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The Cambridge Companion to Hip-Hop

£22.99

Part of Cambridge Companions to Music

Justin A. Williams, Alice Price-Styles, Imani K. Johnson, Ivor Miller, Kjetil Falkenberg Hansen, Travis Gosa, Christina Zanfagna, Nicole Hodges Persley, Oliver Kautny, Kyle Adams, Chris Tabron, Anthony Kwame Harrison, Geoff Harkness, Regina Bradley, Chris Deis, Amanda Sewell, Adam Haupt, Noriko Manabe, Richard Bramwell, Sujatha Fernandes, Ali Coleen Neff, Mike D'Errico, Brenna Byrd, Loren Kajikawa, Michael Jeffries
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  • Date Published: February 2015
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107643864

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About the Authors
  • It has been more than thirty-five years since the first commercial recordings of hip-hop music were made. This Companion, written by renowned scholars and industry professionals reflects the passion and scholarly activity occurring in the new generation of hip-hop studies. It covers a diverse range of case studies from Nerdcore hip-hop to instrumental hip-hop to the role of rappers in the Obama campaign and from countries including Senegal, Japan, Germany, Cuba, and the UK. Chapters provide an overview of the 'four elements' of hip-hop - MCing, DJing, break dancing (or breakin'), and graffiti - in addition to key topics such as religion, theatre, film, gender, and politics. Intended for students, scholars, and the most serious of 'hip-hop heads', this collection incorporates methods in studying hip-hop flow, as well as the music analysis of hip-hop and methods from linguistics, political science, gender and film studies to provide exciting new perspectives on this rapidly developing field.

    • Provides a new resource for students and enthusiasts, which updates and adds to previous arguments, debates, and contexts in hip-hop studies
    • Takes a multidisciplinary approach to hip-hop studies, including perspectives from political science, linguistics, musicology, and ethnomusicology
    • Balances mainstream US case studies with those from countries around the world, revealing links between global and local trends in hip-hop
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    Reviews & endorsements

    '… The Cambridge Companion to Hip-Hop provides a powerful account of what it presents, persuasively, as the most revolutionary music since rock'n'roll.' Andrew Warnes, The Times Literary Supplement

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2015
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107643864
    • length: 370 pages
    • dimensions: 244 x 173 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.75kg
    • contains: 20 b/w illus. 11 music examples
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: the interdisciplinary world of hip-hop studies Justin A. Williams
    Part I. Elements:
    1. MC origins: rap and spoken word poetry Alice Price-Styles
    2. Hip-hop dance Imani K. Johnson
    3. Hip-hop visual arts Ivor Miller
    4. DJs and turntabilism Kjetil Falkenberg Hansen
    5. The fifth element: knowledge Travis Gosa
    6. Hip-hop and religion: from the mosque to the church Christina Zanfagna
    7. Hip-hop theater and performance Nicole Hodges Persley
    Part II. Methods and Concepts:
    8. Lyrics and flow in rap music Oliver Kautny
    9. The musical analysis of hip-hop Kyle Adams
    10. The glass: hip-hop production Chris Tabron
    11. Hip-hop and racial identification: an (auto)ethnographic perspective Anthony Kwame Harrison
    12. Thirty years of rapsploitation: hip-hop culture in American cinema Geoff Harkness
    13. Barbz and kings: explorations of gender and sexuality in hip-hop Regina Bradley
    14. Hip-hop and politics Chris Deis
    15. Intertextuality, sampling, and copyright Justin A. Williams
    Part III. Case Studies:
    16. Nerdcore hip-hop Amanda Sewell
    17. Framing gender, race, and hip-hop in Boyz in the Hood, Do the Right Thing and Slam Adam Haupt
    18. Japanese hip-hop: alternative stories Noriko Manabe
    19. Council estate of mind: the British rap tradition and London's hip-hop scene Richard Bramwell
    20. Cuban hip-hop Sujatha Fernandes
    21. Senegalese hip-hop Ali Coleen Neff
    22. Off the grid: instrumental hip-hop and experimentalism after the golden age Mike D'Errico
    23. Stylized Turkish German as the resistance vernacular of German hip-hop Brenna Byrd
    24. 'Bringin' '88 back': historicizing rap music's greatest year Loren Kajikawa
    25. 'Where ya at?': Hip-hop's political locations in the Obama era Michael Jeffries.

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    The Cambridge Companion to Hip-Hop

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  • Editor

    Justin A. Williams, University of Bristol
    Justin A. Williams is Lecturer in Music at the University of Bristol, and the author of Rhymin and Stealin: Musical Borrowing in Hip-hop (2013). He has taught at Leeds College of Music, Lancaster University and Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, and has been published in Popular Music, Popular Music History, and The Journal of Musicology. As a professional trumpet and piano player in California, he ran a successful jazz piano trio and played with the band Bucho! which won a number of Sacramento Area Music Awards and were signed to two record labels. He has co-written (with Ross Wilson) an article on digital crowd funding for The Oxford Handbook to Music and Virtuality and is co-editor, with Katherine Williams, of The Cambridge Companion to the Singer-Songwriter (2016).

    Contributors

    Justin A. Williams, Alice Price-Styles, Imani K. Johnson, Ivor Miller, Kjetil Falkenberg Hansen, Travis Gosa, Christina Zanfagna, Nicole Hodges Persley, Oliver Kautny, Kyle Adams, Chris Tabron, Anthony Kwame Harrison, Geoff Harkness, Regina Bradley, Chris Deis, Amanda Sewell, Adam Haupt, Noriko Manabe, Richard Bramwell, Sujatha Fernandes, Ali Coleen Neff, Mike D'Errico, Brenna Byrd, Loren Kajikawa, Michael Jeffries

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