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The Cambridge Companion to Classical Islamic Theology


  • Page extent: 347 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.56 kg


 (ISBN-13: 9780521785495)

This series of critical reflections on the evolution and major themes of pre-modern Muslim theology begins with the revelation of the Koran, and extends to the beginnings of modernity in the eighteenth century. The significance of Islamic theology reflects the immense importance of Islam in the history of monotheism, to which it has brought a unique approach and style, and a range of solutions which are of abiding interest. Devoting especial attention to questions of rationality, scriptural fidelity, and the construction of 'orthodoxy', this volume introduces key Muslim theories of revelation, creation, ethics, scriptural interpretation, law, mysticism, and eschatology. Throughout the treatment is firmly set in the historical, social and political context in which Islam's distinctive understanding of God evolved. Despite its importance, Islamic theology has been neglected in recent scholarship, and this book provides a unique, scholarly but accessible introduction.

• Provides a thorough introduction to Muslim theology • Assumes no specialist knowledge of the subject • Covers key aspects of doctrine, scriptural interpretation, law and ethics, and mysticism


Introduction Tim Winter; Part I. Historical Perspectives: 1. The Koran and Hadith M. Abdel Haleem; 2. Early kalām Khalid Blankinship; 3. Falsafa Hossein Ziai; 4. The developed kalām tradition Oliver Leaman and Sajjad Rizvi; 5. The social construction of orthodoxy Ahmed El Shamsy; Part II. Themes: 6. God: essence and attributes Nader El-Bizri; 7. Creation David Burrell; 8. Ethics Stefan Stelzer; 9. Revelation Yahya Michot; 10. Cosmology and the existence of God Ayman Shihadeh; 11. Worship William C. Chittick; 12. Theology and jurisprudence Umar F. Abd Allah; 13. Theology and mysticism Toby Mayer; 14. Epistemology and divine discourse Paul Hardy; 15. Eschatology Marcia Hermansen.


'… a reader-friendly volume faithful to the Cambridge series' promise to 'provide an accessible and stimulating introduction to the subject for new readers and non-specialists'.' The Muslim World Book Review

'Tim Winter (University of Cambridge) has brought together fifteen essays on classical Islamic theology at an opportune time, given sentiment today, alerting us to developments in critical understanding of the early period of Islam (in this book, between the seventh century and the sixteenth), and showing us how key theological issues were teased out by various scholars and schools. In doing this, the companion succeeds in mediating what is often a marginalized area of Islamic studies for the ordinary reader …' Reference Reviews


Tim Winter, M. Abdel Haleem, Khalid Blankinship, Hossein Ziai, Oliver Leaman, Sajjad Rizvi, Ahmed El Shamsy, Nader El-Bizri, David Burrell, Stefan Stelzer, Yahya Michot, Ayman Shihadeh, William C. Chittick, Umar F. Abd Allah, Toby Mayer, Paul Hardy, Marcia Hermansen

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