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The Cambridge World History of Slavery

Volume 4. AD 1804–AD 2016

£120.00

Part of The Cambridge World History of Slavery

David Eltis, Stanley L. Engerman, Seymour Drescher, David Richardson, Barry W. Higman, David Northrup, Pieter C. Emmer, Laird Bergad, João Reis, Gareth Austen, Michael Ferguson, Ehud Toledano, Gwyn Campbell, Alessandro Stanziani, Robert L. Paquette, Alex Borucki, Jessica Millward, David Geggus, Rudolph T. Ware, III, James Brewer Stewart, Shane O'Rourke, Indrani Chatterjee, Christopher Schmidt-Nowara, Celso Thomas Castilho, Peter A. Coclanis, Pamela Crossley, Pamela Scully, Kerry Ward, Richard Roberts, Rosemarijn Hoefte, Alan Barenberg, Kevin Bales
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  • Date Published: April 2017
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521840699

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About the Authors
  • Slavery and coerced labor have been among the most ubiquitous of human institutions both in time - from ancient times to the present - and in place, having existed in virtually all geographic areas and societies. This volume covers the period from the independence of Haiti to modern perceptions of slavery by assembling twenty-eight original essays, each written by scholars acknowledged as leaders in their respective fields. Issues discussed include the sources of slaves, the slave trade, the social and economic functioning of slave societies, the responses of slaves to enslavement, efforts to abolish slavery continuing to the present day, the flow of contract labor and other forms of labor control in the aftermath of abolition, and the various forms of coerced labor that emerged in the twentieth century under totalitarian regimes and colonialism.

    • Chapters include coverage of all parts of the world, providing a comparative presentation of slavery and related institutions
    • Contributions from leading authorities in their respective fields give authoritative reviews of major issues
    • The variety of ideological perspectives represented in the volume offer widely different worldviews and personal perspectives
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'This excellent collection treats slavery as the truly global phenomenon that it was, and still is, and it looks at slavery within a broad range of forms of labor coercion. The editors have pulled together a team of outstanding authors, most of whom are established authorities on the subjects they discuss.' Martin Klein, University of Toronto

    'With revisionary interpretations, this distinguished team of historians has produced an original, compelling and persuasive argument for the centrality of slavery in the shaping of modern history.' James Walvin, University of York

    'This book is a thought-provoking intervention into the history and practices of slavery and other forms of coerced labor since the nineteenth century to the present, covering all parts of the world as well as major topics. It surely will spark a series of significant interdisciplinary debates, while future scholarship will rest on this thoughtful and expansive tome.' Toyin Falola, Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South, the Library of Congress

    'This volume is brilliantly constructed with contributions from all parts of the world. It draws together the finest work on the history of forced labor between the Haitian Revolution and abolition. It is authoritatively researched, brilliantly presented, and clearly written - a welcome addition in every library.' Ira Berlin, University of Maryland

    'This is a must-read for those interested in a comprehensive survey of nineteenth-century global slavery, its rise, decline, and aftermath. Not just an investigation of 'Second Slavery' in Africa, Asia and the Americas, this formidable volume examines a stunning range of coerced labor systems from a variety of rich perspectives, varying from the demographic to the cultural.' Philip Morgan, The Johns Hopkins University

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2017
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521840699
    • length: 718 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 160 x 45 mm
    • weight: 1.14kg
    • contains: 9 b/w illus. 3 maps 16 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Overview:
    1. Introduction David Eltis, Stanley L. Engerman, Seymour Drescher and David Richardson
    2. Demographic trends among coerced populations Barry W. Higman
    3. Overseas movements of slaves and indentured workers David Northrup
    Part II. Slavery:
    4. Slavery in the non-Hispanic West Indies to 1863 Pieter C. Emmer and Stanley L. Engerman
    5. Slavery in Cuba and Puerto Rico, 1804 to abolition Laird Bergad
    6. Slavery in nineteenth-century Brazil João Reis
    7. US slavery and its aftermath, 1804–2000 Stanley L. Engerman
    8. Slavery in Africa, 1804–1936 Gareth Austen
    9. Ottoman slavery and abolition in the nineteenth century Michael Ferguson and Ehud Toledano
    10. Slavery and bondage in the Indian Ocean world, nineteenth and twentieth centuries Gwyn Campbell and Alessandro Stanziani
    11. Slavery in India Alessandro Stanziani
    12. Slave resistance Robert L. Paquette
    13. Black culture in the nineteenth century Alex Borucki and Jessica Millward
    Part III. Abolition:
    14. Slavery and the Haitian revolution David Geggus
    15. Slavery and abolition in Islamic Africa, 1776–1905 Rudolph T. Ware, III
    16. European antislavery: from empires of slavery to global prohibition Seymour Drescher
    17. Antislavery and abolitionism in the United States, 1776–1870 James Brewer Stewart
    18. The emancipation of the serfs in Europe Shane O'Rourke
    19. British abolitionism from the vantage of pre-colonial South Asian regimes Indrani Chatterjee
    20. The transition from slavery to freedom in the Americas after 1804 Christopher Schmidt-Nowara
    21. Abolition and its aftermath in Brazil Celso Thomas Castilho
    Part IV. Aftermath:
    22. The American Civil War and its aftermath Peter A. Coclanis
    23. Dependency and coercion in East Asian labor, 1800–1949 Pamela Crossley
    24. Gender and coerced labor Pamela Scully and Kerry Ward
    25. Coerced labor in twentieth-century Africa Richard Roberts
    26. Indenture in the long nineteenth century Rosemarijn Hoefte
    27. Forced labor in Nazi Germany and the Stalinist USSR Alan Barenberg
    28. Contemporary coercive labor practices - slavery today Kevin Bales.

  • Editors

    David Eltis, Emory University, Atlanta
    David Eltis is an Emeritus Professor of History at Emory University, Atlanta and a Research Associate at the Hutchins Center, Harvard University, Massachusetts and at the University of British Columbia. His publications include Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade (with David Richardson, 2010), The Rise of African Slavery in the Americas (1999), and Economic Growth and the Ending of the Transatlantic Slave Trade (1989).

    Stanley L. Engerman, University of Rochester, New York
    Stanley L. Engerman is Professor Emeritus at the University of Rochester, New York and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, Massachusetts. Among his books are Time on the Cross: The Economics of American Negro Slavery (with Robert William Fogel, 1974), Slavery, Emancipation, and Freedom: Comparative Perspectives (2007), and Economic Development in the Americas since 1500: Endowments and Institutions (with Kenneth L. Sokoloff, Cambridge, 2011).

    Seymour Drescher, University of Pittsburgh
    Seymour Drescher is Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of History and Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh. His numerous publications include From Slavery to Freedom: Comparative Studies in the Rise and Fall of Atlantic Slavery (1999), The Mighty Experiment: Free Labor vs Slavery in British Emancipation (2002), and Abolition: A History of Slavery and Antislavery (Cambridge, 2009).

    David Richardson, University of Hull
    David Richardson is a Professor of Economic History at the University of Hull, and the former Director of the Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation, Hull. He is author of the Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade (with David Eltis, 2010), and editor of Routes to Slavery: Direction, Ethnicity and Mortality in the Transatlantic Slave Trade (with David Eltis, 1997), Extending the Frontiers: Essays on the New Transatlantic Slave Trade Database (with David Eltis, 2008), and Networks of Transcultural Exchange: Slave Trading in the South Atlantic, 1590-1867 (with Filipa Ribeiro da Silva, 2014).

    Contributors

    David Eltis, Stanley L. Engerman, Seymour Drescher, David Richardson, Barry W. Higman, David Northrup, Pieter C. Emmer, Laird Bergad, João Reis, Gareth Austen, Michael Ferguson, Ehud Toledano, Gwyn Campbell, Alessandro Stanziani, Robert L. Paquette, Alex Borucki, Jessica Millward, David Geggus, Rudolph T. Ware, III, James Brewer Stewart, Shane O'Rourke, Indrani Chatterjee, Christopher Schmidt-Nowara, Celso Thomas Castilho, Peter A. Coclanis, Pamela Crossley, Pamela Scully, Kerry Ward, Richard Roberts, Rosemarijn Hoefte, Alan Barenberg, Kevin Bales

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