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The Cambridge Companion to Malcolm X

Details

  • Page extent: 210 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.48 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: n/a
  • Dewey version: n/a
  • LC Classification: BP223.Z8 L57 2010
  • LC Subject headings:
    • X, Malcolm,--1925-1965
    • African American Muslims--Biography

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521515900)

Malcolm X is one of the most important figures in the twentieth-century struggle for equality in America. With the passing of time, and changing attitudes to race and religion in American society, the significance of a public figure like Malcolm X continues to evolve and to challenge. This Companion presents new perspectives on Malcolm X's life and legacy in a series of specially commissioned essays by prominent scholars from a range of disciplines. As a result, this is an unusually rich analysis of this important African American leader, orator, and cultural icon. Intended as a source of information on his life, career and influence and as an innovative substantive scholarly contribution in its own right, the book also includes an introduction, a chronology of the life of Malcolm X, and a select bibliography.

• Aimed at undergraduate and graduate students of American history or American studies • Provides an up-to-date overview of scholarship on Malcolm X and detailed analysis of his life and work • Includes a chronology and guide to further reading

Contents

Chronology; Introduction Robert E. Terrill; 1. Malcolm X and Elijah Muhammad Claude Clegg; 2. Autobiography and identity: Malcolm X as author and hero Alex Gillespie; 3. Bringing Malcolm X to Hollywood Brian Norman; 4. Malcolm X and black masculinity in process Jeffrey B. Leak; 5. Womanizing Malcolm X Sheila Radford-Hill; 6. Malcolm X and the black arts movement James Smethurst; 7. Malcolm X and African American conservatism Angela D. Dillard; 8. Malcolm X and youth culture Richard Brent Turner; 9. Homo Rhetoricus AfroAmericanus: Malcolm X and the rhetorical ideal of life Mark Lawrence McPhail; 10. Judgment and critique in the rhetoric of Malcolm X Robert E. Terrill; 11. Nightmarish landscapes: geography and the dystopian writings of Malcolm X James Tyner; 12. Afrocentricity and Malcolm X Molefi Kete Asante; 13. Malcolm X in global perspective Kevin Gaines; 14. The legacy of Malcolm X William W. Sales, Jr; Guide to further reading; Index.

Prize Winner

A Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2011 - Winner

Contributors

Robert E. Terrill, Claude Clegg, Alex Gillespie, Brian Norman, Jeffrey B. Leak, Sheila Radford-Hill, James Smethurst, Angela D. Dillard, Richard Brent Turner, Mark Lawrence McPhail, James Tyner, Molefi Kete Asante, Kevin Gaines, William W. Sales, Jr

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