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The Cambridge Handbook of the Global Work–Family Interface

Part of Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology

Kristen M. Shockley, Winny Shen, Ryan C. Johnson, Kimberly A. French, Peter P. Yu, Ariane Ollier-Malaterre, Annie Foucreault, Aline D. Masuda, Matthew M. Piszczek, Anne H. Gauthier, Alzbeta Bartova, Soner Dumani, Tammy D. Allen, Sowan Wong, Vivian Mui-Chi Lun, Joan García Román, Sarah Flood, Karen Korabik, Tricia van Rhijn, Paul E. Spector, Juan I. Sanchez, Alexandra M. Tumminia, Rachel Omansky, Sara Tement, Constanze Leineweber, Helena Falkenberg, Pedro I. Leiva, Hector Madrid, Satoris S. Howes, Zitha Mokomane, Jeremiah T. McMillan, Leila Karimi, Jiri Rada, Comila Shahani-Denning, Aarti Shyamsunder, Eunae Cho, YeEun Choi, E. Anne Bardoel, Jarrod Haar, Lillian T. Eby, Olivia Vande Griek, Cindy Maupin, Emily Gilreath, Valerie Martinez, Aaron Cohen, Nicole Dodd, Justin van der Merwe, Joseph G. Grzywacz, Neena Gopalan, Fiorella L. Carlos Chavez, Mihaela Dimitrova, Karen S. Lyness, Michael K. Judiesch, Hilal E. Erkovan, Angela K. Pratt, Kaitlin M. Kiburz, Sarah L. Wallace, Rebecca J. Thompson, Ellen Ernst Kossek, T. Alexandra Beauregard, Kelly A. Basile, Cynthia A. Thompson, Heather N. Odle-Dusseau, Leslie B. Hammer, Beth A. Livingston, Scott Behson, Erin Kramer Holmes, E. Jeffrey Hill, Nathan L. Robbins, Paula Brough, Mina Westman, Lyn Craig, Ruth Habgood, Xinxin Li, Remus Ilies, Lorey A. Wheeler, Bora Lee, Elizabeth Svoboda, Carrie A. Bulger, Mark E. Hoffman, Suzan Lewis, Andrew Biga
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  • Date Published: April 2018
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781108401265

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About the Authors
  • The Cambridge Handbook of the Global Work-Family Interface is a response to growing interest in understanding how people manage their work and family lives across the globe. Given global and regional differences in cultural values, economies, and policies and practices, research on work-family management is not always easily transportable to different contexts. Researchers have begun to acknowledge this, conducting research in various national settings, but the literature lacks a comprehensive source that aims to synthesize the state of knowledge, theoretical progression, and identification of the most compelling future research ideas within field. The Cambridge Handbook of the Global Work-Family Interface aims to fill this gap by providing a single source where readers can find not only information about the general state of global work-family research, but also comprehensive reviews of region-specific research. It will be of value to researchers, graduate students, and practitioners of applied and organizational psychology, management, and family studies.

    • Provides summaries of work-family research in nine regions across the globe
    • Presents a broad, international, cross-cultural approach to the work-family interface
    • Appeals to those with an interest in starting cross-cultural work-family research
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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2018
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781108401265
    • length: 786 pages
    • dimensions: 253 x 176 x 36 mm
    • weight: 1.62kg
    • contains: 21 b/w illus. 16 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Overview:
    1. Introduction
    2. A comprehensive review and synthesis of the cross-cultural work-family literature
    3. GLOBE's cultural dimensions: implications for global work-family research
    Part II. Assessing Cultural and Structural Differences:
    4. Schwartz cultural values: implications for global work-family research
    5. Relationships between social policy, economic characteristics, and the work-family interface
    6. The impact of leave policies on employment, fertility, gender equality, and health
    7. Review of methods used in global work and family research
    Part III. Methodological Considerations:
    8. Meta-analysis as a tool to synthesize global work-family research findings
    9. Conducting qualitative work-family research across cultures
    10. Leveraging archival data in global work-family research: the case of time use data
    11. Best practices in scale translation and establishing measurement equivalence
    12. Getting the global band together: best practices in organizing and managing international research teams
    13. A review of work-family research in Western and Southern Europe
    Part IV. Review of Research in Regions across the Globe:
    14. A review of work-family research in Central and Eastern Europe
    15. A review of work-family research in Nordic regions
    16. A review of work-family research in Latin America
    17. A review of work-family research in Africa
    18. A review of work-family research in the Middle East
    19. A review of work-family research in South East Asia
    20. A review of work-family research in Confucian Asia
    21. A review of work-family research in Australia and New Zealand
    22. A cultures within culture perspective on work and family among United States employees
    Part V. Cultures within Cultures:
    23. Cultures within cultures in Israel: Jewish and Arab cultures and the work-family interface
    24. Modernity meets tradition: managing the work-family interface in South Africa
    25. Work and family among immigrants
    26. Expatriation and the work-family interface
    27. The work-family interface and careers in the global workplace: insights from cross-national research
    Part VI. Organizational Perspectives:
    28. Managing work and family issues in a multinational firm: organizational case study
    29. Workplace flexibility: strategies to help organizations navigate global expansion
    30. Organizational culture in the context of national culture
    31. Family supportive supervision around the globe
    32. Gender, gender norms, and national culture: global work-family at multiple levels of analysis
    Part VII. Family Perspectives:
    33. Fatherhood, work, and family across the globe: a review and research agenda
    34. Crossover, culture, and dual-earner couples
    35. Cultural considerations in the division of labor
    36. Affective processes in the work-family interface: global considerations
    37. Implications of work-family connections for children's well-being across the globe
    38. Segmentation/integration of work and non/work domains: global considerations
    Part VIII. Individual Perspectives:
    39. The meanings of work-life balance: a cultural perspective
    40. A cross-national view of personal responsibility for work-life balance
    Part IX. Conclusion:
    41. Charting a path forward
    Index.

  • Editors

    Kristen M. Shockley, University of Georgia
    Kristen M. Shockley is Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Georgia. She is passionate about studying how employees can have a meaningful work and family life. Her research appears in several top journals and books.

    Winny Shen, University of Waterloo, Ontario
    Winny Shen is Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Waterloo, Ontario. Her research examines how workers from diverse backgrounds and organizations can lead healthy, happy, and productive lives. Her work has been published in leading journals.

    Ryan C. Johnson, Ohio University
    Ryan C. Johnson is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. His research explores the intersection of work and health, aiming to improve lives and build more effective organizations. His work has been published in leading journals and books.

    Contributors

    Kristen M. Shockley, Winny Shen, Ryan C. Johnson, Kimberly A. French, Peter P. Yu, Ariane Ollier-Malaterre, Annie Foucreault, Aline D. Masuda, Matthew M. Piszczek, Anne H. Gauthier, Alzbeta Bartova, Soner Dumani, Tammy D. Allen, Sowan Wong, Vivian Mui-Chi Lun, Joan García Román, Sarah Flood, Karen Korabik, Tricia van Rhijn, Paul E. Spector, Juan I. Sanchez, Alexandra M. Tumminia, Rachel Omansky, Sara Tement, Constanze Leineweber, Helena Falkenberg, Pedro I. Leiva, Hector Madrid, Satoris S. Howes, Zitha Mokomane, Jeremiah T. McMillan, Leila Karimi, Jiri Rada, Comila Shahani-Denning, Aarti Shyamsunder, Eunae Cho, YeEun Choi, E. Anne Bardoel, Jarrod Haar, Lillian T. Eby, Olivia Vande Griek, Cindy Maupin, Emily Gilreath, Valerie Martinez, Aaron Cohen, Nicole Dodd, Justin van der Merwe, Joseph G. Grzywacz, Neena Gopalan, Fiorella L. Carlos Chavez, Mihaela Dimitrova, Karen S. Lyness, Michael K. Judiesch, Hilal E. Erkovan, Angela K. Pratt, Kaitlin M. Kiburz, Sarah L. Wallace, Rebecca J. Thompson, Ellen Ernst Kossek, T. Alexandra Beauregard, Kelly A. Basile, Cynthia A. Thompson, Heather N. Odle-Dusseau, Leslie B. Hammer, Beth A. Livingston, Scott Behson, Erin Kramer Holmes, E. Jeffrey Hill, Nathan L. Robbins, Paula Brough, Mina Westman, Lyn Craig, Ruth Habgood, Xinxin Li, Remus Ilies, Lorey A. Wheeler, Bora Lee, Elizabeth Svoboda, Carrie A. Bulger, Mark E. Hoffman, Suzan Lewis, Andrew Biga

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