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Human Mobility and Technological Transfer in the Prehistoric Mediterranean

$99.99 (C)

Part of British School at Athens Studies in Greek Antiquity

C. Knappett, E. Kiriatzi, C. Broodbank, D. Urem-Kotsou, M. Georgakopoulou, A. Bevan, E. Bloxam, A. J. Shortland, I. Nikolakopoulou, M.-C. Boileau, S. Andreou, K. Kristiansen, E. Blake, O. P. Gosselain
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  • Date Published: December 2016
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107142435

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About the Authors
  • The diverse forms of regional connectivity in the ancient world have recently become an important focus for those interested in the deep history of globalisation. This volume represents a significant contribution to this new trend as it engages thematically with a wide range of connectivities in the later prehistory of the Mediterranean, from the later Neolithic of northern Greece to the Levantine Iron Age, and with diverse forms of materiality, from pottery and metal to stone and glass. With theoretical overviews from leading thinkers in prehistoric mobilities, and commentaries from top specialists in neighbouring domains, the volume integrates detailed case studies within a comparative framework. The result is a thorough treatment of many of the key issues of regional interaction and technological diversity facing archaeologists working across diverse places and periods. As this book presents key case studies for human and technological mobility across the eastern Mediterranean in later prehistory, it will be of interest primarily to Mediterranean archaeologists, though also to historians and anthropologists.

    • Presents 'deep history' of mobilities, as tracked through technologies
    • Showcases how archaeology can contribute to much wider questions concerning the roles of mobilities and materialities in globalisation
    • Leverages rich datasets from the Mediterranean to inform theoretical debates on mobility
    • Readers will be able to think through mobility with detailed case studies
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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 2016
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107142435
    • length: 296 pages
    • dimensions: 254 x 180 x 17 mm
    • weight: 0.74kg
    • contains: 26 b/w illus. 11 maps 2 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Technological mobilities: perspectives from the eastern Mediterranean - an introduction C. Knappett and E. Kiriatzi
    2. The transmitting sea: a Mediterranean perspective C. Broodbank
    3. Changing pottery technology in the later Neolithic in Macedonia, North Greece D. Urem-Kotsou
    4. Mobility and Early Bronze Age Aegean metal production M. Georgakopoulou
    5. Stonemasons and craft mobility in the Bronze Age eastern Mediterranean A. Bevan and E. Bloxam
    6. Towards an understanding of the origin of Late Bronze Age Greek glass A. J. Shortland
    7. Mobilities in the Neopalatial southern Aegean: the case of Minoanisation I. Nikolakopoulou and C. Knappett
    8. The archaeological signatures of mobility: a technological look at 'Aegeanising' pottery from the northern Levant at the end of the second millennium BCE M.-C. Boileau
    9. Mycenaean and Mycenaeanising pottery across the Mediterranean: a multi-scalar approach to technological mobility, transmission and appropriation E. Kiriatzi and S. Andreou
    10. Interpreting Bronze Age trade and migration K. Kristiansen
    11. Commentary. States and technological mobility: a view from the West E. Blake
    12. Commentary. On fluxes, connections, and their archaeological manifestations O. P. Gosselain.

  • Editors

    Evangelia Kiriatzi, British School at Athens
    Evangelia Kiriatzi is Director of the Fitch Laboratory for science-based archaeology at the British School at Athens and Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. She has published Pottery Production and Supply at Bronze Age Kolonna, Aegina: An Integrated Archaeological and Scientific Study of a Ceramic Landscape (with Walter Gauss, 2011). She carries out studies and fieldwork at numerous prehistoric sites across the Aegean, southern Balkans and Anatolia, and co-directs the Kythera Island Project (with Cyprian Broodbank), investigating the long-term cultural and environmental history of a Mediterranean island.

    Carl Knappett, University of Toronto
    Carl Knappett teaches in the Department of Art at the University of Toronto, where he holds the Walter Graham/Homer Thompson Chair in Aegean Prehistory. His previous books include Thinking Through Material Culture (2005), An Archaeology of Interaction (2014), and Network Analysis in Archaeology (2013). He conducts fieldwork at various Bronze Age sites across the Aegean, and directs the new excavations at the Minoan town of Palaikastro in east Crete.

    Contributors

    C. Knappett, E. Kiriatzi, C. Broodbank, D. Urem-Kotsou, M. Georgakopoulou, A. Bevan, E. Bloxam, A. J. Shortland, I. Nikolakopoulou, M.-C. Boileau, S. Andreou, K. Kristiansen, E. Blake, O. P. Gosselain

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