Cambridge Catalogue  
  • Your account
  • View basket
  • Help
Home > Catalogue > Inside the Black Box
Inside the Black Box
Google Book Search

Search this book


  • Page extent: 320 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.47 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 338/.06
  • Dewey version: 19
  • LC Classification: HC79.T4 R673 1982
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Technological innovations
    • Technology--Social aspects
    • Economic development

Library of Congress Record

Add to basket


 (ISBN-13: 9780521273671 | ISBN-10: 0521273676)

DOI: 10.2277/0521273676

  • There was also a Hardback of this title but it is no longer available | Adobe eBook
  • Published March 1983

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

 (Stock level updated: 17:01 GMT, 27 November 2015)


Economists have long treated technological phenomena as events transpiring inside a black box and, on the whole, have adhered rather strictly to a self-imposed ordinance not to inquire too seriously into what transpires inside that box. The purpose of Professor Rosenberg's work is to break open and examine the contents of the black box. In so doing, a number of important economic problems be powerfully illuminated. The author clearly shows how specific features of individual technologies have shaped a number of variables of great concern to economists: the rate of productivity improvement, the nature of learning processes underlying technological change itself, the speed of technology transfer, and the effectiveness of government policies that are intended to influence technologies in particular ways. The separate chapters of this book reflect a primary concern with some of the distinctive aspects of industrial technologies in the twentieth century, such as the increasing reliance upon science, but also the considerable subtlety and complexity of the dialectic between science and technology. Other concerns include the rapid growth in the development of costs associated with new technologies as well as the difficulty of predicting the eventual performance characteristics of newly emerging technologies.


Preface; Part I. View of Technical Progress: 1. The historiography of technical progress; 2. Marx as a student of technology; Part II. Some Significant Characteristics of Technologies: 3. Technological interdependence in the American economy; 4. The effects of energy supply characteristics on technology and economic growth; 5. On technological expectations; 6. Learning by using; 7. How exogenous is science?; Part III. Market Determinants of Technological Innovation: 8. Technical change in the commercial aircraft industry, 1925–1975 David C. Mowery and Nathan Rosenberg; 9. The economic implications of the VSLI revolution Nathan Rosenberg and W. Edward Steinmueller; 10. The influence of market demand upon innovation: a critical review of some recent empirical studies David C. Mowery and Nathan Rosenberg; Part IV. Technology Transfer and Leadership: The International Context: 11. The international transfer of technology: implications for the industrialised countries; 12. US technological leadership and foreign competition: de te fabula narratur?; Index.


David C. Mowery, Nathan Rosenberg, W. Edward Steinmueller

printer iconPrinter friendly version AddThis