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The Cambridge Companion to Life and Death

£20.99

Part of Cambridge Companions to Philosophy

Steven Luper, Mark A. Bedau, Eric T. Olson, Katherine Hawley, Marya Schechtman, David DeGrazia, Noah Lemos, Eyjólfur K. Emilsson, John Martin Fischer, Jens Johansson, James Warren, Simon Keller, Nicholas Agar, David Archard, Michael Tooley, Thomas Hill, Jr, Kadri Vihvelin, Matthew Hanser, Krister Bykvist
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  • Date Published: February 2014
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107606760

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About the Authors
  • This volume meets the increasing interest in a range of philosophical issues connected with the nature and significance of life and death, and the ethics of killing. What is it to be alive and to die? What is it to be a person? What must time be like if we are to persist? What makes one life better than another? May death or posthumous events harm the dead? The chapters in this volume address these questions, and also discuss topical issues such as abortion, euthanasia, and suicide. They explore the interrelation between the metaphysics, significance, and ethics of life and death, and they discuss the moral significance of killing both people and animals, and the extent to which death harms them. The volume is for all those studying the philosophy of life and death, for readers taking applied ethics courses, and for those studying ethics and metaphysics more generally.

    • Covers a full range of issues concerning the philosophy of life and death
    • Addresses key topical issues such as abortion, euthanasia, and suicide
    • Explores the interrelation between metaphysics, significance, and the ethics of life and death
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'This collection highlights many interesting issues related, more or less fundamentally, to the issues of life and death, from contextual definitions of terms, to meaning, and to ethics. It will be quite understandable even to those without academic backgrounds in these ideas.' Metapsychology Online Reviews

    '… written with students in mind, and those looking for an up-to-date and accessible account of scholarship in a particular area. The 19 contributors here are all philosophers who write well and clearly about life and death from various perspectives … if one of the functions of philosophy, whether secular or not, is to help us to think more clearly, then this is what this Companion achieves admirably.' Robin Gill, Church Times

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2014
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107606760
    • length: 368 pages
    • dimensions: 226 x 152 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.52kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Steven Luper
    Part I. The Metaphysics of Life and Death:
    1. The nature of life Mark A. Bedau
    2. The nature of people Eric T. Olson
    3. Persistence and time Katherine Hawley
    4. The malleability of identity Marya Schechtman
    5. The nature of human death David DeGrazia
    Part II. The Significance of Life and Death:
    6. Assessing lives Noah Lemos
    7. On the length of a good life Eyjólfur K. Emilsson
    8. Mortal harm John Martin Fischer
    9. When do we incur mortal harm? Jens Johansson
    10. The symmetry problem James Warren
    11. Posthumous harm Simon Keller
    12. Life's meaning Steven Luper
    Part III. The Ethics of Life and Death:
    13. Enhancing humanity Nicholas Agar
    14. Procreating David Archard
    15. Abortion Michael Tooley
    16. Killing ourselves Thomas Hill, Jr
    17. Killing in self-defense Kadri Vihvelin
    18. Imperfect aiding Matthew Hanser
    19. Killing and extinction Krister Bykvist.

  • Editor

    Steven Luper, Trinity University, Texas
    Steven Luper is Chair of the Philosophy Department at Trinity University, Texas. He is author of several books, including A Guide to Ethics (2001) and The Philosophy of Death (Cambridge, 2009), and editor of, most recently, The Skeptics: Contemporary Essays (2003) and Essential Knowledge (2004).

    Contributors

    Steven Luper, Mark A. Bedau, Eric T. Olson, Katherine Hawley, Marya Schechtman, David DeGrazia, Noah Lemos, Eyjólfur K. Emilsson, John Martin Fischer, Jens Johansson, James Warren, Simon Keller, Nicholas Agar, David Archard, Michael Tooley, Thomas Hill, Jr, Kadri Vihvelin, Matthew Hanser, Krister Bykvist

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