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From Hellenism to Islam
Cultural and Linguistic Change in the Roman Near East

$139.00 (C)

Fergus Millar, Werner Eck, Benjamin Isaac, Seth Schwartz, Marijana Ricl, Angelos Chaniotis, Hannah M. Cotton, Nicole Belayche, Walter Ameling, Ted Kaizer, Jonathan Price, Shlomo Naeh, Sebastian Brock, Dan Barag, Gideon Bohak, Axel Knauf, Leah Di Segni, Robert Hoyland, Sebastian Richter, Arietta Papaconstantinou
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  • Date Published: September 2009
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521875813

$ 139.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • The eight hundred years between the first Roman conquests and the conquest of Islam saw a rich, constantly shifting blend of languages and writing systems, legal structures, religious practices and beliefs in the Near East. While the different ethnic groups and cultural forms often clashed with each other, adaptation was as much a characteristic of the region as conflict. This volume, emphasizing the inscriptions in many languages from the Near East, brings together mutually informative studies by scholars in diverse fields. Together, they reveal how the different languages, peoples and cultures interacted, competed with, tried to ignore or were influenced by each other, and how their relationships evolved over time. It will be of great value to those interested in Greek and Roman history, Jewish history and Near Eastern studies.

    • Sheds new light on a subject that is often misunderstood
    • Brings together contributors from a wide and diverse range of disciplines and specialities
    • No other book on the complex subject of the Roman Near East possesses such variety and depth
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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2009
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521875813
    • length: 514 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 33 mm
    • weight: 0.92kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Fergus Millar
    Part I. The Language of Power: Latin in the Roman Near East:
    1. The presence, role and significance of Latin in the epigraphy and culture of the Roman Near East Werner Eck
    2. Latin in cities of the Roman Near East Benjamin Isaac
    Part II. Social and Legal Institutions as Reflected in the Documentary Evidence:
    3. Euergetism in Josephus and the epigraphic culture of first-century Jerusalem Seth Schwartz
    4. Legal and social status of threptoi and related categories in narrative and documentary sources Marijana Ricl
    5. Ritual performances of divine justice: the epigraphy of confession, atonement, and exaltation in Roman Asia Minor Angelos Chaniotis
    6. Continuity of Nabataean law in the Petra papyri: a methodological exercise Hannah M. Cotton
    Part III. The Epigraphic Language of Religion:
    7. 'Languages' and religion in second-fourth century Palestine. In search of the impact of Rome Nicole Belayche
    8. The epigraphic habit and the Jewish diasporas of Asia Minor and Syria Walter Ameling
    9. Religion and language in Dura-Europos Ted Kaizer
    Part IV. Linguistic Metamorphoses and Continuity of Cultures:
    10. On the margins of culture: the practice of transcription in the ancient world Jonathan Price and Shlomo Naeh
    11. Edessene Syriac inscriptions in late antique Syria Sebastian Brock
    12. Samaritan writing and writings Dan Barag
    13. The Jewish magical tradition from late antique Palestine to the Cairo Geniza Gideon Bohak
    Part V. Greek into Arabic:
    14. The Nabataean connection of the Benei Hezir Axel Knauf
    15. Greek inscriptions in transition from the Byzantine to the early Islamic period Leah Di Segni
    16. Arab kings, Arab tribes and the beginnings of Arab historical memory in late Roman epigraphy Robert Hoyland
    17. Greek, Coptic, and the 'language of the Hijra': rise and decline of the Coptic language in late antique and medieval Egypt Sebastian Richter
    18. 'What remains behind': Hellenism and Romanitas in Christian Egypt after the Arab conquest Arietta Papaconstantinou.

  • Editors

    Hannah M. Cotton, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Robert G. Hoyland, University of St Andrews, Scotland

    Jonathan J. Price, Tel-Aviv University

    David J. Wasserstein, Vanderbilt University, Tennessee

    Contributors

    Fergus Millar, Werner Eck, Benjamin Isaac, Seth Schwartz, Marijana Ricl, Angelos Chaniotis, Hannah M. Cotton, Nicole Belayche, Walter Ameling, Ted Kaizer, Jonathan Price, Shlomo Naeh, Sebastian Brock, Dan Barag, Gideon Bohak, Axel Knauf, Leah Di Segni, Robert Hoyland, Sebastian Richter, Arietta Papaconstantinou

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