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Essentials of Modern Spectrum Management

Details

  • Page extent: 278 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.58 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 621.3822
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: n/a
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Wireless communication systems
    • Wireless communication systems--Economic aspects
    • Radio frequency allocation
    • Signal processing

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521876698)

Essentials of Modern Spectrum Management Cambridge University Press
9780521876698 - ESSENTIALS OF MODERN SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT - by Martin Cave, Chris Doyle and William Webb
Table of Contents


Contents

Acknowledgementspage xi

I

Emerging problems with the current spectrum management approach
1

1

Current spectrum management methods and their shortcomings
3
      1.1  Why spectrum needs to be managed3
      1.2  The current management mechanisms4
      1.3  Shortcomings of the current system6
      1.4  Alternative management approaches8
      1.5  How this book addresses the new approaches9
      Reference9

2

How changing technology is impacting spectrum management
11
      2.1  Technology used to lend itself to discrete allocations11
      2.2  Multi-modal radios12
      2.3  Cognitive and software defined radios13
      2.4  Ultra-wideband20
      2.5  Summary23

3

Alternative ways of dividing spectrum
25
      3.1  Spectrum has been divided by frequency25
      3.2  UWB raises the possibility of division by power26
      3.3  Other divisions are also possible33
      3.4  Summary: in practice, changes to spectrum division would be minor34

II

Markets
35

4

Market solutions
37
      4.1  Introduction37
      4.2  Market methods38
      4.3  Market failures40
      4.4  Conclusion41

5

Auctions
43
      5.1  Introduction43
      5.2  Auctions versus administrative methods of assignment46
      5.3  Theory of auctions49
      5.4  Auction formats51
      5.5  Auction logistics76
      5.6  Conclusion81
      References82

6

Spectrum trading: secondary markets
85
      6.1  Introduction85
      6.2  Radio spectrum and market forces87
      6.3  Spectrum trading, markets and efficiency88
      6.4  Objections to spectrum trading92
      6.5  The implementation of spectrum trading in the UK94
      6.6  Trading in other countries97
      6.7  Conclusion103
      References104

7

Technical issues with property rights
105
      7.1  Introduction105
      7.2  Key elements of property rights106
      7.3  The problem of deployment density110
      7.4  Calculating noise floor levels112
      7.5  Making a property rights system work in practice112
      7.6  UWB and property rights115
      7.7  Managing interference116
      7.8  A detailed look at the definition of property rights117
      7.9  Summary121
      References122

8

Economic issues with property rights
123
      8.1  Creating property rights: economic aspects123
      8.2  Principles for the allocation of property rights124
      8.3  Underlays and overlays128
      8.4  Defining property rights for spectrum: commercial and economic issues131
      8.5  Conclusion136
      References137

9

Competition issues relating to spectrum
139
      9.1  Introduction139
      9.2  Competition issues in a command-and- control regime141
      9.3  Competition issues under a market regime for spectrum management143
      9.4  Spectrum caps147
      9.5  Conclusions148

10

Band management
151
      10.1  Introduction151
      10.2  Types of band manager152
      10.3  Fundamentals of band management154
      10.4  The business case for band management157
      10.5  Summary and conclusions163
      Reference164

III

Regulation
165

11

Incentive based spectrum prices: theory
167
      11.1  Introduction167
      11.2  Economic efficiency and radio spectrum169
      11.3  Productive efficiency and radio spectrum171
      11.4  Pricing radio spectrum to achieve economic efficiency174
      11.5  The Smith–NERA method of calculating spectrum prices175
      11.6  Setting spectrum prices to achieve efficiency using the Smith–NERA method178
      11.7  The interaction between spectrum pricing and spectrum trading181
      11.8  Conclusion184
      References185

12

Incentive based spectrum pricing: practicalities
187
      12.1  Introduction187
      12.2  Applying administrative incentive prices: some issues188
      12.3  Calculating AIP in practice: case study of fixed links in the UK193
      12.4  Incentive based spectrum charges in other countries199
      12.5  Conclusion200
      References202

13

How the commons works
203
      13.1  Introduction203
      13.2  The economics of the commons204
      13.3  The likelihood of congestion in radio spectrum209
      13.4  Quasi-commons: UWB and cognitive radio220
      13.5  Summary220
      References221

14

Commons or non-commons?
223
      14.1  Introduction223
      14.2  The use of market mechanisms to determine the amount of spectrum commons223
      14.3  The “total spectrum needed” approach224
      14.4  The “band-by-band” approach225
      14.5  Summary229

15

Is public sector spectrum management different?
231
      15.1  Introduction231
      15.2  Is public sector spectrum special?232
      15.3  Intermediate steps to encourage efficiency in public sector spectrum use234
      15.4  Public sector incentive problems237
      15.5  Conclusions238
      References238

16

Are developing countries different?
239
      16.1  Introduction239
      16.2  Consequences for spectrum management239
      16.3  Conclusion242
      References242

IV

Conclusions
245

17

Conclusions
247
      17.1  A reminder of the problem247
      17.2  Key conclusions247
      17.3  In summary252

Further reading
253
Abbreviations257
Author biographies259
Subject index263



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