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The Cambridge Handbook of Areal Linguistics

The Cambridge Handbook of Areal Linguistics

CAD$183.95 (R)

Part of Cambridge Handbooks in Language and Linguistics

Raymond Hickey, Lyle Campbell, Balthasar Bickel, Victor A. Friedman, Brian D. Joseph, Juliette Blevins, Thomas Stolz, Nataliya Levkovych, Harry van der Hulst, Rob Goedemans, Keren Rice, Maria Koptjevskaja Tamm, Henrik Liljegren, Johan van der Auwera, Daniël Van Olmen, Bernd Kortmann, Verena Schröter, Alan Timberlake, Sven Grawunder, Geoffrey Haig, Bernd Heine, Anne-Maria Fehn, Gerrit Dimmendaal, Jeff Good, Tom Güldemann, Rajend Mesthrie, John Peterson, Umberto Ansaldo, Martine Robbeets, Gregory D. S. Anderson, Hilary Chappell, N. J. Enfield, James Kirby, Marc Brunelle, Louisa Miceli, Alan Dench, Malcolm Ross, Paul Geraghty, Anthony P. Grant, Marianne Mithun, Patience Epps, Lev Michael, Pieter Muysken, Joshua Birchall, Rik van Gijn, Olga Krasnouhova, Neele Müller
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  • Publication planned for: May 2017
  • availability: Not yet published - available from May 2017
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107051614

CAD$ 183.95 (R)
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About the Authors
  • Providing a contemporary and comprehensive look at the topical area of areal linguistics, this book looks systematically at different regions of the world whilst presenting a focussed and informed overview of the theory behind research into areal linguistics and language contact. The topicality of areal linguistics is thoroughly documented by a wealth of case studies from all major regions of the world and, with chapters from scholars with a broad spectrum of language expertise, it offers insights into the mechanisms of external language change. With no book currently like this on the market, The Cambridge Handbook of Areal Linguistics will be welcomed by students and scholars working on the history of language families, documentation and classification, and will help readers to understand the key area of areal linguistics within a broader linguistic context.

    • Presents the first state-of-the-art body of research and findings in the new burgeoning field of areal linguistics
    • Offers a unique overview of many language families from an areal perspective, benefitting those working on the history of language families, documentation and classification
    • Amply documents the topicality of areal linguistics in chapters from a wide range of scholars, providing insights into the mechanisms of external language change
    • Presents a contemporary discussion of key notions such as 'linguistic area' and 'linguistic convergence and divergence', reviewing the argument for how language change can occur when languages becomes more or less similar in their structures
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: May 2017
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107051614
    • dimensions: 247 x 174 mm
    • contains: 83 b/w illus.
    • availability: Not yet published - available from May 2017
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    1. Areas, areal features and areality Raymond Hickey
    Part I. Issues in Areal Linguistics:
    2. Why is it so hard to define a linguistic area? Lyle Campbell
    3. Areas and universals Balthasar Bickel
    4. Reassessing sprachbunds: a view from the Balkans Victor A. Friedman and Brian D. Joseph
    5. Areal sound patterns: from perceptual magnets to stone soup Juliette Blevins
    6. Convergence and divergence in the phonology of the languages of Europe Thomas Stolz and Nataliya Levkovych
    7. Word prominence and areal linguistics Harry van der Hulst, Rob Goedemans and Keren Rice
    8. Semantic patterns from an areal perspective Maria Koptjevskaja Tamm and Henrik Liljegren
    Part II. Case Studies for Areal Linguistics:
    9. The Germanic languages and areal linguistics Johan van der Auwera and Daniël Van Olmen
    10. Britain and Ireland Raymond Hickey
    11. Varieties of English Bernd Kortmann and Verena Schröter
    12. Slavic languages Alan Timberlake
    13. The Caucasus Sven Grawunder
    14. Western Asia Geoffrey Haig
    15. An areal view of Africa Bernd Heine and Anne-Maria Fehn
    16. Areal contact in Nilo-Saharan Gerrit Dimmendaal
    17. Niger-Congo languages Jeff Good
    18. The Kalahari Basin area as a 'sprachbund' before the Bantu expansion Tom Güldemann and Anne-Maria Fehn
    19. South Africa and areal linguistics Rajend Mesthrie
    20. Jharkhand as a 'linguistic area' John Peterson
    21. Sri Lanka and South India Umberto Ansaldo
    22. The Transeurasian languages Martine Robbeets
    23. The changing profile of case marking in the northeastern Siberia area Gregory D. S. Anderson
    24. Languages of China in their East and Southeast Asian context Hilary Chappell
    25. Language in the mainland Southeast Asia area N. J. Enfield
    26. Southeast Asian tone in areal perspective James Kirby and Marc Brunelle
    27. The areal linguistics of Australia Louisa Miceli and Alan Dench
    28. Languages of the New Guinea region Malcolm Ross
    29. Languages of Eastern Melanesia Paul Geraghty
    30. The Western Micronesian Sprachbund Anthony P. Grant
    31. Native North American languages Marianne Mithun
    32. The areal linguistics of Amazonia Patience Epps and Lev Michael
    33. Linguistic areas, linguistic convergence, and river systems in South America Pieter Muysken, Joshua Birchall, Rik van Gijn, Olga Krasnouhova and Neele Müller.

  • Editor

    Raymond Hickey, Universität Duisburg–Essen
    Raymond Hickey is Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Duisburg and Essen, Germany. His main research interests are varieties of English (especially Irish English and Dublin English) and general questions of language contact, variation and change. Among his recent book publications are Motives for Language Change (Cambridge, 2003), Legacies of Colonial English (Cambridge, 2004), Dublin English: Evolution and Change (2005), Irish English: History and Present-day Forms (Cambridge, 2007), The Handbook of Language Contact (2010), Eighteenth-Century English (Cambridge, 2010), Areal Features of the Anglophone World (2012) and The Sound Structure of Modern Irish (2014).

    Contributors

    Raymond Hickey, Lyle Campbell, Balthasar Bickel, Victor A. Friedman, Brian D. Joseph, Juliette Blevins, Thomas Stolz, Nataliya Levkovych, Harry van der Hulst, Rob Goedemans, Keren Rice, Maria Koptjevskaja Tamm, Henrik Liljegren, Johan van der Auwera, Daniël Van Olmen, Bernd Kortmann, Verena Schröter, Alan Timberlake, Sven Grawunder, Geoffrey Haig, Bernd Heine, Anne-Maria Fehn, Gerrit Dimmendaal, Jeff Good, Tom Güldemann, Rajend Mesthrie, John Peterson, Umberto Ansaldo, Martine Robbeets, Gregory D. S. Anderson, Hilary Chappell, N. J. Enfield, James Kirby, Marc Brunelle, Louisa Miceli, Alan Dench, Malcolm Ross, Paul Geraghty, Anthony P. Grant, Marianne Mithun, Patience Epps, Lev Michael, Pieter Muysken, Joshua Birchall, Rik van Gijn, Olga Krasnouhova, Neele Müller

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