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John Locke and the Ethics of Belief
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Details

  • Page extent: 272 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.45 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 121
  • Dewey version: 20
  • LC Classification: B1298.R4 W65 1996
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Locke, John,--1632-1704.--Essay concerning human understanding
    • Locke, John,--1632-1704--Religion
    • Great Britain--Economic conditions
    • Labor productivity--Great Britain

Library of Congress Record

Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521559096 | ISBN-10: 052155909X)

Nicholas Wolterstorff discusses the ethics of belief which Locke developed in Book IV of his Essay Concerning Human Understanding, where Locke finally argued his overarching aim: how we ought to govern our belief, especially on matters of religion and morality. Wolterstorff shows that this concern was instigated by the collapse, in Locke's day, of a once-unified moral and religious tradition in Europe into warring factions. His was thus a culturally and socially engaged epistemology. This view of Locke invites a new interpretation of the origins of modern philosophy. He maintained that instead of following tradition we ought to let 'reason be our guide.' Accordingly, after discussing Hume's powerful attack on Locke's recommended practice, Wolterstorff argues for Locke's originality and emphasizes his contribution to the 'modernity' of post-sixteenth-century philosophy.

• Locke is interpreted, in his epistemology, as responding to the cultural crisis of his day (the fragmentation of tradition) • Focuses on Locke's account of how we ought to govern opinion • A new view of the origins of modern philosophy

Contents

Preface; 1. RATIONALITY IN EVERYDAY LIFE; 2. HUME'S ATTACK: WHY IMPLEMENTING LOCKE'S PRACTICE IS NOT ALWAYS DOING ONE'S BEST; 3. LOCKE'S ORIGINALITY; 4: LOCKE AND THE MAKING OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY; Index.

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