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Organising Music
Theory, Practice, Performance

£27.99

Nic Beech, Stephen Broad, Ann Cunliffe, Celia Duffy, Charlotte Gilmore, Antonio Strati, David Sims, Cliff Oswick, Robyn Thomas, Christine Coupland, Chris Bilton, Steve Cummings, Katy J. Mason, Mike Saren, Chris Hackley, Alan McCusker Thompson, Alan Bradshaw, Robert MacIntosh, Donald MacLean, Paul Hibbert, Casper Hoedemaekers, Sierk Ybema, Simon Rose, Raymond MacDonald, Davide Nicolini, Gail Greig, Nod Knowles, Louise Mitchell, Dimi Stoyanova Russell, Johnny Lynch, Gretchen Larsen, Martin Cloonan, Marco Panagopoulos, Shiona Chillas, Lloyd Meredith, Simon Webb, Martin Dowling, Richard Wigley, Elizabeth Gulledge, Jane Donald, Michael Downes, John Hunt, Carlo Zanotti, Matthew Young, Lori Watson, Chris Stout, R. M. Hubbert, Jenny Reeve, Jill O'Sullivan, Chris Cusak, Martin Henry, Daragh O'Reilly, Ben Talbot Dunn, Kevina Cody, Duglas T. Stewart, Peter Keenan, Jim Prime, Lance Green, Katy MacKintosh, Ian Smith
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  • Date Published: April 2017
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107421677

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About the Authors
  • Organisational theorists have become increasingly interested in the creative industries, where practices that are commonplace are of particular interest to organisations in other sectors as they look for new ways to enhance performance. Focusing on the music industry, this book sets up a unique dialogue between leading organisational theorists and music professionals. Part I explores links between organisation theory and the creative industries literature, concentrating on practices of organising and knowledge mobilisation, followed by an in-depth discussion of key theoretical concepts by subject experts. Part II provides a diverse range of 'tales from the field', including examples from classical orchestras, folk, indie and punk. The concluding chapter examines the shared dialogue to reveal what practice in the musical field can learn from organisational theory, and vice versa. This innovative book will interest graduate students and researchers in the fields of organisation studies, music management and the creative industries.

    • Applies organisation theory to the creative and performance aspects of music
    • Sets up a dialogue between leading organisation theorists and practising musicians, allowing the two communities to gain unique insights from each other
    • Will interest graduate students and researchers alike - the book has a sound research base that highlights promising new organising practices, and draws on a diverse range of case studies and personal experience
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'We have had the linguistic, reflexive, postmodern and practice turns, and we are now experiencing more of an exciting turn to explore what the language, organisation and practices of the arts can contribute to our understanding of organisational performance. This excellent book is a major contribution to this field, providing both a succinct and accessible contribution to the field of organisational studies, and case studies and reflections on what the field might learn from music and the music industry. I can thoroughly recommend it.' Richard J. Badham, Macquarie Graduate School of Management, Sydney

    'Articulate and wonderfully knowledgeable, this book stimulates fresh thinking about music making and organization theory. Bringing together two fields apparently disconnected, it offers valuable insights to be drawn from essays written by contributors from a wide range of professional and academic specializations.' Silvia Gherardi, Università di Trento

    'This book is a must for all of us who are interested in organizations and music, but it also provides more general fundamental insights into the organizing structures, processes and performances in our lives and society at large. Great composition, orchestra and virtuosity.' Eero Vaara, Hanken School of Economics, Finland

    'How the music industry plays to work has always fascinated management theorists. In this book, the free and easy open play of the music industry collides with organisational theory - to mutual benefit.' John Wallace, CBE, Former Principal of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2017
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107421677
    • length: 444 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 153 x 24 mm
    • weight: 0.65kg
    • contains: 2 b/w illus. 2 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction Nic Beech, Stephen Broad, Ann Cunliffe, Celia Duffy and Charlotte Gilmore
    Part I. Orienting Ideas: Organisation and Organising:
    2. Music and the aesthetic study of organisational life Antonio Strati
    3. Organising and storytelling David Sims
    4. Organising, music and metaphor: of connections, comparisons and correspondences Cliff Oswick
    5. Resisting change and changing resistance Robyn Thomas
    6. Identity work: organising the self, organising music Christine Coupland
    7. Creative strategy Chris Bilton and Steve Cummings
    Markets and engagement between production and consumption:
    8. Music and the making of markets Katy J. Mason
    9. Consumers and marketing Mike Saren
    10. Branding and the music market Chris Hackley
    11. Being in the room Alan McCusker Thompson
    12. Music and marketing Alan Bradshaw
    Organising in complex environments:
    13. Complexity theory Robert MacIntosh and Donald MacLean
    14. On leading in networks: the role of reflexive practices Paul Hibbert
    15. All of me: art, industry and identity struggles Casper Hoedemaekers and Sierk Ybema
    16. The process of improvisation Simon Rose and Raymond MacDonald
    17. Managing artistic work in the real world Davide Nicolini and Gail Greig
    Part II. Tales of Experience: Organising and Performing:
    18. Organising playing: reflections on the festival business Nod Knowles
    Organising music festivals Louise Mitchell and Dimi Stoyanova Russell
    Organising and playing a boutique festival Johnny Lynch and Gretchen Larsen
    Managing the Zoeys: some reminiscences Martin Cloonan
    Managing a punk band Marco Panagopoulos and Shiona Chillas
    Blogging, running a label and band management Lloyd Meredith and Shiona Chillas
    The organising and artistic demands of orchestral performances Simon Webb and Martin Dowling
    Leadership in the BBC Philharmonic Richard Wigley and Elizabeth Gulledge
    Orchestrating a flashmob: reach and reputation Jane Donald and Gail Grieg
    Developing a university's musical culture: a partnership approach Michael Downes
    Organising the National Pop League events John Hunt, Carlo Zanotti and Charlotte Gilmore
    Starting record label: Song by Toad Matthew Young and Dimi Stoyanova Russell
    19. Playing and organising: traditional music and the network Lori Watson and Charlotte Gilmore
    Multiple simultaneous projects in traditional and electronica and orchestral music Chris Stout and Charlotte Gilmore
    Storytelling and performance R. M. Hubbert and Elizabeth Gulledge
    Creating and making an album Jenny Reeve and Charlotte Gilmore
    Relationships between music, management, agents and labels Jill O'Sullivan and Shiona Chillas
    Dead or American: reasons to be fearless Chris Cusak
    Experiencing a creative journey Martin Henry and Daragh O'Reilly
    Musical identity: solo artist and band projects Ben Talbot Dunn and Kevina Cody
    An embodiment of a band Duglas T. Stewart, Charlotte Gilmore and Peter Keenan
    Rock music on the big stage Jim Prime and Peter Keenan
    Playing in the Royal Scottish National Orchestra Lance Green, Katy MacKintosh and Charlotte Gilmore
    Reflections of a gigging musician Ian Smith and Charlotte Gilmore
    20. Next steps in the dialogue: insights for practising and theorising Charlotte Gilmore and Nic Beech
    Index.

  • Resources for

    Organising Music

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  • Editors

    Nic Beech, University of Dundee
    Nic Beech is Vice-Principal and Head of the College of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Dundee and Chair of the British Academy of Management. His research interests are in management practice, change and the construction of identity in the music industry, health, financial services and creative industries. He has extensively published in the field of organisation studies and is the author of Managing Change (Cambridge, 2012) and Managing Creativity (Cambridge, 2009).

    Charlotte Gilmore, University of Edinburgh
    Charlotte Gilmore is a Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Edinburgh Business School. Before taking up her position at Edinburgh, she was a Lecturer in Creative and Cultural Industries at the University of St Andrews. Her area of interest is the creative industries and her work has been published in Human Relations, Management Learning and the British Journal of Management.

    Contributors

    Nic Beech, Stephen Broad, Ann Cunliffe, Celia Duffy, Charlotte Gilmore, Antonio Strati, David Sims, Cliff Oswick, Robyn Thomas, Christine Coupland, Chris Bilton, Steve Cummings, Katy J. Mason, Mike Saren, Chris Hackley, Alan McCusker Thompson, Alan Bradshaw, Robert MacIntosh, Donald MacLean, Paul Hibbert, Casper Hoedemaekers, Sierk Ybema, Simon Rose, Raymond MacDonald, Davide Nicolini, Gail Greig, Nod Knowles, Louise Mitchell, Dimi Stoyanova Russell, Johnny Lynch, Gretchen Larsen, Martin Cloonan, Marco Panagopoulos, Shiona Chillas, Lloyd Meredith, Simon Webb, Martin Dowling, Richard Wigley, Elizabeth Gulledge, Jane Donald, Michael Downes, John Hunt, Carlo Zanotti, Matthew Young, Lori Watson, Chris Stout, R. M. Hubbert, Jenny Reeve, Jill O'Sullivan, Chris Cusak, Martin Henry, Daragh O'Reilly, Ben Talbot Dunn, Kevina Cody, Duglas T. Stewart, Peter Keenan, Jim Prime, Lance Green, Katy MacKintosh, Ian Smith

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