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Staying Roman

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  • 5 b/w illus. 5 maps 29 tables
  • Page extent: 458 pages
  • Size: 229 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.61 kg

Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9781107530720)

Staying Roman
Cambridge University Press
9780521196970 - Staying Roman - Conquest and Identity in Africa and the Mediterranean, 439–700 - By Jonathan Conant
Frontmatter/Prelims

Staying Roman

What did it mean to be Roman once the Roman empire had collapsed in the West? Staying Roman examines Roman identities in the region of modern Tunisia and Algeria between the fifth-century Vandal conquest and the seventh-century Islamic invasions. Using historical, archaeological, and epigraphic evidence, this study argues that the fracturing of the empire's political unity also led to a fracturing of Roman identity along political, cultural, and religious lines, as individuals who continued to feel ‘Roman’ but who were no longer living under imperial rule sought to redefine what it was that connected them to their fellow Romans elsewhere. The resulting definitions of Romanness could overlap, but were not always mutually reinforcing. Significantly, in late antiquity, Romanness had a practical value, and could be used in remarkably flexible ways to foster a sense of similarity or difference over space, time, and ethnicity, in a wide variety of circumstances.

Jonathan Conant is Assistant Professor of History at Brown University, where his teaching and research focus on the early medieval Mediterranean.


Fourth Series

Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought

General Editor:

Rosamond Mckitterick
Professor of Medieval History, University of Cambridge, and Fellow of Sidney Sussex College

Advisory Editors:

Christine Carpenter
Professor of Medieval English History, University of Cambridge

Jonathan Shepard

The series Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought was inaugurated by G. G. Coulton in 1921; Professor Rosamond McKitterick now acts as General Editor of the Fourth Series, with Professor Christine Carpenter and Dr Jonathan Shepard as Advisory Editors. The series brings together outstanding work by medieval scholars over a wide range of human endeavour extending from political economy to the history of ideas.

A list of titles in the series can be found at: www.cambridge.org/medievallifeandthought


Staying Roman

Conquest and Identity in Africa and the Mediterranean, 439–700

Jonathan Conant


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo, Delhi, Mexico City

Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521196970

© Jonathan Conant 2012

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2012

Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge

A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication data

Conant, Jonathan, 1974–
Staying Roman : conquest and identity in Africa and the Mediterranean, 439–700 / Jonathan Conant.
p.cm. – (Cambridge studies in medieval life and though: fourth series ; 82)
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-521-19697-0 (hardback)
1. Romans – Africa, North.2. Africa, North – History – To 647.3. National characteristics, Roman.4. Africa, North – Civilization – Roman influences.5. Africa, North – Antiquities, Roman.6. Inscriptions, Latin – Africa, North.I. Title.
DT170.C652012
939′.704 – dc232011047925

ISBN 978-0-521-19697-0 Hardback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


To Vanessa


Contents

List of figures
viii
List of maps
ix
List of tables
x
Acknowledgements
xii
List of abbreviations
xv
Introduction
1
1     The legitimation of Vandal power
19
2     Flight and communications
67
3     The old ruling class under the Vandals
130
4     New Rome, new Romans
196
5     The Moorish alternative
252
6     The dilemma of dissent
306
7     Aftermath
362
Conclusions
371
Bibliography
379
Index
420

Figures

2.1         Africans abroad, 439–533: churchmen and laity
69
2.2         Africans abroad, 439–533: occupations
69
2.3         Africans abroad, 439–533: distribution over time (by group)
76
2.4         The names Adeodatus and Benenatus in dated Italian inscriptions, 350–599 (CIL and ICVR n.s.)
123
2.5         The names Adeodatus and Benenatus, 410–534 in PCBE 2 (Italy)
124

Maps

1.1         The Mediterranean world
20
1.2         Late antique North Africa, 439–700
22
1.3         ‘Vandals’ in North Africa? archaeological evidence
50
2.1         Africans abroad in the Mediterranean, 439–533
77
2.2         Latin ‘African’ names in Mediterranean inscriptions (CIL only)
120

Tables

1.1         Roman embassies to the Vandals, 455–84
30
2.1         Africans abroad, c.439–c.533: Constantinople and Chalcedon
78
2.2         Africans abroad, c.439–c.533: The East other than Constantinople and Chalcedon
82
2.3         Africans abroad, c.439–c.533: Rome
83
2.4         Africans abroad, c.439–c.533: The West other than Rome
84
2.5         Travel from the African interior to the nearest port, c.439–c.533
96
2.6         The travels of Fulgentius of Ruspe, c.484–c.532
101
2.7         Comparison of nine names in PCBE 1–2 (Africa and Italy) before the Vandal capture of Carthage, c.300–439
116
2.8         Comparison of nine names in PLRE 1–2 before the Vandal capture of Carthage, c.260–c.439
117
2.9         Comparison of nine names in PLRE 2–3 in the Vandal period, c.439–533
117
2.10        Comparison of nine names in PCBE 2 (Italy) before and after the Vandal capture of Carthage
118
2.11        Adeodatus/Adeodata: comparison between provinces (CIL only)
121
2.12        Adeodatus/Adeodata: Rome (ICVR n.s. only)
121
2.13        Benenatus/Benenata: comparison between provinces (CIL only)
121
2.14        Benenatus/Benanata: Rome (ICVR n.s. only)
122
2.15        Adeodatus/-a and Benenatus/-a beyond Africa: dated inscriptions
123
3.1         Romano-African families in the late Roman and Vandal administration
146
3.2         Consular and Imperial dating systems in late Roman Africa, c.407–54
151
3.3         Vandal regnal dates in African inscriptions
153
3.4         Anno and Anno Karthaginensis dates in African inscriptions
154
4.1         Supreme commanders of the Byzantine forces in Africa: regional origins
202
4.2         Praetorian prefects of Byzantine Africa: regional origins
204
4.3         Constantinople to Africa: late ancient itineraries
215
4.4         Supreme commanders of the Byzantine forces in Africa: previous careers
218
4.5         Duces of Egypt, c.538–641: previous and subsequent careers
221
4.6         Sixth- and seventh-century commanders in Africa: previous careers
227
4.7         Early commanders in Africa: previous careers
229
4.8         Subordinate commanders in Italy: terms of appointment
238
5.1         Secular office-holders in Moorish Africa, fifth to seventh centuries: the epigraphic evidence
293



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