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The Correspondence of Charles Darwin
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  • 9 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 824 pages
  • Size: 234 x 156 mm
  • Weight: 1.32 kg
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 (ISBN-13: 9780521442411 | ISBN-10: 0521442419)

DOI: 10.2277/0521442419

  • Published April 1993

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

 (Stock level updated: 02:09 GMT, 28 November 2015)


The correspondence in this volume is dominated by the public and private response to the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species. Volume 8 opens with Darwin eagerly scrutinising each new review, as one by one all the major organs of the day carried notices of the book. To those who express their views privately in letters, Darwin responds patiently and thoughtfully, answering their objections and attempting to guide their fuller understanding of the operation of natural selection. His more personal thoughts emerge in letters to his friends Joseph Dalton Hooker, Charles Lyell, and Thomas Henry Huxley. This volume presents a wealth of detailed information, giving the full range of response to the Origin and revealing how the Victorians coped with a theory that many well recognised would revolutionise thinking about the organic world and human ancestry.

• Much acclaimed edition • Covers the continuing controversy stimulated by publication of the Origin of Species


List of illustrations; List of letters; Introduction; Acknowledgements; List of provenances; Note on editorial policy; Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy; Abbreviations and symbols; The Correspondence, 1860; Appendixes; Manuscript alterations and comments; Bibliography; Bibliographical register and index to correspondents; Index.


'So important are the events of 1860, and so engaging are the letters, that the volume has much to offer a wide intellectual audience. It is a splendid example of the high calibre of historical research that has come to be associated with the Darwin industry.' Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis, Trends in Ecology

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