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The Cambridge Handbook of Evolutionary Ethics

The Cambridge Handbook of Evolutionary Ethics

CAD$33.95 (P)

Part of Cambridge Handbooks in Philosophy

Michael Ruse, Robert J. Richards, Hallvard Lillehammer, Jeffrey O'Connell, Trevor Pearce, Abraham H. Gibson, Naomi Beck, Richard Joyce, Justin Horn, Richard A. Richards, Robert J. Richards, Ben Fraser, Russ Shafer-Landau, William J. FitzPatrick, Justin Clarke-Doane, Uri D. Leibowitz, Neil Sinclair, Michael Vlerick, Frédéric Bouchard, Lynn Hankinson Nelson, Michael L. Peterson
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  • Date Published: August 2017
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107589605

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About the Authors
  • Evolutionary ethics - the application of evolutionary ideas to moral thinking and justification - began in the nineteenth century with the work of Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer, but was subsequently criticized as an example of the naturalistic fallacy. In recent decades, however, evolutionary ethics has found new support among both the Darwinian and the Spencerian traditions. This accessible volume looks at the history of thought about evolutionary ethics as well as current debates in the subject, examining first the claims of supporters and then the responses of their critics. Topics covered include social Darwinism, moral realism, and debunking arguments. Clearly written and structured, the book guides readers through the arguments on both sides, and emphasises the continuing relevance of evolutionary theory to our understanding of ethics today.

    • Presents a clear and accessible introduction to the complex issues surrounding the relevance of evolutionary thought to questions of ethics and morality
    • Explores the historical context of evolutionary ethics, from the work of Darwin and Spencer to the criticism of the philosopher G. E. Moore and later writers
    • Engages with both sides of the current debate, which has been revived in recent decades
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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2017
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107589605
    • length: 342 pages
    • dimensions: 246 x 173 x 19 mm
    • weight: 0.6kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Michael Ruse and Robert J. Richards
    Part I. Historical:
    1. Ethics, evolution and the a priori: Ross on Spencer and the French sociologists Hallvard Lillehammer
    2. Nietzsche's rejection of nineteenth-century evolutionary ethics Jeffrey O'Connell
    3. American pragmatism, evolution, and ethics Trevor Pearce
    4. The path to the present Abraham H. Gibson
    5. Social Darwinism and market morality: a modern-day view for evolutionary ethics Naomi Beck
    Part II. For Evolutionary Ethics:
    6. Darwinian evolutionary ethics Michael Ruse
    7. Human morality: from an empirical puzzle to a metaethical puzzle Richard Joyce
    8. Evolution and the epistemological challenge to moral realism Justin Horn
    9. Evolutionary naturalism and valuation Richard A. Richards
    10. Evolutionary ethics, a theory of moral realism Robert J. Richards
    11. Moral mismatch and abolition Ben Fraser
    Part III. Against Debunking Arguments:
    12. Moral realism and evolutionary debunking arguments Russ Shafer-Landau
    13. Why Darwinism does not debunk objective morality William J. FitzPatrick
    14. Debunking arguments: mathematics, logic, and modal security Justin Clarke-Doane
    15. Evolution and the missing link (in debunking arguments) Uri D. Leibowitz and Neil Sinclair
    16. Better than our nature? Evolution and moral realism, justification and progress Michael Vlerick
    Part IV. Elaborations:
    17. Darwinian ethics: biological individuality and moral relativism Frédéric Bouchard
    18. Evolutionary psychology, feminist critiques thereof, and the naturalistic fallacy Lynn Hankinson Nelson
    19. A theological evaluation of evolutionary ethics Michael L. Peterson.

  • Editors

    Michael Ruse, Florida State University
    Michael Ruse is Director of the Program in the History and Philosophy of Science at Florida State University. His publications include The Philosophy of Human Evolution (Cambridge, 2012), The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Darwin and Evolutionary Thought (Cambridge, 2013), and Science, Evolution, and Religion (2016).

    Robert J. Richards, University of Chicago
    Robert J. Richards is Morris Fishbein Distinguished Service Professor in the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Chicago. His publications include Darwin and the Emergence of Evolutionary Theories of Mind and Behavior (1987), Was Hitler a Darwinian? Disputed Questions in the History of Evolutionary Theory (2013), and Debating Darwin (2016).

    Contributors

    Michael Ruse, Robert J. Richards, Hallvard Lillehammer, Jeffrey O'Connell, Trevor Pearce, Abraham H. Gibson, Naomi Beck, Richard Joyce, Justin Horn, Richard A. Richards, Robert J. Richards, Ben Fraser, Russ Shafer-Landau, William J. FitzPatrick, Justin Clarke-Doane, Uri D. Leibowitz, Neil Sinclair, Michael Vlerick, Frédéric Bouchard, Lynn Hankinson Nelson, Michael L. Peterson

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