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Indigenous Rights in the Age of the UN Declaration

Details

  • Page extent: 370 pages
  • Size: 229 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.49 kg

Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9781107417014)

Indigenous Rights in The Age of The UN Declaration
Cambridge University Press
9781107022447 - Indigenous Rights in The Age of The UN Declaration - Edited by Elvira Pulitano
Table of Contents

Contents

Notes on contributors
ix
Acknowledgments
xiv
Indigenous rights and international law: an introduction
Elvira Pulitano
1
1     Indigenous self-determination, culture, and land: a reassessment in light of the 2007 UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Siegfried Wiessner
31
2     Treaties, peoplehood, and self-determination: understanding the language of indigenous rights
Isabelle Schulte-Tenckhoff
64
3     Talking up Indigenous Peoples’ original intent in a space dominated by state interventions
Irene Watson And Sharon Venne
87
4     Australia’s Northern Territory Intervention and indigenous rights on language, education and culture: an ethnocidal solution to Aboriginal ‘dysfunction’?
Sheila Collingwood-Whittick
110
5     Articulating indigenous statehood: Cherokee state formation and implications for the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Clint Carroll
143
6     The freedom to pass and repass: can the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples keep the US–Canadian border ten feet above our heads?
Carrie E. Garrow
172
7     Traditional responsibility and spiritual relatives: protection of indigenous rights to land and sacred places
Kathleen J. Martin
198
8     Seeking the corn mother: transnational indigenous organizing and food sovereignty in Native North American literature
Joni Adamson
228
9     “Use and control”: issues of repatriation and redress in American Indian literature
Lee Schweninger
250
10    Contested ground: ‘āina, identity, and nationhood in Hawaii
Ku‘Ualoha Ho‘Omanawanui
276
11    Kānāwai, international law, and the discourse of indigenous justice: some reflections on the Peoples’ International Tribunal in Hawaii
Elvira Pulitano
299
Afterword:Implementing the Declaration
Mililani B. Trask
327
Index
337



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