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fifteeneightyfour

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Academic Perspectives from Cambridge University Press.

April 27th 2017 0

Celebrating National Poetry Month: 200 years since ‘Poems’ by John Keats

Let’s imagine, having read four sonnets published in the radical weekly, The Examiner, by young poet John Keats, seeing the announcement of John Keats’s first volume Poems (published 3 March 1817), and then, on the very next day, reeling when …

April 25th 2017 0

Celebrating National Poetry Month: ‘Now comes the shadow-dark dragon flying’ – Eddic Poetry and the Power of Legend

Vǫluspá (The Seeress’s Prophecy) cycles through the memories and prognostications of an unnamed female prophetess who has witnessed the whole history of a legendary world, and culminates in a baleful account of ragna rök  &ndas…

April 21st 2017 0

#EarthDay2017 Are We Prepared for Overpopulation?

Population Growth and our Environmental Future: The Optimistic View Prediction is difficult, especially about the future*   Next year (2018) marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Population Bomb, by Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich.&nbs…

April 21st 2017 0

The Myth of Violent Past

We tend to see our predecessors as violent brutes. From the ancient Roman torture of slaves, to the burning of heretics at the stake in Medieval Europe, to the Aztec sacrificial extractions of beating human hearts, we envisage our past as being excessivel…

April 20th 2017 0

Celebrating National Poetry Month: The Cambridge Companion to Postcolonial Poetry

The recent death of Derek Walcott, the most famous postcolonial poet, has been an enormous loss to poetry lovers around the world. The elegiac ending to his long poem Omeros came to mind: “I sang of quiet Achille, Afolabe’s son,” he says…

April 18th 2017 0

Computational Social Choice at a Glance

Over the last two decades, the computational social choice research community has grown from a handful of enthusiasts to hundreds of researchers, who have painted a beautiful picture of the interaction between collective decision making and computer scien…

April 18th 2017 0

Celebrating National Poetry Month: Yeats and Modern Poetry

I wrote Yeats and Modern Poetry because I think that W.B. Yeats (1865-1939) did more than any other poet to create something we recognise as ‘modern poetry’. Without Yeats, there might not be a ‘poetry month’ today. For me, T.S. El…

April 17th 2017 0

Freud & Thinking the ‘Future’ Part 1

I recently contributed a short entry for Fueling Culture: 101 Words for Energy and Environment (2017) called “Future.”  In it I outline the task of thinking the future in light of the crisis of capitalism and the catastrophe that is globa…

April 17th 2017 0

The Consolidation Debate

The hippocampus binds information between different cortical regions during long-term memory. However, long-term memories may only depend on the hippocampus for a limited time. In the standard model of memory consolidation, a long-term memory representati…

April 14th 2017 0

How Government Insiders Subvert the Public Interest

Too little attention has been paid to the supply side of political markets populated by rulers, elected officials, bureaucrats, and public employees and the extent to which such government insiders can profit at the expense of the public interest. Existin…

Cambridge Extra at the Linguist List

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An online resource for linguists worldwide.

April 13th 2017 0

Albert Valdman Award Winners 2017

Blog post from Akira Murakami and Theodora Alexopoulou: We wish to express our sincere gratitude to Studies in Second Language Acquisition and Cambridge University Press for selecting our paper, ‘L1 influence on the acquisition order of English gram…

April 11th 2017 0

JLG Call for Co-Editor

Journal of Linguistic Geography (JLG) is an online-only refereed journal of international scope publishing the highest quality scholarship on dialect geography and the spatial distribution of language relative to questions of variation and change. The jou…

March 28th 2017 0

“Analysing English Sentences” – A. Radford

By Susan E. Holt My love affair (and it really is love) with linguistics began back as a nine year old watching “My Fair Lady” for the first time.  After the initial romance, it was time to make a serious commitment and that came in the f…

March 20th 2017 0

Enter the Gnome Chomsky Competition #findgnomeahome

It's competition time and we'd like to find Gnome Noam a Home. Enter the competition to be entered into the prize draw. Good Luck! . . . → Read More: Enter the Gnome Chomsky Competition #findgnomeahome

March 20th 2017 0

Tasks, methodological transparency and the IRIS database of research materials

Commentary by Emma Marsden, University of York and Margaret Borowczyk, Georgetown University IRIS is a repository of instruments used in second language research. It was created to increase access to the variety of materials used to elicit data for empiri…

March 17th 2017 0

The American Association for Applied Linguistics and the Annual Review of Applied Linguistics: New format/closer ties

Commentary by Kathleen M. Bailey, Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey and President, AAAL and Alison Mackey, Georgetown University and Lancaster University and editor of ARAL Every year for almost four decades, ARAL has ser…

March 7th 2017 0

The merits of a case study approach in communication disorders

Blog post by Louise Cummings, Nottingham Trent University . . . → Read More: The merits of a case study approach in communication disorders

February 3rd 2017 0

Cambridge Applied Linguistics Series

This series highlights key topics in Applied Linguistics. Each book presents original research, either up-dating and re-thinking a traditional theme, or introducing important new concepts. . . . → Read More: Cambridge Applied Linguistics Series

January 20th 2017 0

Trump’s Monolingual Disadvantage

Blog Post by Douglas Kibbee, author of Language and the Law: Linguistic Inequality in America Early in the fall of 2016 several news agencies speculated that Donald Trump might be suffering from early onset dementia.  Could this be related to his ada…

January 18th 2017 1

The Study of Language 6th edition by George Yule

This bestselling textbook provides an engaging and user-friendly introduction to the study of language. Assuming no prior knowledge of the subject, Yule presents information in bite-sized sections, clearly explaining the major concepts in linguistics thro…

Cambridge Medicine

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Keeping a finger on the pulse.

February 8th 2017 0

Knowledge gaps in the epidemiology of Toxocara: the enigma remains

The latest Parasitology Paper of the Month is “Knowledge gaps in the epidemiology of Toxocara: the enigma remains” by Celia Holland. Some parasites seem to have a Cinderella status. Down in the basement of the ugly stepmother’s house, th…

November 28th 2016 0

The challenges of big data in low- and middle-income countries: from paper to petabytes

Generation of digital data has expanded exponentially over the last decade, inspiring visions of data-driven healthcare and precision medicine. But the promise of big data is tempered by today’s reality in low resource settings: weak health systems …

November 18th 2016 0

Which behaviours and symptoms are the most distressing for family carers of people with dementia?

The November International Psychogeriatrics Article of the Month is entitled “A systematic review of the relationship between behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD) and caregiver well-being” by Alexandra Feast, Esme Moniz-Cook, Charlotte…

November 9th 2016 0

Insomnia more common in teens whose mums had postnatal depression

More than a third (36%) of teenagers whose mothers suffered from postnatal depression experienced sleep problems at the age of 18, compared to only one in five (22%) teenagers whose mothers didn’t suffer from postnatal depression. Insomnia affects b…

October 11th 2016 0

Towards an exposure-dependent model of post-traumatic stress

Imagine sitting at your desk at work, on a Friday afternoon, just waiting for the weekend to begin. Then; a loud bang, the walls are shaking, your office windows shatter. With ears ringing, you crawl out into the corridor. The guy in the office next to yo…

October 4th 2016 0

Danish Suicide Prevention Clinics prevent more than deaths by suicide

This post was written by Johannes Birkbak and Annette Erlangsen. A new Danish study finds that psychosocial therapy for suicide prevention does more than preventing deaths by suicide. The treatment also reduces risk of death by other causes. Mental a…

September 21st 2016 0

Get your sleep and treat depression to guard against Alzheimer’s disease

The September International Psychogeriatrics Article of the Month is entitled “Associations between depression, sleep disturbance, and apolipoprotein E in the development of Alzheimer’s disease: dementia” by Shanna L. Burke, Peter Marama…

September 13th 2016 0

Medicalisation of young minds: new study reveals 28% rise in antidepressant prescribing amongst 6-18 year olds « Swansea University

Antidepressant prescribing amongst children and young people has shown a significant increase of 28% in the past decade, even though recorded diagnoses of depression have gone down, according to new research published today. One in ten children and young …

September 7th 2016 0

A centenary of Robert T. Leiper’s lasting legacy on schistosomiasis and a COUNTDOWN on control of neglected tropical diseases

The latest Parasitology Paper of the Month is “A centenary of Robert T. Leiper’s lasting legacy on schistosomiasis and a COUNTDOWN on control of neglected tropical diseases” by J. Russell Stothard, Narcis B. Kabatereine, John Archer, Haj…

August 29th 2016 0

The road to depression: understanding the consequences of driving cessation in older women

The August International Psychogeriatrics Article of the Month is entitled “Moderating effects of social engagement on driving cessation in older women” by Nancy A. Pachana, Janni K Leung, Paul A Gardiner and Deirdre McLaughlin. This blog piec…

Cambridge Library Collection

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Books of enduring scholarly value.

March 20th 2015 0

Goodbyeee!

Alas, and thrice woe (from my point of view anyway), this is my last ever blog for the Cambridge Library Collection. I now slip away into the sunset, leaving others to ramble on (or, even better, write snappily and coherently) … Continue reading &r…

March 16th 2015 1

Spring and Port Wine

 … is the name of a play and then a film about Bolton, in northern England. However, I’m borrowing the title because I’ve just spent a few spring days in (O)Porto, where the wine comes from. My Portuguese vocabulary has … Co…

March 10th 2015 2

The Wit and Wisdom of the Rev. Sydney Smith

Sydney Smith is described in his ODNB entry as ‘author and wit’, which somewhat overlooks the day job as a clergyman. In the two-volume ‘life and letters’ published in 1855 by his daughter Saba (a name he invented himself), she &he…

March 5th 2015 0

A Child’s History of England

The paths of the Cambridge Library Collection and Charles Dickens have crossed several times – remarkable, given that Dickens is (of course) one of Britain’s greatest novelists, and we don’t publish much fiction. But of the short experim…

March 3rd 2015 5

The Huguenots

I have mentioned before the industrious Samuel Smiles, Victorian believer in hard work and self-education (otherwise known as pulling oneself up by one’s bootstraps) as the way to social improvement and financial prosperity. His 1867 work on the Hug…

February 27th 2015 3

The Diary of John Evelyn

One of my vital tools as a scribbler of blogs on books is a little pack of those things – I don’t even know what they are called – which you can stick on to a page to mark a … Continue reading →

February 23rd 2015 3

Illustrations of Roman London

Charles Roach Smith was born on the Isle of Wight in 1806, and reared by his mother and older sisters after his father’s death when he was six years old. He was educated in Hampshire, and then brought back to … Continue reading →

February 18th 2015 1

Tulipomania

It’s really too early in the year for a blog on this topic: galanthophilia is in full swing around the country. But we have just received the first copy of Sweet’s Hortus Britannicus, Or, a Catalogue of Plants, Indigenous, or … Continue…

February 16th 2015 0

The Roll Call

…or, to give it its full title, Calling the Roll after an Engagement, Crimea, a large military history painting exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1874, was so popular as an exhibit that a policeman, ‘poor, hot man’, had to … Cont…

February 12th 2015 0

Winter Journey

Last Saturday, in ‘CD Review’ on BBC Radio 3, they discussed and played extracts from various new recordings of Schubert song cycles, of which the least satisfactory (in my view) was a Winterreise by a counter-tenor. Not the strangeness of &he…

Journals Blog

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Advancing learning, knowledge and research.

April 28th 2017 0

Adding Ireland to the Analysis – Ireland’s impact on the ‘Decade of Reform’

Read Jay Roszman’s recent article, ‘Ireland as a Weapon of Warfare’: Whigs, Tories, and the problem of Irish outrages, 1835 to 1839‘ was published in The Historical Journal.…

April 27th 2017 0

Shopping in Rome from ancient to modern

Claire Holleran, University of Exeter, discusses her forthcoming article, ‘Finding commerce: the taberna and the identification of Roman commercial space’ in Papers of the British School at Rome (2017), which will shortly be publishe…

April 27th 2017 0

The Use of Economics in International Trade and Investment Disputes

We started to work on this book when the world still seemed to be okay for those looking at it through the lens of international economics or international economic law.…

April 26th 2017 0

Journal of Latin American Studies Special Virtual Issue: Peru

This virtual special issue, published to coincide with the conference of the Latin American Studies Association to be held in Lima on 29 April-1 May 2017, brings together articles published in the Journal of Latin American Studies on Peru in the last deca…

April 26th 2017 0

Consistent patterns of trophic niche specialization in host populations infected with a non-native copepod parasite

The latest Parasitology Paper of the Month is “Consistent patterns of trophic niche specialization in host populations infected with a non-native copepod parasite” by J.…

April 25th 2017 0

TEL Fifth Anniversary Lecture: A Celebration in REDD

Transnational Environmental Law (TEL) was launched in 2012. Its emphasis on the contribution of non-state actors and recognition of the multilevel governance context in which law and regulatory developments now occur was path breaking.…

April 25th 2017 0

Criminal Justice: The DNA Revolution and the Evolution of Innocence

For centuries, scholars, judges and lawyers speculated about the error rate in the criminal justice system, many of them searching for absolute proof of the innocent person wrongfully convicted and imprisoned.  These efforts often proved futile, abse…

April 20th 2017 0

Q&A on the use of Google Consumer Surveys for social science research, with Lie Philip Santoso, Robert Stein, and Randy Stevenson

There’s a great deal of discussion these days about survey and polling methodology.  A series of close and surprising elections, worldwide, have led many to wonder about the state of polling and survey methodology — Brexit, the Colombian …

April 19th 2017 0

Q&A with Kevin M. Kruse: Meet the Editorial Board for Modern American History

For the latest entry of our blog series introducing the board members of the new Cambridge University Press journal, Modern American History, Kevin M.…

April 19th 2017 0

Dartmouth Research Finds Strong Link Between Fast-food Ads and Fast-food Consumption Among Pre-school Children

Pre-school age children who are exposed to child-targeted fast-food advertising on television are considerably more likely to consume fast-food products, according to a recent Dartmouth-led study published in the journal Public Health Nutrition.&hell…

April 18th 2017 0

Climate change and risks to fossil fuel industry: sustainability train has left the station

Two seminal articles by energy experts in the latest issue of MRS Energy and Sustainability (MRS E&S) examine the climate-related risks facing the fossil fuel industry and conclude that the sustainability train has already well and truly left the stat…

April 18th 2017 0

The Troika gave Ireland more autonomy over social security cuts than is commonly recognised

The so called ‘Troika’ of the European Commission, European Central Bank, and the International Monetary Fund was frequently criticised during the Eurozone crisis on the basis that it had imposed austerity on countries requiring a bailout.&hel…

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