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Building Bones
Bone Formation and Development in Anthropology

$60.00 USD

Part of Cambridge Studies in Biological and Evolutionary Anthropology

Christopher J. Percival, Joan T. Richtsmeier, Kenneth Weiss, Kazuhiko Kawasaki, Yuan Huang, Ethylin Wang Jabs, Runze Li, Valerie B. DeLeon, Alfred L. Rosenberger, Timothy D. Smith, Sarah E. Freidline, Cayetana Martinez-Maza, Philipp Gunz, Jean-Jacques Hublin, Paul C. Dechow, David B. Burr, Jason M. Organ, Terence D. Capellini, Heather Dingwall, Kelsey M. Kjosness, Philip L. Reno, Ian J. Wallace, Brigitte Demes, Stefan Judex, Russell T. Hogg, Timothy G. Bromage, Haviva M. Goldman, Julia A. Katris, John G. Clement, Timothy M. Ryan, David A. Raichlen, James H. Gosman
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  • Date Published: February 2017
  • availability: This item is not supplied by Cambridge University Press in your region. Please contact eBooks.com for availability.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108216029

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About the Authors
  • Bone is the tissue most frequently recovered archaeologically and is the material most commonly studied by biological anthropologists, who are interested in how skeletons change shape during growth and across evolutionary time. This volume brings together a range of contemporary studies of bone growth and development to highlight how cross-disciplinary research and new methods can enhance our anthropological understanding of skeletal variation. The novel use of imaging techniques from developmental biology, advanced sequencing methods from genetics, and perspectives from evolutionary developmental biology improve our ability to understand the bases of modern human and primate variation. Animal models can also be used to provide a broad biological perspective to the systematic study of humans. This volume is a testament to the drive of anthropologists to understand biological and evolutionary processes that underlie changes in bone morphology and illustrates the continued value of incorporating multiple perspectives within anthropological inquiry.

    • Provides a contemporary context to enable researchers to understand the relevance of development to more traditional research questions
    • Uses real-life research examples to illustrate how methods and knowledge from the fields of developmental biology, genetics, histology, morphometrics, and imaging can provide new insights
    • Provides a 'how-to' guide to the latest techniques used in the study of bone growth and development
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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2017
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108216029
    • contains: 48 b/w illus. 20 tables
    • availability: This item is not supplied by Cambridge University Press in your region. Please contact eBooks.com for availability.
  • Table of Contents

    List of contributors
    Introduction Christopher J. Percival and Joan T. Richtsmeier
    1. What is a biological 'trait'? Kenneth Weiss
    2. The contribution of angiogenesis to variation in bone development and evolution Christopher J. Percival, Kazuhiko Kawasaki, Yuan Huang, Kenneth Weiss, Ethylin Wang Jabs, Runze Li and Joan T. Richtsmeier
    3. Association of the chondrocranium and dermatocranium in early skull formation Kazuhiko Kawasaki and Joan T. Richtsmeier
    4. Unique ontogenetic patterns of postorbital septation in tarsiers and the issue of trait homology Valerie B. DeLeon, Alfred L. Rosenberger and Timothy D. Smith
    5. Exploring modern human facial growth at the micro and macroscopic levels Sarah E. Freidline, Cayetana Martinez-Maza, Philipp Gunz and Jean-Jacques Hublin
    6. Changes in mandibular cortical bone density and elastic properties during growth Paul C. Dechow
    7. Postcranial skeletal development and its evolutionary implications David B. Burr and Jason M. Organ
    8. Combining genetic and developmental methods to study musculoskeletal evolution in primates Terence D. Capellini and Heather Dingwall
    9. Using comparisons between species and anatomical locations to discover mechanisms of growth plate patterning and differential growth Kelsey M. Kjosness and Philip L. Reno
    10. Ontogenetic and genetic influences on bone's responsiveness to mechanical signals Ian J. Wallace, Brigitte Demes and Stefan Judex
    11. The Havers-Halberg oscillation and bone metabolism Russell T. Hogg, Timothy G. Bromage, Haviva M. Goldman, Julia A. Katris and John G. Clement
    12. Structural and mechanical changes in trabecular bone during early development in the human femur and humerus Timothy M. Ryan, David A. Raichlen and James H. Gosman
    Appendix to Chapter 3. Detailed anatomical description of developing chondrocranium and dermatocranium in the mouse Kazuhiko Kawasaki and Joan T. Richtsmeier
    Index.

  • Editors

    Christopher J. Percival, University of Calgary
    Christopher J. Percival is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Calgary. His research focuses on the basis for variation in skull form, in particular focusing on quantifying the role that interactions between tissues play in defining craniofacial morphology.

    Joan T. Richtsmeier, Pennsylvania State University
    Joan T. Richtsmeier is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at Pennsylvania State University. Her research seeks to understand the complex genetic and developmental basis of variation in head shape in development, disease and evolution.

    Contributors

    Christopher J. Percival, Joan T. Richtsmeier, Kenneth Weiss, Kazuhiko Kawasaki, Yuan Huang, Ethylin Wang Jabs, Runze Li, Valerie B. DeLeon, Alfred L. Rosenberger, Timothy D. Smith, Sarah E. Freidline, Cayetana Martinez-Maza, Philipp Gunz, Jean-Jacques Hublin, Paul C. Dechow, David B. Burr, Jason M. Organ, Terence D. Capellini, Heather Dingwall, Kelsey M. Kjosness, Philip L. Reno, Ian J. Wallace, Brigitte Demes, Stefan Judex, Russell T. Hogg, Timothy G. Bromage, Haviva M. Goldman, Julia A. Katris, John G. Clement, Timothy M. Ryan, David A. Raichlen, James H. Gosman

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