Cambridge Catalogue  
  • Help
Home > Catalogue > Landscape and Gender in Italian Opera
Landscape and Gender in Italian Opera
Google Book Search

Search this book

Details

  • 15 b/w illus. 26 music examples
  • Page extent: 368 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.71 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 782.1/0945/09034
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: ML1733.4 .S46 2005
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Opera--Italy--19th century
    • Opera--Italy--20th century
    • Heroines in opera
    • Virginity in opera
    • Mountains in opera

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521834377 | ISBN-10: 0521834376)




LANDSCAPE AND GENDER IN ITALIAN OPERA





In this unusual study, Emanuele Senici explores the connection between landscape and gender in Italian opera through the emblematic figure of the Alpine virgin. In the nineteenth century, operas portraying an emphatically virginal heroine, a woman defined by her virginity, were often set in the mountains, most frequently the Alps. The clarity of the sky, the whiteness of the snow and the purity of the air were associated with the ‘innocence’ of the female protagonist. Senici discusses a number of works particularly relevant to the origins, transformations and meanings of this conventional association including Bellini's La sonnambula (1831), Donizetti's Linda di Chamounix (1842), Verdi's Luisa Miller (1849), and Puccini's La fanciulla del West (1910). This convention presents an unusual point of view – a theme rather than a composer, a librettist, a singer or a genre – from which to observe Italian opera ‘at work’ over a century.

Emanuele Senici is University Lecturer in Music at the University of Oxford, where he is a Fellow of St Hugh's College. In 2002 he was awarded the Jerome Roche Prize of the Royal Musical Association. He is author of ‘La clemenza di Tito’ di Mozart: i primi trent’anni (1791–1821) (1997), editor of The Cambridge Companion to Rossini (2004) and co-editor of the Cambridge Opera Journal.





CAMBRIDGE STUDIES IN OPERA
Series editor Arthur Groos Cornell University

Volumes for Cambridge Studies in Opera explore the cultural, political and social influences of the genre. As a cultural art form, opera is not produced in a vacuum. Rather, it is influenced, whether directly or in more subtle ways, by its social and political environment. In turn, opera leaves its mark on society and contributes to shaping the cultural climate. Studies to be included in the series will look at these various relationships including the politics and economics of opera, the operatic representation of women or the singers who portrayed them, the history of opera as theatre, and the evolution of the opera house.

Published titles


Opera Buffa in Mozart's Vienna

Edited by Mary Hunter and James Webster

Johann Strauss and Vienna: Operetta and the Politics of Popular Culture

Camille Crittenden

German Opera: From the Beginnings to Wagner

John Warrack

Opera and Drama in Eighteenth-Century London: The King's Theatre, Garrick and the Business of Performance

Ian Woodfield

Opera, Liberalism, and Antisemitism in Nineteenth-Century France: The Politics of Halévy's La Juive

Diana R. Hallman

Aesthetics of Opera in the Ancien Régime, 1647–1785

Downing A. Thomas

Three Modes of Perception in Mozart: The Philosophical, Pastoral, and Comic in Così fan tutte

Edmund J. Goehring





Landscape and Gender in Italian Opera

The Alpine Virgin from Bellini to Puccini


Emanuele Senici








CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore,
São Paulo

Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge, CB2 2RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press,
New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521834377

© Emanuele Senici 2005

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and
to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements,
no reproduction of any part may take place without
the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2005

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

ISBN-13 978-0-521-83437-7 hardback
ISBN-10 0-521-83437 -6 hardback
ISBN-13 978-0-521 - paperback
ISBN-10 0-521 - paperback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or
accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to
in this book, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is,
or will remain, accurate or appropriate.





Contents




List of illustrations vii
Acknowledgements ix

1 Virgins, mountains, opera 1
2 ‘At the foot of the Alps’: the landscape of La sonnambula 21
3 Linda di Chamounix and the ideology of chastity 93
4 The politics of genre in Luisa Miller 143
5 Deflowering the Alps: from I promessi sposi to La Wally and Fedora 181
6 La fanciulla del West: a new landscape for a new virgin 228

Notes 263
Bibliography 327
Index 349





Illustrations




Fig. 2.1 Alessandro Sanquirico, stage design for Act 1, scene 1 of Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro Carcano, 1831) 45

Fig. 2.2 Alessandro Sanquirico, stage design for Act 2, scene 1 of Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro Carcano, 1831) 46

Fig. 2.3 Alessandro Sanquirico, stage design for Act 2, scene 2 of Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro Carcano, 1831) 47

Fig. 2.4 Alessandro Sanquirico, stage design for Act 1, scene 2 of Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro Carcano, 1831) 48

Fig. 2.5 Costume for Teresa in Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro Carcano, 1831). (Milan: Ricordi, 1831) 49

Fig. 2.6 Costume for Elvino in Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro Carcano, 1831). (Milan: Ricordi, 1831) 50

Fig. 2.7 Filippo Peroni, costume for Rodolfo in Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 1855). (Museo Teatrale alla Scala, Milan) 75

Fig. 2.8 Filippo Peroni, costume for Elvino in Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 1855). (Museo Teatrale alla Scala, Milan) 76

Fig. 2.9 Filippo Peroni, costume for Lisa in Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 1855). (Museo Teatrale alla Scala, Milan) 77

Fig. 2.10 Filippo Peroni, costume for Amina in Act 1 of Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 1855). (Museo Teatrale alla Scala, Milan) 78

Fig. 2.11 Filippo Peroni, costume for Amina in Act 2 of Bellini's La sonnambula (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 1855). (Museo Teatrale alla Scala, Milan) 79

Fig. 5.1 Adolf Hohenstein, stage design for Act 1 of Catalani's La Wally (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 1892). (Archivio Storico Ricordi, Milan) 223

Fig. 5.2 Adolf Hohenstein, stage design for Act 2 of Catalani's La Wally (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 1892). (Archivio Storico Ricordi, Milan) 224

Fig. 5.3 Adolf Hohenstein, stage design for Act 3 of Catalani's La Wally (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 1892). (Archivio Storico Ricordi, Milan) 225

Fig. 5.4 Adolf Hohenstein, stage design for Act 4 of Catalani's La Wally (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 1892). (Archivio Storico Ricordi, Milan) 226






Acknowledgments



I would like to acknowledge the Faculty of Music, Christ Church and St Hugh's College, Oxford, and the Arts and Humanities Research Board of England for institutional and financial support during the writing of this book. I am thankful to the staff at the Music Faculty Library (especially John Wagstaff), the Bodleian Library and the Taylorian Library of the University of Oxford, and the Biblioteca del Conservatorio ‘Giuseppe Verdi’, the Museo Teatrale alla Scala and the Archivio Storico Ricordi (especially Maria Pia Ferraris), Milan, for their gracious help. I am also grateful to David Bretherton for setting the music examples, Enrique Sacau‐Ferreira for compiling the index, and Lucy Carolan for copy‐editing the text, all expertly and expeditiously, and especially to Victoria Cooper of Cambridge University Press for shepherding the book from proposal to production and offering friendly support and skilful editorship all along. An earlier version of chapter 4 was published in 19th‐Century Music 22 (1998–9) : I acknowledge the University of California Press for granting authorisation to reproduce that material here, and James Hepokoski, co‐editor of the journal, for greatly improving the article. In 1997 a much earlier version of parts of chapter 3 was submitted for publication in the proceedings of the conference Donizetti e il teatro musicale europeo (Venice, Teatro La Fenice, May 1997), forthcoming from the Fondazione Donizetti, Bergamo.

David Rosen, my adviser at Cornell, who supervised the dissertation from which this book originated with an unparalleled combination of challenging engagement and contagious enthusiasm, continued to dispense precious advice and invaluable encouragement, as did Arthur Groos, who smoothly metamorphed from dissertation reader into series editor ; I am very grateful to them both, per tutto. My warmest thanks to all those who commented on early drafts, answered queries, provided unpublished or otherwise unavailable materials, and offered suggestions and encouragement : Suzanne Aspden, Davide Daolmi, Gabriele Dotto, Michelle Duncan, Linda Fairtile, Peter Franklin, Andy Fry, Maria Fusaro, Michele Girardi, Karen Henson, Gundula Kreuzer, François Lévy, Anna Linton, Sarah McKibben, Roger Moseley, Cormac Newark, Pierluigi Petrobelli, Pierpaolo Polzonetti, Alessandro Roccatagliati, Emilio Sala, Laura Tunbridge, Benjamin Walton. Alessandra Campana, Suzie Clark, Mary Ann Smart and Anya Suschitzky have been especially close to this book, and to me, and are especially deserving of my profound and affectionate gratitude. The most deeply heartfelt thankyou is for Roger Parker, who has done more than anybody else, with infinite patience and endless good humour. Finally, a very special grazie to Vincenzo Borghetti who, among many other things, keeps reminding me of the importance of the Apennines in the cultural geography of Italy.

This book is dedicated to my godchildren Giulia Gitti, Elizabeth Yearsley, Florian Solinas Newark and Giovanni de Jaegher, with love.

Oxford, July 2004.

<
printer iconPrinter friendly version AddThis