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Multimedia Networking

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  • 6 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 568 pages
  • Size: 247 x 174 mm
  • Weight: 1.26 kg

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521882040)

Multimedia Networking
Cambridge University Press
9780521882040 - Multimedia Networking - From Theory to Practice - By Jenq-Neng Hwang
Frontmatter/Prelims

Multimedia Networking: From Theory to Practice

This authoritative guide to multimedia networking is the first to provide a complete system design perspective based on existing international standards and state-of-the-art networking and infrastructure technologies, from theoretical analyses to practical design considerations.

The four most critical components involved in a multimedia networking system – data compression, quality of service (QoS), communication protocols, and effective digital rights management – are intensively addressed. Many real-world commercial systems and prototypes are also introduced, as are software samples and integration examples, allowing readers to understand the practical tradeoffs in the real-world design of multimedia architectures and to get hands-on experience in learning the methodologies and design procedures.

Balancing just the right amount of theory with practical design and integration knowledge, this is an ideal book for graduate students and researchers in electrical engineering and computer science, and also for practitioners in the communications and networking industry. Furthermore, it can be used as a textbook for specialized graduate-level courses on multimedia networking.

Jenq-Neng Hwang is a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle. He has published over 240 technical papers and book chapters in the areas of image and video signal processing, computational neural networks, multimedia system integration, and networking. A Fellow of the IEEE since 2001, Professor Hwang has given numerous tutorial and keynote speeches for various international conferences as well as short courses in multimedia networking and machine learning at universities and research laboratories.


Multimedia Networking

From Theory to Practice

Jenq-Neng Hwang

University of Washington, Seattle


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
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Cambridge University Press
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Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

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Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521882040

© Cambridge University Press 2009

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2009

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalog record for this publication is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication data

Hwang, Jenq-Neng.
Multimedia networking : from theory to practice / Jenq-Neng Hwang.
p.cm.
Includes bibliographical references.
ISBN 978-0-521-88204-0 (hardback)
1. Multimedia systems.2. Computer networks.I. Title.
QA76.575.H86 2009
006.7–dc22
2008053943

ISBN 978-0-521-88204-0 hardback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


To my wife Ming-Ying, my daughter Jaimie, and my son Jonathan, for their endless love and support.


Contents

Preface
xi
Acknowledgements
xii
List of abbreviations
xiii
1       Introduction to multimedia networking
1
1.1     Paradigm shift of digital media delivery
1
1.2     Telematics: infotainment in automobiles
5
1.3     Major components of multimedia networking
7
1.4     Organization of the book
9
References
9
2       Digital speech coding
11
2.1     LPC modeling and vocoder
13
2.2     Regular pulse excitation with long-term prediction
16
2.3     Code-excited linear prediction (CELP)
18
2.4     Multiple-pulse-excitation coding
21
References
24
3       Digital audio coding
26
3.1     Human psychoacoustics
28
3.2     Subband signal processing and polyphase filter implementation
33
3.3     MPEG-1 audio layers
37
3.4     Dolby AC3 audio codec
45
3.5     MPEG-2 Advanced Audio Coding (AAC)
49
3.6     MPEG-4 AAC (HE-AAC)
54
References
60
4       Digital image coding
62
4.1     Basics of information theory for image compression
63
4.2     Entropy coding
64
4.3     Lossy image compression
69
4.4     Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG)
71
4.5     JPEG2000
84
References
105
5       Digital video coding
107
5.1     Evolution of digital video coding
108
5.2     Compression techniques for digital video coding
112
5.3     H.263 and H.263+ video coding
125
5.4     MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 video coding
131
5.5     MPEG-4 video coding and H.264/AVC
144
5.6     H.264/MPEG-4 AVC
153
5.7     Window Media Video 9 (WMV-9)
165
5.8     Scalable extension of H.264/AVC by HHI
172
References
178
6       Digital multimedia broadcasting
181
6.1     Moving from DVB-T to DVB-H
183
6.2     T-DMB multimedia broadcasting for portable devices
189
6.3     ATSC for North America terrestrial video broadcasting
193
6.4     ISDB digital broadcasting in Japan
198
References
199
7       Multimedia quality of service of IP networks
202
7.1     Layered Internet protocol (IP)
202
7.2     IP quality of service
210
7.3     QoS mechanisms
213
7.4     IP multicast and application-level multicast (ALM)
226
7.5     Layered multicast of scalable media
245
References
254
8       Quality of service issues in streaming architectures
257
8.1     QoS mechanisms for multimedia streaming
259
8.2     Windows Media streaming technology by Microsoft
281
8.3     SureStream streaming technology by RealNetworks
283
8.4     Internet protocol TV (IPTV)
287
References
297
9       Wireless broadband and quality of service
301
9.1     Evolution of 3G technologies
303
9.2     Wi-Fi wireless LAN (802.11)
316
9.3     QoS enhancement support of 802.11
330
9.4     Worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX)
342
9.5     Internetworking between 802.16 and 802.11
360
References
362
10      Multimedia over wireless broadband
365
10.1    End-to-end transport error control
366
10.2    Error resilience and power control at the source coding layer
377
10.3    Multimedia over wireless mesh
380
10.4    Wireless VoIP and scalable video
385
References
405
11      Digital rights management of multimedia
410
11.1    A generic DRM architecture
411
11.2    Encryption
414
11.3    Digital watermarking
437
11.4    MPEG-21
445
References
465
12      Implementations of multimedia networking
467
12.1    Speech and audio compression module
467
12.2    Image and video compression module
479
12.3    IP networking module
490
12.4    Audio and video capturing and displaying
497
12.5    Encoding and decoding of video or audio
510
12.6    Building a client–server video streaming system
520
12.7    Creating a small P2P video conferencing system
532
Index
538




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