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Representations of War in Ancient Rome

Representations of War in Ancient Rome

$139.99

Katherine E. Welch, Tonio Holscher, Jonathan P. Roth, Myles McDonnell, Laura S. Klar, Michael Koortbojian, Rachel Kousser, Sheila Dillon, Susann Lusnia, William V. Harris
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  • Date Published: May 2006
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521848176

$139.99
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About the Authors
  • War suffused Roman life to a degree unparalleled in other ancient societies. Although the place of war in ancient Roman culture has been the subject of many studies, this book examines how Romans represented war, in both visual imagery and in literary accounts. Spanning a broad chronological range, from the mid-fourth century BC to the third century AD, the essays in this volume consider audience reception, the reconstruction of display contexts, as well as the language of images, which could be either explicit or allusive in representations of war. They also analyze the construction of the Romans' view of themselves, their past, and their future.

    • First book to address Roman representations of war
    • Goes beyond literal representations of war: also examines literary and allegorical representations
    • The chapters encompass a wide variety of art media such as architecture, painting, sculpture, building, relief, coin etc.
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "The reader who seeks to add to their understanding of Roman culture by flipping through the book will be amply rewarded, and historians who might take a dim view of the usefulness of art as a tool for interpreting Roman culture will find themselves repeatedly corrected...The work here demonstrates an ingenious use of art history to open a broad window on Roman society--a lot more of the history of Rome can be explained by the study of looted statues than one might think." -- Bryn Mawr Classical Review

    "Anyone interested in Roman preoccupation with war...and the centrality of asserted military success in Roman culture and ideology will want a copy of this book." -- Choice

    "Overall, on first glance, one might be tempted to relegate this volume to the realm of art history or classics. That would be a shame. Although several of the articles do have one foot firmly in those camps, and there is much here that may be a bit specialized, it is certainly useful for those with an interest in the ideology and representation of Roman imperialism and warfare." - Joseph Frechette, U.S. Army Center of Military History, H-NET

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    Product details

    • Date Published: May 2006
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521848176
    • length: 382 pages
    • dimensions: 261 x 184 x 26 mm
    • weight: 1.138kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Katherine E. Welch
    1. The transformation of victory into power: from event to structure Tonio Holscher
    2. Siege narrative in Livy: representation and reality Jonathan P. Roth
    3. Roman aesthetics and the spoils of Syracuse Myles McDonnell
    4. Domi Militiaeque: Roman domestic aesthetics and war booty in the Republic Katherine E. Welch
    5. The origins of the Roman Scaenae Frons and the architecture of triumphal games in the second century B.C. Laura S. Klar
    6. The bringer of victory: imagery and institutions at the advent of empire Michael Koortbojian
    7. Conquest and desire: Roman Victoria in public and provincial sculpture Rachel Kousser
    8. Women on the columns of Trajan and Marcus Aurelius and the visual language of Roman victory Sheila Dillon
    9. Battle imagery and politics on the Severan arch in the Roman Forum Susann Lusnia
    10. Readings in the narrative literature of Roman courage William V. Harris.

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    Representations of War in Ancient Rome

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  • Instructors have used or reviewed this title for the following courses

    • Ancient Rome
    • Roman Civilization
    • The Roman Revolution
    • Western Civilization I
  • Editors

    Sheila Dillon, Duke University, North Carolina
    Sheila Dillon is Associate Professor of Art History at Duke University. She is the author of Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture: Contexts, Styles and Subjects (Cambridge University Press, 2006).

    Katherine E. Welch, New York University
    Katherine E. Welch is Associate Professor of Fine Arts at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She is the author of The Roman Amphitheater: From its Origins to the Colosseum (Cambridge University Press, 2006).

    Contributors

    Katherine E. Welch, Tonio Holscher, Jonathan P. Roth, Myles McDonnell, Laura S. Klar, Michael Koortbojian, Rachel Kousser, Sheila Dillon, Susann Lusnia, William V. Harris

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