguage became language Derek Bickerton
    17. Holistic utterances in protolanguage: the link from primates to humans Alison Wray
    18. Syntax without natural selection: how compositionality emerges from vocabulary in a population of learners Simon Kirby
    19. Social transmission favours linguistic generalization James R. Hurford
    20. Words, memes and language evolution Robert P. Worden
    21. On the reconstruction of 'proto-world' word order Frederick J. Newmeyer
    Epilogue
    22. The history, rate and pattern of world linguistic evolution Mark Pagel.

  • Editors

    Chris Knight, University of East London

    Michael Studdert-Kennedy, Haskins Laboratories

    James Hurford, University of Edinburgh

    Contributors

    Derek Bickerton, Bart de Boer, Robbins Burling, Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy, Barbara L. Davis, Rory A. DePaolis, Jean-Louis Dessalles, Colin Fyfe, James R. Hurford, Simon Kirby, Chris Knight, David Lightfoot, Daniel Livingstone, Peter J. MacNeilage, Frederick J. Newmeyer, Jason Noble, Mark Pagel, Camilla Power, Michael Studdert-Kennedy, Marilyn M. Vihman, Robert P. Worden, Alison Wray

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