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Republicanism, Rhetoric, and Roman Political Thought

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Republicanism, Rhetoric, and Roman Political Thought
Cambridge University Press
9781107000575 - Republicanism, Rhetoric, and Roman Political Thought - Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus - By Daniel J. Kapust
Index

Index

Agricola (Tacitus) 122, 134–7, 144, 146, 150, 165–6, 168

Allen, Danielle 18–19, 55, 79, 84, 110

Annals (Tacitus) 147–8, 150–1, 163–4, 166–8, 170

Arendt, Hannah 131

Areopagiticus (Isocrates) 87

Aristotle

on epideictic oratory 151, 153

on ethos 85

on freedom 112

on goodwill 86

on pathos 86

on political friendship 83

on redescription 57–8

on tyranny 104

on virtue and vice 57–8

auctoritas 4, 96–7

and libertas 4

senatus auctoritas 45

Austin, J.L. 18

avaritia.

See Livy, on avaritia, Sallust, on avaritia

Bartsch, Shadi 132

Batstone, William 75

benevolentia.

See Livy, on benevolentia, Cicero, on benevolentia, Rhetoric to Herennius, benevolentia in

Berlin, Isaiah 9

Book of the Courtier (Castiglione) 117

Brunt, P.A. 3, 96, 112

Brutus (Cicero) 1, 138

Carthage 41

See Sallust, on Carthage

Castiglione, Baldessare 117

Catiline, L.

See Sallust, on Catiline;, Hobbes, Thomas, on Catiline

Cato the Elder

and the destruction of Carthage 39, 41

Cato the Younger.

See Sallust, on Cato the Younger

Cato’s Letters (Trenchard) 112

Cicero

on Atticism 36

on benevolentia 87–8, 102, 105

on clementia 154–7

on concordia 73, 83

on dignitas 118

on eloquence’s relationship to peace 37

on epideictic oratory 151

on flattery 103, 107, 112

on friendship 102

on Hortensius 1

on love and fear 104–5

on mercy and leadership 154–7

on Numa Pompilius 73, 155

on prudentia 62

on redescription 62

on Romulus 73

on social and political conflict 76

on Socrates 116

on Tarquinius 104

on the development of Rome 73

on the Gracchi 107

on the honorable and the advantageous 62–3

on the lion and the fox 106

on the perfect orator 78

on the place of eloquence in the republic 1, 27

on the political role of the orator 114–18

on the rector rei publicae 101

on the relationship of eloquence to wisdom 116

on the tasks of the orator 34

on tyranny 104

on verecundia 101

Cincinnatus.

See Livy, on Cincinnatus

clementia.

See Sallust, on clementia, Cicero, on clementia, Seneca, on clementia, Pliny, on clementia, Tacitus, on clementia

concordia 86

See Livy, on concordia, Cicero, on concordia, Sallust, on concordia

Conflict of the Orders 76, 94

Connolly, Joy 21, 29, 44, 76–7

Considerations of the Causes of the Greatness of the Romans and their Decline (Montesquieu) 28

contio 44

Cox, Virginia 61

Dahl, Robert 14

deliberative democracy 14

deliberative oratory 47, 61–5

and the conflict between the honorable and the advantageous 61

Dialogue on Orators (Tacitus) 3, 123–9, 132–3, 169

dignitas 46, 66, 118, 137

and libertas 46

Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy (Machiavelli) 82–3, 146

Domitian 119–20

See Pliny, on Domitian, Tacitus, on Domitian, Suetonius, on Domitian

Domitian (Suetonius) 119

Downs, Anthony 14

Dyck, Andrew 155

epideictic oratory 151–3

exempla 23, 92, 102

Agricola as exemplum 134

Cato’s use of 70

in rhetoric 93

in Tacitus’ Histories 150

Livy’s use of 92

Fantham, Elaine 123

fear.

See Sallust, on collective fear, metus hostilis, Livy, on collective fear, political fear; See Polybius, on political fear

Federalist 1 (Hamilton) 4

flattery.

and servitude 112

See Pliny, on flattery, Cicero, on flattery, Plato, on flattery, Tacitus, on flattery

Fontana, Benedetto 44

For Marcellus (Cicero) 155–7

For Sulla (Cicero) 112

forensic oratory 47

friendship.

See Cicero, on friendship;, Aristotle, on political friendship

From the Founding of the City (Livy) 89–90, 92–103, 107–9

Garsten, Bryan 20–1, 56, 79

Garver, Eugene 86

Goldberg, Sander 123

goodwill.

and leadership 105–6

See Isocrates, on goodwill, Livy, on goodwill, Cicero, on benevolentia, Livy, on benevolentia, Rhetoric to Herennius, benevolentia in

Gorgias (Plato) 20, 130–1

Gracchi.

See Tacitus, on the Gracchi, Cicero, on the Gracchi, Sallust, on the Gracchi

Griffin, Mirriam 157

Habermas, Jurgen 14–16

Hammer, Dean 26, 82

Hamilton, Alexander 4

Herodotus

on the function of history 22

Histories (Herodotus) 22

Histories (Polybius) 23, 39, 149

Histories (Sallust) 49–50

Histories (Tacitus) 122, 147–8, 150, 169–70

History of the Peloponnesian War (Thucydides) 23, 40–1, 80

Hobbes, Thomas

his attitude towards rhetoric 33

his reading of Sallust 25, 32–4

on Catiline 33

on collective fear 43

on eloquence and logic 37

on Nero 171

on rhetoric and tumult 33

Hortensius 1

in utramque partem 78, 173

Institutes (Quintilian) 56–7, 121, 152, 160

Isocrates 86–7

on goodwill 86–7

Javitch, Daniel 117

Kant, Immanuel

on rhetoric 17

Konstan, David 155

Levene, D.S. 70, 77

Leviathan (Hobbes) 32, 43

libertas

and auctoritas 4

and Cremutius Cordus in Tacitus’ Annals 163

and dignitas 46

and eloquentia in Tacitus’ Histories 146

and free speech 3

and rule of law 99

and the example of Agricola 135

Camillus’ invocation of 107

in Tacitus’ Dialogue on Orators 125, 128

love of the people for 44

the Gracchi and 46

Life of Marcus Cato (Plutarch) 41

Life of Pericles (Plutarch) 149

Livy

compared to Machiavelli 82–3

compared to Sallust 90–1

on history as a visual monument 92

influence of 6–7

on Alexander 94

on avaritia 91

on benevolentia 97

on Brutus 99

on Camillus 89–90, 95

on Capitolinus 107

on Cincinnatus 91–2

on collective fear 94

on concordia 83, 89–90, 93, 95–6, 109

on goodwill 97

on goodwill and the observation of character 95–9, 108

on imperium 96–7

on love and fear in political relationships 98

on luxuria 91–2, 100, 102

on Menenius Agrippa 95, 108

on mores 89, 108

on Numa Pompilius 100–1

on piety 100

on shame and fear 96

on Tarquinius 98

on the Appii Claudii 96

on the body politic 95

on Valerius 102–3

his use of exempla 92

love and fear in political relationships 98, 153–62

Luce, T.J. 91, 148–9

luxuria.

See Sallust, on luxuria, Livy, on luxuria

Machiavelli, Niccolo

compared to Livy 82–3

on Caesar 146

on Catiline 146

MacIntyre, Alisdair 9

Madison, James 29

Manin, Bernard 16–17

Maternus.

compared to Socrates 132–3

See Tacitus, on Maternus

Mayer, Roland 137

metus hostilis 38–43, 91, 93, 95

See political fear, Sallust, on collective fear, Livy, on collective fear

Millar, Fergus 4

moderatio.

See Tacitus, on moderatio

Momigliano, Arnaldo 83

Mommsen, Theodor

on Sallust 34

Montesquieu, Charles de Secondat

Considerations of the Causes of the Greatness of the Romans and their Decline 28

mores.

See Livy, on mores

Nelson, Eric 13

Nicomachean Ethics (Aristotle) 57–8

Numa Pompilius.

See Cicero, on Numa Pompilius, Livy, on Numa Pompilius

On Duties (Cicero) 2, 104, 106

On Friendship (Cicero) 102, 105, 107, 112

On Invention (Cicero) 62–3

On Mercy (Seneca) 157–60

On the Agrarian Law (Cicero) 4

On the Citizen (Hobbes) 33, 37, 142, 171

On the Commonwealth (Cicero) 28, 71–3, 83, 101–2, 104

On the Ideal Orator (Cicero) 5, 27, 34–7, 61, 76, 78, 87–9, 93, 114–18, 152

On the Laws (Cicero) 96

On the Peace (Isocrates) 87

Orator (Cicero) 36, 88–9

Origins (Cato) 39

Pagán, Victoria 136

Panegyricus (Pliny) 120, 160–2

pathos.

See Aristotle, on pathos

Pettit, Philip 109

on common interests 21

on republican liberty 11

on servility 113

on the common good 13

Phaedrus (Plato) 59

Plato 19

attitude toward conventional rhetoric 19

on flattery 131

on redescription and moral corruption 59

on the contrast between philosophy and rhetoric 130

Pliny 142–4, 160–2

on clementia 160–2

on Domitian 160–2

on flattery 160

on history and oratory 142–4

on love and virtue 162

on Trajan 161–2

Plutarch

on Cato and Scipio Nasica 41

on Cato the Younger 136

on the difficulties of writing history 149

Pocock, J.G.A. 28

political fear 38–43

Politics (Aristotle) 104

Polybius

on flattering history 149

on political fear 39–40

on the function of history 23

on the Roman constitution 39–40

Posidonius 38–9

on the fall of Carthage 38

prudentia.

See Cicero, on prudentia, Tacitus, on prudentia

Quintilian 56–7, 61, 160

on epideictic oratory 152–3

on redescription 57

redescription.

See Aristotle, on redescription in, Cicero, on redescription, Rhetoric to Herennius, redescription, rhetoric, redescription, Plato, on redescription and moral corruption, Quintilian, on redescription

Remer, Gary 78

Republic (Plato) 59

republican political thought 8–13

and Roman political thought 9–11

civic virtue in 11–12, 29–30

common good in 12

corruption in 28

liberty in 9–11

perfectionist and political virtue in 29, 51

republican revival and 8

rhetoric

Allen on rhetoric and trust 19, 56

and antagonism 76

and goodwill 85–9, 105

and political theory 13–21

and Roman historiography 22–3

and Roman liberty 3

deliberative oratory 47, 61–5

epideictic oratory 151–3

ethos 85

exempla in 93

forensic oratory 47

Garsten on rhetoric and judgment 20–1, 56

Hobbes’s attitude towards 33

Kant’s attitude toward 17

pathos 86

Plato’s attitude toward conventional 19

redescription in 56–8, 63–5

Rhetoric (Aristotle) 57–8, 85–6, 112, 152

Rhetoric to Herennius 63–5

benevolentia in 87

on the honorable and the advantageous 63–5

redescription in 63–5

Roman political thought

revived interest in 8

Romilly, Jacqueline de 86

Romulus 76

See Cicero, on Romulus

Rousseau, Jean-Jacques 16

saevitia.

See Tacitus, on saevitia

Sallust

Cato and Caesar’s debate 65–70

compared to Cicero’s view of history 35–6

compared to Thucydides 47

contrasted to Livy 90–1

his comparison of Cato and Caesar 73–4

his relationship to Caesar 34

his relationship to Hobbes 25

his relationship to Thucydides 36

influence of 6–7

on antagonism 25, 31, 43–7, 74–7

on avaritia 42, 50, 60, 69

on Caesar 66–8, 73–4

on Carthage 30–1, 46–50

on Catiline 37, 45, 77–8

on Cato the Younger 68–70, 73–4

on clementia 66

on collective fear 42, 48–50

on concordia 42, 45–6, 48–50

on Fortune 43

on G. Memmius 44–5

on luxuria 69

on moral corruption 47, 49

on parties and factions 46

on the breakdown of dichotomies 48–50

on the corruption of language 45, 50

on the expulsion of Rome’s kings 29

on the Gracchi 46

Schofield, Malcolm 104

Schumpeter, Joseph 14

Second Philippic (Cicero) 139

Seneca 157–60

on Augustus 159

on clementia 157–60

on love and clementia 157–60

on Nero 158–9

on the distinction between emulation and fear 161

Skinner, Quentin

on redescription 57

on republican liberty 9–10

on republican virtue and corruption 12

on the common good 12

Socrates 130

compared to Maternus 132–3

See Cicero, on Socrates

Suetonius

on Domitian 119

Syme, Ronald 5, 75, 90, 134, 154

Tacitus

his comparison of Aper to Maternus 132

exempla in Histories 150

history as providing markers 26

influence of 6–7

on Agricola 134–7, 168

on Aper 124–5, 133

on Athens 128

on clementia 168

on Cordus 163–4

on Domitian 135–6, 144, 146, 165–6

on finding a middle path 170

on flattery 167

on history as judgment 26

on Maternus 3, 123–9

on moderatio 134

on Nerva 122

on poetry and eloquence 125

on prudentia 26, 135

on reading the character of rulers 151, 170–1

on saevitia 166–7

on Sparta and Crete 138–9

on the context of eloquence 126–9

on the dilemmas facing historians 146–8

on the Gracchi 129

on the principate and historiography 146–7

on Tiberius 166–8, 170

on Vespasian 168

on writing history 149–51

tensions in speeches of Maternus 132

Thucydides

Diodotus 66, 68, 80

his relationship to Sallust 36

on political fear 40–1

on the Corcyrean stasis 40

on the distortion of language 41

on the function of history 22

Tiberius.

See Tacitus, on Tiberius

Trenchard, John 112

Tusculan Disputations (Cicero) 123

tyranny 104–5

War with Catiline (Sallust) 42–3, 45–6, 48–9, 60, 65–71, 73–4, 79

War with Jugurtha (Sallust) 43–4, 46, 48–9, 60

Weithman, Paul 30, 51

Wiedemann, Thomas 24

Wirszubski, Chaim 96, 154

Wisse, Jakob 117




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