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The Slavic Languages
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Details

  • Page extent: 660 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 1.13 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 491.8
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: PG41 .S85 2006
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Slavic languages

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521223157 | ISBN-10: 0521223156)

The Slavic Languages

Cambridge University Press
9780521223157 - The Slavic Languages - by Roland Sussex and Paul Cubberley
Table of Contents


CONTENTS

   Preface   xvii
   Acknowledgments   xix
   Introduction   1
0.1Survey   1
0.2The Slavic languages in the world   1
0.3Languages, variants and nomenclature   2
0.3.1South Slavic   4
0.3.2East Slavic   5
0.3.3West Slavic   6
0.4Languages, polities and speakers   8
0.5Genetic classification and typology   9
0.6The linguistics of Slavic: empirical and theoretical characteristics   10
0.7Organization   13
0.7.1Transcription and transliteration   15
0.7.2Accent and stress   15
0.7.3Structure of the examples   17
0.7.4Abbreviations   17
0.8Outline   17
   Linguistic evolution, genetic affiliation and classification   19
1.1The Slavs: prehistory   19
1.2Slavic in Indo-European   21
1.2.1Slavic and Baltic   21
1.2.2Slavic and other Indo-European language families   24
1.3Proto-Slavic   25
1.3.1Phonology   26
1.3.2Morphology   40
1.3.3Syntax   41
1.4The sub-division of Slavic   42
1.5South Slavic   43
1.5.1Stage 1 features of South Slavic   43
1.5.2Stage 2 features of South Slavic   44
1.5.3Stage 3 features (individual South Slavic languages)   45
1.6East Slavic   46
1.6.1Stage 1 features of East Slavic   46
1.6.2Stage 2 features of East Slavic   48
1.6.3Stage 3 features (individual East Slavic languages)   50
1.7West Slavic   54
1.7.1Stage 1 features of West Slavic   54
1.7.2Stage 2 features of West Slavic   55
1.7.3Stage 3 features (individual West Slavic languages)   56
1.8Overview   58
   Socio-historical evolution   60
2.1The socio-historical context   60
2.1.1The external history of the Slavic languages   61
2.2South Slavic   62
2.2.1Old Church Slavonic and Church Slavonic   63
2.2.2Bulgarian   66
2.2.3Macedonian   69
2.2.4Serbo-Croatian, Serbian, Croatian and Bosnian   72
2.2.5Slovenian   76
2.3East Slavic   79
2.3.1Russian   81
2.3.2Ukrainian   84
2.3.3Belarusian (formerly Belorussian)   87
2.4West Slavic   89
2.4.1Polish   90
2.4.2Sorbian (Upper and Lower Sorbian)   93
2.4.3Kashubian and Slovincian   97
2.4.4Polabian   98
2.4.5Czech   98
2.4.6Slovak   101
2.5Overview   105
2.5.1Patterns of emergence of the standard languages   106
   Phonology   110
3.1Introduction   110
3.2Historical evolution and modern equivalences   110
3.2.1Development of the Proto-Slavic vowel system   111
3.2.2Development of the Proto-Slavic consonant system   137
3.2.3Development of Proto-Slavic sound combinations   149
3.2.4Development of the Proto-Slavic suprasegmental features   151
3.3Modern vowel systems   153
3.3.1Phonemes   153
3.3.2Phonetics   157
3.4Modern consonant systems   163
3.4.1Phonemes   163
3.4.2Phonetics   166
3.4.3Phonotactics and limitations on distribution   167
3.5Suprasegmentals   177
3.5.1Stress   178
3.5.2Quantity   186
3.5.3Tone   189
   Morphophonology   192
4.1Overview   192
4.2Vowel alternations   193
4.2.1Vowel ∼ zero alternations   194
4.2.2Vowel lengthening   197
4.2.3Vowel tone alternations   198
4.2.4Stress alternations   198
4.2.5Vowel quality alternations   199
4.2.6Czech přehláska (umlaut)   200
4.3Consonant alternations   201
4.3.1Palatalization   201
4.3.2Other simplex alternations   204
4.3.3Epenthetic /n/   205
4.3.4Voice alternations   205
4.3.5Consonant ∼ zero alternations   205
4.4Combined vowel and consonant alternations   206
4.4.1Liquids   206
4.4.2Approximants (j, v–w) and diphthongs   208
4.5Morphological typology of alternations   208
4.5.1Nouns: inflexion   208
4.5.2Nouns: word formation   211
4.5.3Adjectives: inflexion   212
4.5.4Adjectives: word formation   212
4.5.5Adverbs   212
4.5.6Verbs: inflexion   213
4.5.7Verbs: word formation   214
4.6Underlying forms and derivational rules   214
4.7Morphophonology and Slavic orthographies   215
   Morphology: inflexion   217
5.1Overview   217
5.2Morphological categories and structures   217
5.3Morphological word-classes   220
5.4Inflexional categories   222
5.4.1Number   222
5.4.2Case   226
5.4.3Definiteness and deixis   235
5.4.4Gender   235
5.4.5Person   241
5.4.6Tense   242
5.4.7Aspect   244
5.4.8Voice   245
5.4.9Mood   246
5.5Paradigms   248
5.5.1Nouns   248
5.5.2The adjective and determiner declension   262
5.5.31–2 Person pronouns and the reflexive pronoun   272
5.5.4Numerals   273
5.5.5Verbs   278
5.5.6Athematic and auxiliary verbs   308
   Syntactic categories and morphosyntax   309
6.1Syntactic units   309
6.1.1The syntactic word   309
6.1.2Syntactic word-classes   310
6.2Syntactic roles and relations   318
6.2.1Concord   319
6.2.2Agreement   325
6.2.3Government   330
6.2.4Case   333
6.3Aspect   342
   Sentence structure   347
7.1Sentence structure: overview   347
7.1.1Definiteness   357
7.1.2Questions   358
7.1.3Negation   360
7.1.4Imperatives   362
7.1.5Passives   368
7.1.6Conditionals   369
7.1.7Possession   370
7.2More complex constructions   371
7.2.1Coordinate constructions   371
7.2.2Subordinate constructions   374
7.3Specific construction types   389
7.3.1Pronouns and anaphora   389
7.3.2Reflexives   391
7.3.3Apersonal and impersonal constructions   393
7.3.4Indirection   398
7.3.5Participial constructions   400
7.3.6Gerundial constructions   401
7.3.7Ellipsis and deletion   402
7.4Word order   404
7.4.1Marking grammatical functions and relations   404
7.4.2Constituent structure   405
7.4.3Conventional word order   406
7.5Syntactic pragmatics: Functional Sentence Perspective   417
   Word formation   421
8.1Types of word formation   421
8.1.1Prefixation   425
8.1.2Suffixation   427
8.1.3Root combination   428
8.1.4Mixed types: prefixation + suffixation   429
8.1.5Morphophonological aspects of word formation   430
8.2Word formation and nouns   431
8.2.1Prefixation   431
8.2.2Suffixation   431
8.2.3Combination, coordination and subordination   439
8.2.4Prefixation + suffixation   440
8.2.5Nominalized adjectives   441
8.3Word formation and verbs   441
8.3.1Prefixation   444
8.3.2Suffixation   447
8.3.3Other issues   450
8.4Word formation and adjectives   451
8.4.1Prefixation   452
8.4.2Prefixation + suffixation   453
8.4.3Suffixation   453
8.4.4Gradation of adjectives   459
8.5Word formation and adverbs   462
8.5.1Gradation of adverbs   463
8.6Word formation and other parts of speech   465
8.6.1Numerals   465
8.6.2Pronouns, determiners and pro-adverbs   468
   Lexis   472
9.1Patterns of lexis   472
9.2Lexical composition and sources in the modern Slavic languages   473
9.2.1Indo-European and general Slavic   473
9.2.2The lexis of the individual Slavic languages   474
9.2.3Slavic and non-Slavic elements   475
9.2.4Slavization and vernacularization   476
9.3Coexistent lexical strata   477
9.3.1Russian: Church Slavonic and Russian   477
9.3.2B/C/S: Slavic and non-Slavic   478
9.3.3Bulgarian: Russian and Turkish   480
9.4Root implementation and exploitation   480
9.4.1Extending word formation   480
9.4.2Lexical specialization and verbs of motion   482
9.5Lexical innovation: indigenous lexical resources   483
9.5.1Semantic change   483
9.5.2Compounding   484
9.5.3Abbreviated words   484
9.6Lexical innovation: external influence   490
9.6.1Borrowing   490
9.6.2Calques   492
9.7Lexis after Communism   494
9.8Slavic on the Internet   497
   10 Dialects   499
10.1Overview   499
10.2Dialects of South Slavic   502
10.2.1Dialects of Slovenian   502
10.2.2Dialects of B/C/S   504
10.2.3Dialects of Macedonian   507
10.2.4Dialects of Bulgarian   510
10.3Dialects of East Slavic   513
10.3.1Dialects of Belarusian   514
10.3.2Dialects of Ukrainian   517
10.3.3Dialects of Russian   521
10.4Dialects of West Slavic   526
10.4.1Dialects of Sorbian   527
10.4.2Dialects of Polish   528
10.4.3Dialects of Czech   533
10.4.4Dialects of Slovak   535
10.5Dialects: summary   543
   11 Sociolinguistic issues   544
11.1The sociolinguistics of the Slavic languages   544
11.2Language definition and autonomy   544
11.2.1Status and criteria   544
11.2.2Standardization   547
11.2.3Purism and the culture of language   550
11.3Standard written and spoken variants   551
11.3.1Russian   552
11.3.2Czech   559
11.3.3Toward a more analytic Slavic?   562
11.4Sociolectal variation   563
11.4.1Address systems   565
11.4.2After Communism   571
11.5Bilingualism and diglossia   572
11.6The Slavic languages abroad   577
Appendix A: Abbreviations   586
A.1Language names   586
A.2Linguistic terms   587
Appendix B: Orthography and transliteration   590
B.1Diacritics and symbols   590
B.2Orthographical systems   592
Appendix C: Slavic linguistics: resources   600
C.1Overview   600
C.2Journals   600
C.3Conferences   601
C.4Monographs   601
C.5Electronic networks and resources   602
   Bibliography   603
   Index   621

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