Cambridge Catalogue  
  • Help
Home > Catalogue > Emotions and Multilingualism
Emotions and Multilingualism
Google Book Search

Search this book

Details

  • 7 tables
  • Page extent: 320 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.64 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 306.44/6
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: P115 .P385 2005
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Multilingualism
    • Emotions
    • Psycholinguistics
    • Sociolinguistics

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521843614 | ISBN-10: 0521843618)




Contents

List of Tables page ix
Preface xi
1   Languages and emotions: What can a multilingual perspective contribute? 1
    1.1. The perils of the monolingual bias 3
    1.2. Bi- and multilingualism 5
    1.3. Problems and challenges in cross-linguistic research on language and emotions 12
    1.4. Conclusions 21
2   Emotions in the study of multilingualism: Framing the questions 22
    2.1. Bilingualism and psychopathology 23
    2.2. Polyglot psychoanalysis 28
    2.3. Language attitudes 31
    2.4. Language learning and anxiety 32
    2.5. Emotions and multilingualism 35
    2.6. Webquestionnaire study “Bilingualism and Emotions” 39
    2.7. The structure of this book 41
3   Vocal level: Is the lady angry? 44
    3.1. Vocal cues to emotional expression 45
    3.2. Identification of emotions in vocal expression in another language 55
    3.3. Interpretation of emotions in intercultural communication 64
    3.4. Factors affecting interpretation of vocal expression of emotions 68
    3.5. Conclusions and implications for future research 74
4   Semantic and conceptual levels: The bilingual mental lexicon 77
    4.1. Emotion words and concepts 78
    4.2. Cross-linguistic studies of emotion lexicons 86
    4.3. Emotion words: Representation, processing, and semantic networks 92
    4.4. Emotion concepts: Identification and categorization 99
    4.5. Factors affecting the structure of the bilingual emotion lexicon 106
    4.6. Conclusions and implications for future research 107
5   Discursive level: I feel zhalko tebia bednogo 112
    5.1. Emotions in discourse 113
    5.2. Cross-linguistic differences in affective repertoires 116
    5.3. Multilinguals’ affective repertoires 124
    5.4. Language choice in emotional expression 131
    5.5. Proficiency and self-expression 141
    5.6. Factors influencing bilinguals’ affective styles 145
    5.7. Conclusions and implications for future research 147
6   Neurophysiological level: His coeur is where his feelings dwell 151
    6.1. Language embodiment 153
    6.2. Language choice and code-switching in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy 158
    6.3. Emotionality of taboo words in different languages 168
    6.4. Bilingualism, emotions, and autobiographic memory 175
    6.5. Translingual writers: A case study in emancipatory detachment 179
    6.6. Factors affecting perceived language emotionality 184
    6.7. Conclusions and implications for future research 187
7   Social cognition: I no longer wanted to speak German 192
    7.1. Identities, emotions, and linguistic decision making 193
    7.2. German Jews and the Holocaust: A case study in first language rejection 200
    7.3. Second language learning and desire 209
    7.4. Second language learning and negative emotions 215
    7.5. Identities, languages, and emotions 220
    7.6. Conclusions and implications for future research 224
8   Emotions and multilingualism: An integrated perspective 227
    8.1. Emotions as inner states: Insights from multilingualism 228
    8.2. Emotions as relational processes: Insights from multilingualism 229
    8.3. Sociolinguistics of multilingualism: Insights from emotion research 233
    8.4. Psycholinguistics of the multilingual lexicon: Insights from emotion research 236
    8.5. Multilingual participants: Data collection, reporting, and analysis 240
Appendix A: Bilingualism and emotions webquestionnaire 247
Appendix B: Transcription conventions 257
References 259
Author Index 291
Subject Index 299

printer iconPrinter friendly version AddThis