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Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama

Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama

$103.00 (C)

  • Date Published: January 2012
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521762731

$103.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Oaths were ubiquitous rituals in ancient Athenian legal, commercial, civic and international spheres. Their importance is reflected by the fact that much of surviving Greek drama features a formal oath sworn before the audience. This is the first comprehensive study of that phenomenon. The book explores how the oath can mark or structure a dramatic plot, at times compelling characters like Euripides' Hippolytus to act contrary to their best interests. It demonstrates how dramatic oaths resonate with oath rituals familiar to the Athenian audiences. Aristophanes' Lysistrata and her accomplices, for example, swear an oath that blends protocols of international treaties with priestesses' vows of sexual abstinence. By employing the principles of Speech Act theory, this book examines how the performative power of the dramatic oath can mirror the status quo, but also disturb categories of gender, social status and civic identity in ways that redistribute and confound social authority.

    • The first comprehensive study of a frequent literary device in Greek drama
    • Contributes to a wide body of literature on the construction of gender in Greek drama and more broadly in Greek society in general
    • Illustrates how oath-swearing scenes in drama reflect historical oaths, treaties and contracts in ancient Athens
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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2012
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521762731
    • length: 288 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 158 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.6kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. From curses to blessings: horkos in the Oresteia
    2. Speaking like a man: Sophocles' Trachiniae and Philoctetes
    3. Horkos in the polis: Athens, Thebes, and Sophocles
    4. Perjury and other perversions: Euripides' Phoenissae, Orestes, and Cyclops
    5. Twisted justice in Aristophanes' Clouds
    6. Women and oaths in Euripides
    7. How to do things with Euripides: Aristophanes' Thesmophoriazusae
    8. Swearing off sex in Aristophanes' Lysistrata
    Conclusion.

  • Author

    Judith Fletcher, Wilfrid Laurier University, Ontario
    Judith Fletcher is Associate Professor in the Department of History at Wilfrid Laurier University. She is the author of numerous articles and chapters on ancient Greek poetry, drama, religion and law and has co-edited Virginity Revisited: Configurations of the Unpossessed Body (with Bonnie MacLachlan, 2007) and Horkos: The Oath in Greek Society (with Alan H. Sommerstein, 2007).

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