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The Christian Parthenon

Details

  • 26 b/w illus. 2 maps
  • Page extent: 268 pages
  • Size: 247 x 174 mm
  • Weight: 0.71 kg

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521882286)

The Christian Parthenon
Cambridge University Press
9780521882286 - The Christian Parthenon - Classicism and Pilgrimage in Byzantine Athens - By Anthony Kaldellis
Table of Contents

Contents

List of figures
vii
Preface
xi
Acknowledgments
xv
Introduction
1
Byzantine Athens: a city with no history?
1
1.            Conversions of the Parthenon
11
The Parthenon in antiquity: a reassessment
11
The pagan Parthenon in late antiquity
19
From temple to church
23
Triumph or continuity?
31
What happened at Athens?
40
The Theosophy oracle on the Parthenon
47
St. Paul in Athens
53
2.            From students to pilgrims in medieval Athens (ad 532–848)
60
The collapse of the late Roman city
60
Traveling to Athens in the Dark Age
63
Athens and Constantinople
72
Inscriptions of the Christian Parthenon
74
3.            Imperial recognition: Basileios II in Athens (ad 1018)
81
An emperor in Athens
81
Interpreting imperial pilgrimage
86
4.            Pilgrims of the middle period (ad 900–1100)
92
Murder in the Parthenon
92
Loukas of Steiris
96
Nikon “Repent!”
97
Phantinos the Younger
101
Meletios the Younger and the rehabilitation of Athena
103
Saewulf, Guido, and the light of Athens
107
5.            The apogee of the Atheniotissa in the twelfth century
112
Athens in the twelfth century
113
Georgios Bourtzes (1153–1160)
122
Nikolaos Hagiotheodorites (1160–1175)
125
Pilgrims and the piety of the Athenians
129
The festival of the Atheniotissa
133
Brand-naming and exporting the Atheniotissa
137
6.            Michael Choniates: a classicist-bishop and his cathedral (ad 1182–1205)
145
The Parthenon as consolation
145
The Parthenon in the late twelfth century
149
Choniates between past and present
156
Leon Sgouros (1204) and the end of Byzantine Athens
162
7.            Why the Parthenon? An attempt at interpretation
166
The mysterious success of Christian Athens
166
Athens’ meager Christian credentials
168
Deconstructing the Christian Parthenon
173
Ancient ruins and the Byzantine beholder: a view of the “sights” in Greece
178
Conclusion: archaeology, polysemy, success
191
8.            The light of the Christian Parthenon
196
Postscript: some Byzantine heresies
207
Appendix: the Little Metropolis
212
Bibliography
215
Index
249



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