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The Cambridge Companion to Recorded Music

£62.00

Part of Cambridge Companions to Music

Eric Clarke, Nicholas Cook, Daniel Leech-Wilkinson, John Rink, Susan Tomes, Peter Hill, Donald Greig, Mike Howlett, Steve Savage, Andrew Blake, Jonathan Freeman-Attwood, Michael Haas, Albin Zak, Martyn Ware, Richard Witts, Louise Meintjes, Tully Potter, Arild Bergh, Tia DeNora, Martin Elste, David Patmore, Lewis Foreman, George Brock-Nannestad, Roger Beardsley, Nigel Simeone, Simon Trezise, Ted Kendall, Nick Mason, Roger Heaton, Colin Lawson, Simon Frith, Chris Watson, Georgina Born
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  • Date Published: November 2009
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521865821

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About the Authors
  • From the cylinder to the download, the practice of music has been radically transformed by the development of recording and playback technologies. This Companion provides a detailed overview of the transformation, encompassing both classical and popular music. Topics covered include the history of recording technology and the businesses built on it; the impact of recording on performance styles; studio practices, viewed from the perspectives of performer, producer and engineer; and approaches to the study of recordings. The main chapters are interspersed by 'short takes' - short contributions by different practitioners, ranging from classical or pop producers and performers to record collectors. Combining basic information with a variety of perspectives on records and recordings, this book will appeal not only to students in a range of subjects from music to the media, but also to general readers interested in a fundamental yet insufficiently understood dimension of musical culture.

    • Contains a large number of 'personal takes' by practitioners and performers, which complement the main chapters and engage a wide variety of readers
    • The definitive resource on this popular topic for students and other readers in areas ranging from musicology to popular culture and the media
    • The contributors are internationally renowned experts acknowledged as leaders in their field
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    '… the contributors (some 35 of them, counting the editors) form a lively company of writers and have the agreeable art of expressing opinions without seeming opinionated.' Gramophone

    'Effortlessly embracing the worlds of popular and classical music, what results is something really rather dazzling in its scope and scale.' Classical Music

    'This collection of essays offers many useful insights for both musicologists studying Western art music and scholars working within popular music studies. The book covers a wide range of topics within the remit of an exploration of recorded music, an area of study that has seen some noteworthy publications in the last decade.' The Journal of Popular Music

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    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2009
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521865821
    • length: 380 pages
    • dimensions: 246 x 175 x 23 mm
    • weight: 0.8kg
    • contains: 25 b/w illus. 1 table
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Eric Clarke, Nicholas Cook, Daniel Leech-Wilkinson and John Rink
    Personal takes: learning to live with recording Susan Tomes
    A short take in praise of long takes Peter Hill
    1. Performing for (and against) the microphone Donald Greig
    Personal takes: producing a credible voice Mike Howlett
    'It could have happened': the evolution of music construction Steve Savage
    2. Recording practices and the role of the producer Andrew Blake
    Personal takes: still small voices Jonathan Freeman-Attwood
    Broadening horizons: 'performance' in the studio Michael Haas
    3. Getting sounds: the art of sound engineering Albin Zak
    Personal takes: limitations and creativity in recording and performance Martyn Ware
    Records and recordings in post-punk England, 1978–80 Richard Witts
    4. The politics of the recording studio Louise Meintjes
    Personal take: from Lanza to Lassus Tully Potter
    5. From wind-up to iPod: techno-cultures of listening Arild Bergh and Tia DeNora
    Personal take: a matter of circumstance: on experiencing recordings Martin Elste
    6. Selling sounds: recordings and the music business David Patmore
    Personal take: revisiting concert life in mid-century: the survival of acetate discs Lewis Foreman
    7. The development of recording technologies George Brock-Nannestad
    Personal takes: raiders of the lost archive Roger Beardsley
    The original cast recording of West Side Story Nigel Simeone
    8. The recorded document: interpretation and discography Simon Trezise
    Personal takes: one man's approach to remastering Ted Kendall
    Technology, the studio, music Nick Mason
    Reminder: a recording is not a performance Roger Heaton
    9. Methods for analysing recordings Nicholas Cook
    10. Recordings and histories of performance style Daniel Leech-Wilkinson
    Personal take: recreating history: a clarinettist's perspective Colin Lawson
    11. Going critical. Writing about recordings Simon Frith
    Personal take: something in the air Chris Watson
    12. Afterword: from reproduction to representation to remediation Georgina Born
    Global bibliography
    Global discography.

  • Editors

    Nicholas Cook, University of Cambridge
    Eric Clarke is Heather Professor of Music at the University of Oxford.

    Eric Clarke, University of Oxford
    Nicholas Cook is Professor of Music at Cambridge University.

    Daniel Leech-Wilkinson, King's College London
    Daniel Leech-Wilkinson is Professor of Music at King's College London.

    John Rink, University of Cambridge
    John Rink is Professor of Music at Royal Holloway, University of London.

    Contributors

    Eric Clarke, Nicholas Cook, Daniel Leech-Wilkinson, John Rink, Susan Tomes, Peter Hill, Donald Greig, Mike Howlett, Steve Savage, Andrew Blake, Jonathan Freeman-Attwood, Michael Haas, Albin Zak, Martyn Ware, Richard Witts, Louise Meintjes, Tully Potter, Arild Bergh, Tia DeNora, Martin Elste, David Patmore, Lewis Foreman, George Brock-Nannestad, Roger Beardsley, Nigel Simeone, Simon Trezise, Ted Kendall, Nick Mason, Roger Heaton, Colin Lawson, Simon Frith, Chris Watson, Georgina Born

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