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Women, Work and Computing

Women, Work and Computing

CAD$40.95 (C)

  • Date Published: January 2001
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521777353

CAD$ 40.95 (C)
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About the Authors
  • It has been suggested that the ideal worker for occupational computing is now the hybrid--someone with excellent interpersonal as well as technical skills. It has also been suggested that women, because of their historical relationship with such skills, find themselves faced with a golden opportunity in computing. A further claim that computers can provide women with additional opportunities insofar as they provide changes in gender consciousness has also been mooted. Via the exploration and analysis of new qualitative evidence this book assesses the likelihood of these opportunities being realized.

    • Provision of primary qualitative evidence on gender/computing
    • Re-evaluation of existing gender/computing literature
    • Development of theoretical understanding of the women/computing relationship
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "...anyone concerned about how to make a company, course, or a department, contain the ingredients for equality will find some astute answers about what makes such a project so difficult, why inequality is so resilient to change, and why change is so central to the future of our local and global relationships." NWSA Journal

    "As only a few excellent case studies manage to do, this book stands out for its thoroughness and excellent integration of diverse arguments and research. Woodfield draws on an extensive body of theoretical and empirical work dispersed within different bodies of research on both sides of the Atlantic. Despite this varied material, Woodfield has succeeded in organizing it consistently so that it bears directly on her argument. This not only augments her findings but makes her book a valuable resource for researchers interested in women, work, and technology." Critical Sociology

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2001
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521777353
    • length: 222 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 153 x 17 mm
    • weight: 0.33kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Gender and the development of computer culture: the myth of the neutral computer
    2. Computers, communication and change: making way for the hybrids
    3. Softech: a 'twenty-first century organisation'
    4. Male and female pathways through the unit
    5. Hybrids and hierarchies
    6. Towards a framework for understanding the relationship between gender and skill in the unit
    7. The female future and new subjectivities
    8. Conclusion: is the future female?

  • Author

    Ruth Woodfield, University of Sussex
    Ruth Woodfield is Lecturer in Sociology at the School of Social Sciences, University of Sussex.

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