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Discoveries of the Census of Marine Life

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This title has free online support material available.

Details

  • 110 colour illus. 3 tables
  • Page extent: 286 pages
  • Size: 246 x 189 mm
  • Weight: 0.78 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 578.77
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: QH91.8.B6 S64 2010
  • LC Subject headings:
    • Marine biodiversity
    • Census of Marine Life (Program)
    • Marine ecology
    • Marine biology--Research--Methodology
    • Ocean

Library of Congress Record

Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9781107000131)

  • Also available in Paperback
  • Published October 2010

Replaced by 9780521165129

 (Stock level updated: 02:06 GMT, 03 September 2015)

£60.00

Over the 10-year course of the recently completed Census of Marine Life, a global network of researchers in more than 80 nations has collaborated to improve our understanding of marine biodiversity - past, present, and future. Providing insight into this remarkable project, this book explains the rationale behind the Census and highlights some of its most important and dramatic findings, illustrated with full-color photographs throughout. It explores how new technologies and partnerships have contributed to greater knowledge of marine life, from unknown species and habitats, to migration routes and distribution patterns, and to a better appreciation of how the oceans are changing. Looking to the future, it identifies what needs to be done to close the remaining gaps in our knowledge and provide information that will enable us to better manage resources, conserve diversity, reverse habitat losses, and respond to global climate change.

• Chronicles the world's first complete census of biodiversity in the world's oceans, providing the reader with an insight into this remarkable project • Coverage of the whole range of marine habitats - from shoreline to deep abyss and from the Arctic to the Antarctic - providing data from areas of the world that have never before been studied • Looks to the future, considering how we can close the remaining knowledge gaps and work towards sustainable ocean use

Contents

Foreword; Preface; Introduction; Part I. The Unknown. Why a Census?: 1. Planet Ocean; 2. The ocean environments; 3. A riot of species from microbes to whales; Part II. The Known. What has the Census Learned?: 4. New ways of seeing deeper and farther; 5. Around the ocean rim; 6. At the ends of the Earth; 7. Ocean life in motion; 8. Into the deep; 9. Changing ocean; Part III. From Unknown to Unknowable: 10. Planet Ocean beyond 2010; Index.

Reviews

'… highly readable … illustrated throughout with photographs of fascinating species … The more information we possess, the better we can act to sustain the marine resources, and the Census is a vital starting point for the expansion of our knowledge. This book conveys the enthusiasm the author feels for his subject, and is well worth reading for anyone curious about the life that exists beneath the surface of the ocean.' Blusci: Cambridge University Science Magazine

'This pacey book captures the excitement, adventure and pioneering spirit of this band of dedicated researchers, intent on increasing knowledge of marine life to ensure its sustainability. Beautifully illustrated with clear diagrams and spectacular photographs of many new and bizarre discoveries, it would be easy to say this book should be read by anyone with an interest in marine life, more than that it should be read by everyone with a stake in the future of planet Earth (or is that planet Ocean?).' Marine Scientist

'The self-stated goal of the book - 'to bring the excitement of the Census and its findings to as broad an audience as possible' - has, I believe, been achieved. Not that everyone will want to read it from cover to cover, but there is something in here for nearly everyone, and appreciating the magnitude of this research collaboration [it] should be an inspiration to all scientists.' Ed Jackiewicz, Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers

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