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Technological Medicine

Details

  • 24 b/w illus. 2 tables
  • Page extent: 246 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.48 kg

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521835695)

TECHNOLOGICAL MEDICINE
Cambridge University Press
9780521835695 - TECHNOLOGICAL MEDICINE - The Changing World of Doctors and Patients - By Stanley Joel Reiser
Frontmatter/Prelims

TECHNOLOGICAL MEDICINE: The Changing World of Doctors and Patients

Advances in medicine have brought us the stethoscope, artificial kidneys, and computerized health records. They have also changed the doctor-patient relationship.

This book explores how the technologies of medicine are created and how we respond to the problems and successes of their use. Stanley Joel Reiser, MD, walks us through the ways medical innovations exert their influence by discussing a number of selected technologies including the X-ray, ultrasound, and respirator. Reiser creates a new understanding of thinking about how health care is practiced in the United States and thereby suggests new approaches to effectively meet the challenges of living with technological medicine.

As health care reform continues to be an intensely debated topic in America, Technological Medicine shows us the pros and cons of applying technological solutions to health and illness.

Stanley Joel Reiser, Clinical Professor of Health Care Sciences and of Health Policy at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, is known nationally and internationally for his scholarship and teaching in ethics, history, technology assessment, and health policy. Before arriving at The George Washington University, he held teaching positions at Harvard University and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. He has written more than 120 books and essays. His articles have appeared in such publications as Journal of the American Medical Association, New England Journal of Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, American Journal of Public Health, Health Affairs, Hastings Center Report, Scientific American, and The New York Times.


TECHNOLOGICAL MEDICINE

The Changing World of Doctors and Patients

Stanley Joel Reiser

The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
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Cambridge University Press
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www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521835695

© Stanley Joel Reiser 2009

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2009

Printed in the United States of America

A catalog record for this publication is available from the British Library.

Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication dataReiser, Stanley Joel.Technological medicine : the changing world of doctors and patients /Stanley Joel Reiser.p. ; cm.Includes bibliographical references and index.ISBN 978-0-521-83569-5 (hardback)1. Medical innovations. 2. Medical technology. I. Title.[DNLM: 1. Biomedical Technology – trends. 2. Biomedical Technology – history.3. History, Modern 1601–. W 82 R377e 2009]RA418.5.M4.R45 2009610.28′4 – dc22 2009010914

ISBN 978-0-521-83569-5 Hardback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party Internet Web sites referred to in this publication and does not guarantee that any content on such Web sites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


Remembering: Sylvia and Harry Reiser and I. Bernard Cohen

Celebrating: Katharyn, Traci, Adam, Vanessa, Thomas, Caroline, and Tessa


Contents

List of Illustrations
ix
List of Tables
xi
Preface
xiii
1.    Revealing the Body's Whispers: How the Stethoscope Transformed Medicine
1
2.    Enigmatic Pictures: How Patients and Doctors Encountered the X-Ray
14
3.    Lifesaving but Unaffordable: The Improbable Journey of the Artificial Kidney
31
4.    Promising Rescue, Preventing Release: The Double Edge of the Artificial Respirator
52
5.    The Quest to Unify Health Care through the Patient Record
74
6.    Putting Technologies on Trial: From Bloodletting to Antibiotics to the Oregon Initiative
105
7.    Amid the Technological Triumphs of Disease Prevention: Where Is Health?
129
8.    The Technological Transformation of Birth
158
9.    Governing the Empire of Machines
186
Notes
205
Index
223

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

1.    Laennec, inventor of the stethoscope (1824).
6
2.    The first X-ray of a human being (1895).
15
3.    Muscles of the body, from the text of Vesalius (1543).
16
4.    Hooke's depiction of cellular structure (1665).
17
5.    Röntgen's X-ray through metal (1895).
22
6.    Dialysis using a Kolff-Brigham artificial kidney (1951–1952).
38
7.    Philip Drinker and a chalk drawing of a respirator (ca. 1930).
54
8.    Construction and demonstration of an early iron lung (1927).
56
9.    A child in a respirator (ca. early 1930s).
57
10.   A room-sized respirator at the Children's Hospital in Boston (ca. early 1930s).
58
11.   Codman's life history reduced to a chart (1934).
81
12.   The Back Bay Golden Goose–Ostrich Cartoon (1934).
83
13.   The therapy of bloodletting (1804).
107
14.   A patient being mesmerized (1794).
114
15.   Technology as a spur to disease prevention (ca. 1940).
147
16.   “The race with death,” mortality rates of tuberculosis, syphilis, and cancer (1926).
148
17.   A birth stool and fetal positions in the womb (1545).
161
18.   Delivering babies wholly by touch (1711).
165
19.   The Chamberlen obstetric forceps (1813).
167
20.   A hybrid portrait of male and female birthing practitioners (1795).
170
21.   Maternal mortality trends, 1880–1960.
181
22.   The automatic contact ultrasound scanner (1959).
196
23.   A five-month-old fetus depicted through ultrasound (2008).
198
24.   The ultrasound postage stamp (1994).
198



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