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Distorted Ideals in Greek Vase-Painting

Details

  • Page extent: 450 pages
  • Size: 253 x 177 mm
  • Weight: 1.3 kg

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521896412)

Distorted Ideals in Greek Vase-Painting: The World of Mythological Burlesque
Cambridge University Press
9780521896412 - Distorted Ideals in Greek Vase-Painting: The World of Mythological Burlesque - By David Walsh
Table of Contents

Contents

List of Illustrations
ix
List of Abbreviations
xvii
Acknowledgements
xxi
Preface
xxv
Part One  
1.        Introduction
3
1.1       Corinthian Komos Vases
11
1.2       The Caeretan Hydriai
12
1.3       ‘Phlyax’ Vases
13
1.4       The Kabeirion Group
14
1.5       The ‘Sam Wide’ Group
16
1.6       Satyr Vases
16
1.7       Grotesques, Pygmies, and Friends
17
1.8       Crude, Unlovely, and Unsophisticated – Moi?
18
2.        Greek Humour: Dramatic, Artistic, Religious, and Social Contexts
24
Part Two  
3.        Strange Beginnings
37
3.1       Burlesque Asides: ‘Stone-Throwers’ and Monkeys
39
3.2       Geranomachiae and the François Vase
48
3.3       Festivals, Sacred Celebrations, and Death
58
3.4       Discussion
64
4.        Violating the Sanctuary
72
4.1       The Parody of Telephos (Würzburg H 5697) and ‘Phlyax’ Vases
74
4.2       Scenes of Rape and Molestation
79
4.3       Scenes of Theft from the Sanctuary
89
4.4       Scenes of Death
94
4.5       Discussion
98
5.        Ridiculing the Gods
105
5.1       Hephaistos – The Lame Cuckold
107
5.2       Zeus – Supremely Ridiculous?
114
5.3       Apollo – Consultations and Confrontations
128
5.4       Femmes Fatales – A Birth, Three Judgements, an Abduction, and a Marriage
134
5.5       Fertility Gods – Vigorous Demands and Gentle Persuasion
143
5.6       Dionysos – The Enigmatic Straight Man
148
5.7       Discussion
156
6.        Subverting the Hero
165
6.1       Heroes, Monsters, and Other Troublesome Creatures
167
6.2       Heroic Cunning and Guile
192
6.3       Heroic Virtues: Admired or Travestied?
212
6.4       Heroic Appetites: Sex, Sustenance, and Sleep
223
6.5       Herakles – Switching Roles and Changing Status
233
6.6       Satyrs Masquerading as Heroes
238
6.7       Discussion
238
Part Three
7.        Distorted Bodies: Do the ‘Uglies’ Have the Last Laugh?
245
7.1       The Links to Costume and Drama
247
7.2       Does Size Matter?
253
7.3       The Origins of the Distorted Body
256
8.        Distribution: Being in with the In-Crowd
259
8.1       Patterns of Production
260
8.2       Favoured Characters and Myths
263
8.3       Acculturation and Taste
266
8.4       Local Pots for Local People
267
9.        Final Reflections: The World Reversed
274
9.1       Testing the Balance
275
9.2       Competition, Challenge, and Strength
277
9.3       Comedy in the Day-to-Day and Afterlife
278
9.4       The Wider World of Carnival, Burlesque, and Humour
281
9.5       Parting Glances
286
Appendix – Burlesque Material beyond Archaic and Classical Greece
289
The Catalogue
291
List of Catalogue Items by Fabric
329
Notes
331
Bibliography
383
Index of Vases
401
Index of Ancient Sources
405
General Index
409



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