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Regression Analysis of Count Data
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  • 11 b/w illus. 37 tables
  • Page extent: 436 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.58 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 519.5/36
  • Dewey version: 21
  • LC Classification: QA278.2 .C36 1998
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Regression analysis
    • Econometrics
    • Sustainable development
    • Comparative economics--Congresses
    • Comparative government--Congresses

Library of Congress Record


 (ISBN-13: 9780521635677 | ISBN-10: 0521635675)

Students in both the natural and social sciences often seek regression models to explain the frequency of events, such as visits to a doctor, auto accidents or job hiring. This analysis provides a comprehensive account of models and methods to interpret such data. The authors have conducted research in the field for nearly fifteen years and in this work combine theory and practice to make sophisticated methods of analysis accessible to practitioners working with widely different types of data and software. The treatment will be useful to researchers in areas such as applied statistics, econometrics, operations research, actuarial studies, demography, biostatistics, quantitatively-oriented sociology and political science. The book may be used as a reference work on count models or by students seeking an authoritative overview. The analysis is complemented by template programs available on the Internet through the authors' homepages.

• Authors are the two leading researchers in the field • Count data is exploding area in econometrics and applied statistical areas in biology, demography, insurance, labor studies, sociology, and political science • Complemented by template programs on the internet through the authors' homepages


1. Introduction; 2. Model specification and estimation; 3. Basic count regression; 4. Generalized count regression; 5. Model evaluation and testing; 6. Empirical Illustrations; 7. Time series data; 8. Multivariate data; 9. Longitudinal data; 10. Measurement errors; 11. Non-random samples and simultaneity; 12. Flexible methods for counts; Notations and acronyms; Functions, Distributions and moments; Software; References.


'… a timely account of much of the relevant literature in this field.' Ivonia Rebelo, Economica

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