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Language in the Brain

Details

  • 33 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 244 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.52 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 612.8/233
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: QP399 .S36 2010
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Neurolinguistics
    • Cognitive neuroscience

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521515498)

Language in the Brain
Cambridge University Press
9780521515498 - Language in the Brain - By Helmut Schnelle
Index

Subject index

Abstract system description 3

Acquisition of regularities of language and behaviour 53

Acts of recall and their brain organization 42

Advanced reason of science 38

Aesthetic vision

principles of 81

interpreting aesthetic forces 82

Affections, in infants’ developments 101

Archetypes

fundamental types for nouns 155

in folk-psychology 27

people, animals, and things 151, 152

symbols 154

Argument structure 128

Artistic interpretation of pieces of art or aesthetic p hoto 80, 81

As-if emotionality 106

Attention organization 72

Attention organized in the prefrontal cortex 88

Attention system 88

Attention to each other 169

Attractor complex 207

fixed point attractors

Automatic organization of grammar 52

Automatic processing 164

Autonomic nervous system 19, 93, 98

the wisdom of the body and the self 90

Background 184

Background emotions

types of 92, 105, 106

in creative thought 84

Background knowledge applied in rehearsal processes 78

Background supported grouping of structures 78

Binding

and fixed attractor activity 207

and synchronizing of activity 103

competence 200

in a cognit complex 15, 41

in Fuster’s model criterion 59

of cortical cluster activity 44

neurocognitive operation 126

Binding processes generating understanding by interactive integration 63

Biological dynamism and mental drive 41

Body emotions and the role of body contacts 101

Body internal signals generate “internal objects” 103

Body of a person and self experience 39

Body wisdom 169

Brain architecture and brain components

functions of mind and behaviour 18–21, 19

brain components

cooperate in different brain regions 10

as pieces of knowledge 12

organizing types of concrete linguistic semantics 89

Brain development and the genetic plan 194

principles of brain maturation 55

Brain processes identifying spatial or temporal gestalt 65

Bridging

brain architecture and structure of categories 114

mind brain gaps 41

linguistic structure observations and neurocognitive networks 114

Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas 16, 47


Categorical integration 72 (S. 3.4.5)

Cellular system connectionism 8

See Connectionism

Checking procedures 126

Chunking and episodic buffer 78

Classifications and combinations in formal linguistics 33

Cognition

functions and body state feeling 19

new understanding of cognition 5

Cognitive networks, situation conditioned 50

Cognits 12, 15

and language competence knowledge 120

as pieces of knowledge 45

background cognits 50

generating activity binding 15

in neurocognitive networks 195

LF-Cognits 47

M-cognits representing concrete meanings 48

memory and mental cognits 50

Collateral information processing 205, 208

Columnar modules or neural clusters 15

Combinatoriality

formation rule systems 124

multiple grammatical sources and organizations 124, 125

Competence of adult speakers 136

Computational cognition and neurocognition, a basic difference 49

Conceptualization and categorization of language form 18

Concrete meaning 47

Concrete semantic and pragmatic feeling of the self 91

Concrete semantics and brain components for its organization 89

Configurations and gestalt based on vision and haptic gesture 65

Connectionism

problem of structure analysis in parallel processing 66

critique of standard computational form 191–192

problems with single units’ connectionism 190

the arguments fixed on simple connectionism do not generalize 67, 70

Conscious mental images 3

Consciousness and intentionality 171

Constituent structure grammar in formal representations 196–198

Construals 143

Construction rule systems 33

for generating formal linguistic structures

Cooperating brain components 72

Cooperation of different brain regions 10

Correlation of intentional action and neural causality 49

Creative acts

archetypes 162

in human vision and thinking and constitution of self and social 79

creative thought in science 83–84

supported by background knowledge 84

Creativity 168 (Brain development)

developing language stages in the brain 24

developing language use frameworks 26

of brain architecture 19

of brain architecture by fine-tuning 23

of functions after birth 22–23

and their stages in infants 100

Discipline triangle 18

functional disciplines 5

Dynamism biological, and mental drive 41

Each-other archetypes 175

Each-other relations 169, 173

positive each other acts and attitudes 173

Efficiency and flexibility

in proto grammar 139

of language usage 133, 137–139

Emotions

across languages and cultures 9

and feelings 99, 166

as-if emotionality 106

mild emotions 105

explosive emotions 105

strong emotions 91

prosody and background emotions 106

types of background emotions 105, 106

Evolution of brain architecture 22–23

Evolutionary language development based on early human rituals 62

Experience of life and self 211

Eye movement organization based on brain components 72 (S. 3.4.5)


Feeling 19

Feeling of self-presence 19, 41

Feeling and semantics 20

Fine-tuning 23, 101

in language development 25–26, 27

in nature and nurture 24

of developing competences 23

of internal cluster structure 12

Flexibility of language use 141

See also Efficiency

Formal mental entities 4

Formally structured language 4

Formation rules their translations into active neurocognitive models 203

Frameworks for fluent uttering of language 141

Free word order in communication dynamic discourse 187

Frege’s logical syntax proposal 128–130 (S.5.6)

Functional disciplines of cognition 5, 33

Functional linguistics 5

Functional neural networks as pieces of knowledge 12

Functional neurobiology 5

Functional phenomenology 5

Functionality details of the discipline triangle 18

Functions

functions of brain components and brain activity 16, 82

instantiated by many brain areas 17

Gap between formal linguistics and neuronal descriptions 181

Gestalt psychology 17

theory and functional brain analysis 6, 17, 39

Global workspace model of interactions of brain components 127

Grammar

and logic 132

as meaningful 133

formally represented 118

generative grammar 116

grammatical sub-categories 118

integrated in communicative life 133–134

integrated in semantics and pragmatics 134, 144

interpreted in a framework of visual situation 144

neurocognitively presented in the brain 119

categories and structure terms 117

grammatical groupings and sound patterns 65

Graphic representations and their role in grammar and science 118

Grounding in sentence organization 52

Grouping sounds

supported by babbling 77

support for structural hierarchy (e.g., rhythm) 77

Growth of synapses 82

Hermeneutics 165

Heterarchical connections integrating cognitive networks 57

Hierarchy of neural sub-divisions 41

distributed converging and diverging modules 206

functional levels 42

of meanings 47

of perception–action cycles and of language form 45

Higher order meaning relations in acts of intelligence and creativity 55

Homeostasis and viscera 90, 93

Hypercolumns 199

Images memorized and organized in recall 18

Imaginative thought 88

symbol guided 16

requires selectivity acts in pre-frontal cortex 88

Inductive and deductive logic 56

Inference 52

Inference connections 52

Inference structures 52

Information flow in sensory hierarchy 43

Innate predispositions 24

expressed in hierarchy cycles 45

neural networks developmental fine-tuning 101

Integrated elementary cognits in complex understanding units 15

Integrated feature complexes 77

See also Saccadic eye movements

Integrating elementary cognits into complex understanding units 15


Integration 19, 164

of biological organization 19, 21

of cognitive networks and heterarchical connections 57

of efficient expression forms and meanings 136

in text understanding process 76

brain model 167

Integrative identification in saccadic eye movements 69

Intelligence, advanced 106

Intentionality 157 (S. 7.2), 168

action and neural causality 49

we-intentionality 171

Interaction of brain processes emotion and feeling prefrontal selectivity 103, 104

Interdependency of language, knowledge and feeling 93

Interdependent systems of functions of mind and behaviour 18–21

Interdisciplinary problem

translating grammar structure into neurocognitive dynamic 199

inter-translations of perspectives 182, 191

the linguists problems 196

Interdisciplinary studies and their difficulties 32

Inter-neurons 200

Intentional satisfaction 168

Intuitive knowledge of rule applications 3

Knowing that and knowing how 49–50

Language

acquisition of regularities during the first decade 53

as a social institution 6

during first decade of life 53

empirical studies of developmental stages 100

evolution and development 116

form organization 58

pre-language acquisition in infants 100

Language evolution

based on primitive vocal and gestural communication 62

based on ritual context 62

Language readiness based on brain architecture functions 61

Lesion differences in LF-cognits and M-cognits 48

Levels of integration in the brain 166

Lichtheim model 28

Limitations

of understanding the brain’s systems 136

of the neurocognitive sciences 58

Linguistic form-meaning binding 72

Linguistic reason analyzed by symbolic rule systems 39

Linguistic tradition 115, 117

Linguistics with formalist techniques 132

usage-based 133

Logical structure analysis 156 (S. 7.2)

Logical syntax 122

Maturation of pre-frontal cortex 57

Meaning

and communicative social interaction 134

background 113

concrete 113

concentration on personal or individual core-self 166

depending on context, background and discourse 155

in terms of argument structure 161

relations 48

theory of 129 (S. 5.6)

Meaningful

the notion of events 166

context data organization 208

Meditation acts involving the autonomic nervous system 185

Memory

active for the short term 202

and mental cognits 50

dynamic brain memory 49

neurocognitively organized 87

versus static store memory 49

Mental aspect differences 87

Mental understanding of meaning 3

Mentalize and empathize 169

Mind

the notion of f-mind 123

mentalize and empathize 127

the world in the mind 125

intersubjective mindscape 183

Mind/brain/body

as an acting unit 158 (S. 7.2)

See also World understanding

their plurality in the world 169, 173

Mirror neuron systems 56, 59–61


Model constructions that are empirically supported 58

Morpho-syntax 186

Myelination 24

Nervous system components 41

Neural clusters

See Columnar modules

Neural cluster connectionism 10

See Connectionism

Neural computational power 201

Neural dynamic power organization 13

See Static linguistic

Neural micro-and macro level 200

Neural module processing contradicts simple units’ connectionism 201

Neural networks and rule systems of grammars 18

Neurocognitive model

for syntactic processing 206–207

frameworks derived from symbolic frameworks 200

processing power for efficient language 210

working models 200

Neuronal circuits 114

Neuronal cluster modules

complex functions 204

for token organization 204

Object - Frege’s notion 130 (S. 5.6)

Objective events 78, 154

Objective social reality 171

Objectivity and subjectivity 145

depending on onstage analysis 153

See also Objective events

Ontogenetic development of the perception–action system 86

Optical illusions 71

Organic and mental stage levels 40

Organized brain interaction 39

Other mind knowledge 6

Pan-organic system analysis 33–36

Perception and action images memorized 18

Perception checking procedures 126

Perception–action processes versus body-based self experience 141

Personal pronoun meanings

expressing primarily feeling or deixis? 174

personal experience or deictic role 95

the infant’s learning 97

Phenomenological psychology and language analysis 6

Phenomenological reflection and gestalt theory 17–18

Phonological feature groups 201

Play and games and their developmental roles 101

Pre-frontal cortex

areas and their central roles 27

organization of correlation functions 91

organization of selectivity 72 (S. 3.4.5)

organized integration 19, 21

relevance for integrative reasoning and planning 85–86

relevance for language use organization 87

Principle

Baars’ principle 6, 8

Fuster’s principle 51

Jakobson–Teuber principle 15, 41, 87

problems for its general application 204

of developmental stages 55

Prototypes of efficiency 139, 151, 185

Psychologizing language and the world 125

Psychology and neuro-psychology, challenge of their relation 154

Pyramidal neurons 200

Ranking of nouns in basic sentences 155, 158 (S. 7.2)

Reason, practical 150

Reasoning persons as organized selves 17, 39

Reciprocal verbs 175

Rhyme, its potential neurocognitive organization 209

Rules for combinatorial construction 33

Saccadic eye movements 66, 68

in text reading 75

saccadic integration 69

Salience in the flow of discourse 189

Selection

of an expression 143

organized among knowledge alternatives 164

Selective action, pre-frontal cortex organized 52

Self 127

concentration in conscious operation 92

self feelings in the infant 98

self feelings are also perceptions 107

self with the other 178

Semantic levels of descriptive forms 159

Semantic relation of sound and vision 43

Semantic structures, more extended frameworks needed 179

Semantics of feeling 20

Semantics without logical notions for formal category systems 125

See Concrete semantics

Short-term memory 44

Skeletal expressions 141, 153

versus detailed construals 142

Skeletal word collections as bases of grammatical acts 52

Skin signals and feeling environment 108

Social world

based on self and other selves’ experiences and attitudes 56

Socially shared rules 172

Solipsism methodologcae 127, 172

Spatial and temporal gestalt based on vision and gestural feeling 65

Spatial gestalt 74 (S.3.5.4)

its visual brain computing 74

saccadic eye movement procedure against geometry 160

Spatial structure description 159

Static linguistic term interpretation 12

See Neural dynamic

Sub-cortical and midbrain formations contribute to drive, motivation and attention 86

Subjective and objective domains of internal experiences 89, 105

Subjective and objective time 148

time and aspect 150

Superior colliculi visual map organization 72 (S.3.4.5)

Symbolic expressions 56

Synchronized interactive modules 201

Syntacto-centricity of linguistic studies 122

Temporal integration

of ordered complexes 209

organized by recurrent cluster activation 209

The role of the space 72 (S.3.4.5)

See Superior colliculi

Theory of mind 127

Theory of other mind 169

Three perspectives of analysis 4

Tokens

how they are organized in neurocognitive networks 203, 204

neurocognitive organisation problem solved 207

Topic-focus structure of sentences in discourse 187

Typed variable 203

Typology of languages 189

Variable 129 (S. 5.6)

Variable and its potential neural organization 209

Verbal rehearsal 76

Visual attention focus 68

Wernicke’s areas 47

Working memory 49, 50, 193

Working memory and misleading conceptualizations 201

Working storage 76

World understanding

depending on our intelligent mind/brain/body’s organization 154




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