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Incivility

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  • 16 b/w illus. 38 tables
  • Page extent: 230 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.38 kg

Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521719803)

Incivility
Cambridge University Press
9780521895514 - Incivility - The Rude Stranger in Everyday Life - By Philip Smith, Timothy L. Phillips and Ryan D. King
Frontmatter/Prelims

Incivility

Has anyone ever pushed in front of you in a queue? Stolen your parking space? Talked on their mobile phone during a film at the cinema? In our everyday lives we all encounter rude and inconsiderate people. This unique book provides the first ever systematic investigation of typical encounters with rudeness. Through a meticulous analysis of over 500 events, it maps out what people experience as rude, where and when this happens and what takes place in the exchange between the participants. The inquiry further charts the emotional and social consequences of rudeness and victimization, with the results challenging the widespread assumption that bad behaviour is toxic to community life. In conclusion the study draws upon its findings and surveys a range of strategies for reducing the level of incivility in everyday life, identifying some simple and innovative solutions. Incivility will appeal to criminologists, sociologists and scholars of urban studies.

Philip Smith is Professor in the Department of Sociology, and Co-Director of the Yale Center for Cultural Sociology at Yale University.

Timothy L. Phillips is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of Tasmania.

Ryan D. King is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University at Albany, SUNY.


Incivility

The Rude Stranger in Everyday Life

Philip Smith, Timothy L. Phillips and Ryan D. King


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
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Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521719803
© Philip Smith, Timothy L. Phillips and Ryan D. King 2010

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2010
Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication data

Smith, Philip (Philip Daniel), 1964–
Incivility : the rude stranger in everyday life / Philip Smith, Timothy L. Phillips, Ryan D. King.
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-521-89551-4 – ISBN 978-0-521-71980-3 (pbk.) 1. Courtesy. I. Phillips, Timothy L. II. King, Ryan D. III. Title.
HF5389.3.U6S65 2010
177′.1–dc22
2010011225

ISBN 978-0-521-89551-4 Hardback
ISBN 978-0-521-71980-3 Paperback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


This book is dedicated to the memory of Raymond Smith and Donald Phillips. Always happy to talk to strangers, both were believers in the virtue of civility.


Contents

List of Figures and Tables
viii
Preface and acknowledgements
xi
1     Redirecting incivility research
1
2     The fundamentals of the incivil encounter
23
3     Everyday incivility and the everyday round
41
4     Emotions and sequences
66
5     Gender, age and class: divergent experiences?
83
6     After the event: coping, avoiding and changing
105
7     General attitudes towards the stranger: exploring fear and trust
129
8     How to confront incivility
160
9     Twenty questions and answers
193
References
202
Index
214

Figures and tables

Figures

3.1         Time of day event occurred
43
3.2         Setting of rude event
44
3.3         Regularity with which the respondent goes to the place where the event happened
48
3.4         Perception of the place where the event happened
49
3.5         Level of surprise at the rude stranger’s behaviour
50
3.6         Mobility status of victim and rude stranger
63
4.1         Type of response to rude stranger’s conduct
71
5.1         Histogram of time spent in landscapes of mass culture
91
5.2         Probability of encountering a rude stranger by time spent in landscapes of mass culture
93
6.1         Number of coping behaviours reported by respondents
110
6.2         Effects of emotions on types of coping
117
6.3         Behavioural and emotional changes following rude stranger encounter
120
6.4         Effects of emotions on behavioural and attitudinal changes
126
7.1         Fear of crime in public places during day and night
134
7.2         Trust in people in general
137
7.3         Expected probability of high distrust by type of media consumption
158

Tables

1.1         Criminological and interactionist approaches to incivility
15
2.1(a)      What the stranger did to the respondent to qualify as ‘rude’: rank order
25
2.1(b)      What the stranger did to the respondent to qualify as ‘rude’: aggregated categories
26
2.2(a)      Locale where the encounter occurred: rank order
27
2.2(b)      Locale where the encounter occurred: aggregated categories
28
2.3         Type of everyday incivility by locale where the encounter occurred
30
2.4         Visible social attributes assigned to the rude stranger
31
2.5         Whether the event was accidental or deliberate by visible social attributes of the rude stranger
33
2.6(a)      Victims and non-victims of everyday incivility: a comparison of social attributes
35
2.6(b)      Victims and non-victims of everyday incivility: a comparison of social attributes
36
2.7         Risk factors for experiencing everyday incivility: rank order
38
3.1         Event setting by time of day
46
3.2         Regularity of presence at place of event by event characteristics
51
3.3         Victim and rude stranger similarities: age and gender
53
3.4         Victim’s gender by offender’s gender and type of setting
54
3.5         Crowding and mass movement
57
3.6         Movement-related qualities of victims and rude strangers
59
3.7         Payload-related qualities: victim and rude stranger
62
4.1         Emotions at three time-points
69
4.2         Types of direct responses to rude stranger and reported motivation
72
4.3         Types of indirect responses to rude stranger
74
4.4         Initial behavioural response by three types of initial emotional reactions
76
4.5         Perception of rude stranger and place of incident by level of surprise
78
4.6         Frequency of sustained encounters
79
4.7         Drivers of incident duration
81
5.1         Rude stranger encounters and criminal victimization by respondent background characteristics
87
5.2         Time spent in landscapes of mass culture by respondent background characteristics
92
5.3         Logistic regression coefficients: rude stranger encounter on background variables with and without controlling for time spent in landscapes of mass culture
94
5.4         Emotional reactions to incivility by demographic and incident characteristics
100
6.1         Coping behaviours
111
6.2         OLS regression coefficients: coping on predictor variables
113
6.3         Changes in emotions and behaviours since the event
119
6.4         Logistic regression coefficients: behavioural changes on predictor variables
123
7.1         Perceptions of danger at night by respondent characteristics
140
7.2         Bivariate correlations for social distrust and predictor variables
142
7.3         Regression coefficients: predictors of fear of crime and distrust in others
144
7.4         Logistic regression coefficients: fear of crime at night on media consumption
154
7.5         Ordered logit coefficients: distrust on media consumption
156




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