Skip to content
Cart
Register Sign in Wishlist

The Transformation of Islamic Law in Global Financial Markets

$129.00

  • Date Published: January 2015
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107061507

$ 129.00
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an evaluation copy?

This title is not currently available for evaluation. However, if you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an evaluation copy. To register your interest please contact asiamktg@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • The role of global capital in relation to human social systems has assumed enormous proportions in liberalised, deregulated markets. States attempt to nationalise it, financial centres spring up in its wake, and INGOs attempt to deal with its de-territorialising, supranational characteristics. A global adjudication system (arbitration) has been introduced to safeguard and buttress its flow. The power of Islamic capital has generated numerous sites of legal contestation and negotiation, ranging from gateway financial centres, international law firms and transnational financial institutions, all of which interact in the production of Islamic financial law (IFL). The process of producing IFL illustrates complex fields of action driven by power dynamics, neoliberal paradigms and the institutional momentum of the global economy. The municipal legal systems under study in this book (the United Kingdom, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates and the Dubai International Financial Centre) illustrate globalisation's acceleration of legal, economic and social production.

    • Case studies encourage readers to assess the different regulatory approaches to Islamic finance and the ways in which these differences contribute to the developing legal system
    • Provides readers with a comparative perspective of the way in which legal systems interact and are reproduced in global markets
    • Suggests that diversity in the global economy takes place within a dynamic power structure in which leading economies largely dictate the rules, standards and best practices of financial markets
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2015
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107061507
    • length: 424 pages
    • dimensions: 237 x 160 x 30 mm
    • weight: 0.75kg
    • contains: 1 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction
    2. The sharia: sources, legal theory and unofficial sources of law
    3. Islamic commercial doctrine and classical commercial transactions
    4. Global financial markets and legal transformation
    5. Vehicular legal systems: the legislative implementation of sharia principles
    6. The regulation of Islamic financial institutions in the United Kingdom
    7. The regulation of Islamic financial institutions in Bahrain
    8. The regulation of Islamic financial institutions in the United Arab Emirates
    9. The regulation of Islamic financial institutions in the Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC)
    10. The enforcement of non-national legal systems: the arbitration of Islamic financial disputes
    11. Conclusion.

  • Author

    Jonathan Ercanbrack, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
    Jonathan G. Ercanbrack is Lecturer in the Law of Islamic Finance and Assistant Director of the Centre for Islamic and Middle Eastern Law at SOAS, University of London.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×