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Enacting European Citizenship

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  • Page extent: 252 pages
  • Size: 229 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.34 kg

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 (ISBN-13: 9781316502853)

Enacting European Citizenship
Cambridge University Press
9781107033962 - Enacting European Citizenship - Edited by Engin F. Isin and Michael Saward
Frontmatter/Prelims

Enacting European Citizenship

What does it mean to be a European citizen? The rapidly changing politics of citizenship in the face of migration, diversity, heightened concerns about security and financial and economic crises, has left European citizenship as one of the major political and social challenges to European integration. Enacting European Citizenship develops a distinctive perspective on European citizenship and its impact on European integration by focusing on ‘acts’ of European citizenship. The authors examine a broad range of cases – including those of the Roma, Sinti, Kurds, sex workers, youth and other ‘minorities’ or marginalised peoples – to illuminate the ways in which the institutions and practices of European citizenship can hinder as well as enable claims for justice, rights and equality. This book draws the key themes together to explore what the limitations and possibilities of European citizenship might be.

Engin F. Isin is a professor of Politics and International Studies at the Open University. He has published widely on the politics of citizenship, including Cities Without Citizens (1992), Being Political (2002) and Citizens Without Frontiers (2012).

Michael Saward is a professor of Politics at the University of Warwick. He has published widely on democratic theory, including The Representative Claim (2010), Democracy (2003) and the edited volume Democratic Innovation (2000).


Enacting European Citizenship

Edited by

Engin F. Isin and Michael Saward


CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
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Cambridge University Press
The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK

Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York

www.cambridge.org
Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9781107033962

© Cambridge University Press 2013

This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press.

First published 2013

Printed and bound in the United Kingdom by the MPG Books Group

A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library

Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication data

Enacting European citizenship / edited by Engin F. Isin and Michael Saward.
pages cm
ISBN 978-1-107-03396-2 (hardback)
1. Citizenship – Europe. 2. Citizenship – Social aspects – Europe. 3. Group
identity – Political aspects – Europe. 4. Nationalism – Europe.
5. Democracy – Europe. 6. Europe – Politics and government. 7. Europe – Social policy. I. Isin, Engin F. (Engin Fahri), 1959–
JN40.E65 2013
323.6094–dc23
2012042711

ISBN 978-1-107-03396-2 Hardback

Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.


Contents

Contributors
vii
Preface
ix
1     Questions of European citizenship
Engin F. Isin and Michael Saward
1
2     Claiming European citizenship
Engin F. Isin
19
3     Acts of citizenship as methodology
Rutvica Andrijasevic
47
4     Enacting European citizenship beyond the EU: Turkish citizens and their European political practices
Bahar Rumelili and Fuat Keyman
66
5     Negotiating otherness: Mozaika and sexual citizenship
Kristīne Krūma and Ivars Indāns
84
6     Acts of citizenship deprivation: ruptures between citizen and state
Sandra Mantu and Elspeth Guild
111
7     Mobility interrogating free movement: Roma acts of European citizenship
Claudia Aradau, Jef Huysmans, P. G. Macioti and Vicki Squire
132
8     Sites and the scales of the law: third-country nationals and EU Roma citizens
Ayşe Çağlar and Sebastian Mehling
155
9     European citizenship revealed: sites, actors and Roma access to justice in the EU
Anaïs Faure Atger
178
10    Exceeding categories: law, bureaucracy and acts of citizenship by asylum seekers in Hungary
Prem Kumar Rajaram and Zsuzsanna Arendas
195
11    Enacting citizenship and democracy in Europe
Michael Saward
220
Index
238

Contributors

Rutvica Andrijasevic is a lecturer in Employment Studies at the Centre for Labour Market Studies at Leicester University, UK.

Claudia Aradau is a senior lecturer in International Relations in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London, UK.

Zsuzsanna Arendas is a researcher at the Museum of Ethnography, Budapest, Hungary.

Anaïs Faure Atger is a senior migration advisor at the Red Cross, EU office, Belgium.

Ayşe Çağlar is a professor of Cultural and Social Anthropology in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Vienna, Austria.

Elspeth Guild is a professor of European Immigration Law at Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.

Jef Huysmans is a professor of Security Studies in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the Open University, UK.

Ivars Indāns is a project researcher at the Riga Graduate School of Law, Latvia.

Engin F. Isin is a professor of Politics and International Studies in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the Open University, UK.

Fuat Keyman is a professor of International Relations at Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Kristīne Krūma is a visiting lecturer in Public International Law and EU Law at the Riga Graduate School of Law, Latvia.

P. G. Macioti is a doctoral student in Politics and International Studies at the Open University, UK.

Sandra Mantu is a doctoral student in the Faculty of Law at Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.

Sebastian Mehling is a lecturer in Comparative Political Sociology at Europa-Universität Viadrina in Frankfurt, Germany.

Prem Kumar Rajaram is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at the Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.

Bahar Rumelili is an assistant professor in the Department of International Relations at Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Michael Saward is a professor of Politics at the University of Warwick, UK.

Vicki Squire is an associate professor in International Security in the Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick, UK.


Preface

Our goal in this book has been to develop a distinctive perspective on the emerging European citizenship and its impact on European integration. The rapidly changing politics of citizenship in the face of migration, diversity, heightened concerns about security and financial and economic crises has positioned European citizenship at the forefront of political and social challenges to European integration. The book arises from a three-year project (2008–10) called Enacting European Citizenship, funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) section and directed by Engin Isin. The project, known as ENACT, was led by the Open University in the UK and included researchers from Radboud University (Nijmegen, Netherlands), Central European University (Budapest, Hungary), Koç University (Istanbul, Turkey), The Centre for European Policy Studies (Brussels, Belgium) and Riga Graduate School of Law (Riga, Latvia).

The book’s perspective on European citizenship is built upon a focus on ‘acts’ of European citizenship, not least acts of those whose citizenship is precarious and contested. A series of investigations into Roma, Sinti, Kurds, sex workers, the youth and other ‘minorities’ or marginalised peoples illuminates the ways in which institutions and practices of European citizenship enable or hinder claims for justice, rights and equality. We have also examined acts of citizenship with respect to the European Court of Justice and other key European institutions, and provided a comparative study of how some EU member states enact policies to deprive their citizens of the rights that they are (or should be) entitled to. The project assessed European citizenship in two key ways: (1) through analysing acts of citizenship by institutions, and by people who may or may not have formal citizenship status, and (2) by analysing political as well as legal claims to citizenship. Behind both approaches is the idea that any concept of citizenship contains tensions – European citizenship is certainly no exception. The book provides a focused and selective account of the findings of these investigations, drawing key themes together into what we hope readers will find to be an illuminating and perhaps provocative whole.

We are grateful to the European Commission’s FP7 for funding the project, and we thank in particular our project officer, Angela Liberatore, for her invaluable support and guidance. The Open University was a most hospitable research environment in which to coordinate a large research project. The university’s financial and management contributions helped us to achieve results that would not have been possible with support from FP7 alone. Similarly, the Faculty of Social Sciences and its research office (Mark Wight, Alexis Peters and Dave Flatman) were most helpful. Three successive Associate Deans of Research – Graham Pike, Kevin Hetherington and Gillian Rose – understood well the managerial challenges posed by large research projects and were fully supportive. The project would have been impossible without the dedication of colleagues and partners making up the consortium. Our Advisory Board members – Didier Bigo, Joe Painter and Gerard Delanty – were most helpful with their critical interventions. We are grateful to (and enjoyed working with) the consortium researchers: Rutvica Andrijasevic, Claudia Aradau, Zsuzsanna Arendas, Anaïs Faure Atger, Jennifer Bagelman, Sandra Baltruka, Ayşe Çağlar, Sergio Carrera, Elspeth Guild, Jef Huysmans, Ivars Indāns, Bora Isyar, Fuat Keyman, Kristīne Krūma, P. G. Macioti, Sandra Mantu, Sebastian Mehling, Prem Kumar Rajaram, Bahar Rumelili and Vicki Squire. Coordination of the project and its researchers was superbly handled by Anne Paynter, whose nickname, ‘Super Anne’, was entirely merited. We owe Anne a debt of gratitude for her tireless work, always done with good humour. Jack Harrington contributed enormously to the assembling and editing of this book. His excellent copy-editing and management skills went a long way towards helping us to achieve a measure of clear and consistent expression. Finally, we would like to thank our partners, Evelyn Ruppert and Sarah Driver, whose support was more deeply valued than our words can express here.

Engin F. Isin

Michael Saward




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