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Growing Up Fatherless in Antiquity

$119.99

Sabine R. Hübner, David M. Ratzan, Walter Scheidel, Mark Golden, Marcus Sigismund, Daniel Ogden, Myrto Malouta, Louise Pratt, Georg Wöhrle, Judith P. Hallett, Sabine Müller, Ann-Cathrin Harders, Neil W. Bernstein, Raffaella Cribiore, Geoffrey Nathan
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  • Date Published: March 2009
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521490504

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  • As the changes in the traditional family accelerated toward the end of the twentieth century, a great deal of attention came to focus on fathers, both modern and ancient. While academics and politicians alike singled out the conspicuous and growing absence of the modern father as a crucial factor affecting contemporary family and social dynamics, ancient historians and classicists have rarely explored ancient father-absence, despite the likelihood that nearly a third of all children in the ancient Mediterranean world were fatherless before they turned fifteen. The proportion of children raised by single mothers, relatives, step-parents, or others was thus at least as high in antiquity as it is today. This book assesses the wide-ranging impact high levels of chronic father-absence had on the cultures, politics, and families of the ancient world.

    • Gives the reader a cross-cultural overview on the problem of growing up fatherless in ancient and modern societies
    • Contains invaluable demographic information
    • Essays drawn from a wide range of periods, regions and cultures establish a useful socio-historical context for the reader
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    Reviews & endorsements

    “Uniformly excellent…………. The chapters in this book are very effective reminders of the lasting emotional distress of growing up without a father......... this book represents a welcome attempt to supplement demographic studies of ancient families with investigations of specific situations involving historical actors and literary characters.” --AHB Online Review

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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2009
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521490504
    • length: 350 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.64kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of figures
    List of tables
    List of contributors
    Acknowledgements
    Note on abbreviations
    Introduction:
    1. Fatherless antiquity? Perspectives on 'fatherlessness' in the ancient Mediterranean Sabine R. Hübner and David M. Ratzan
    Part I. Coping with Demographic Realities:
    2. The demographic background Walter Scheidel
    3. Oedipal complexities Mark Golden
    4. Callirhoe's dilemma: remarriage and stepfathers in the Graeco-Roman east Sabine R. Hübner
    5. 'Without father, without mother, without genealogy': fatherlessness in the Old and New Testaments Marcus Sigismund
    Part II. Virtual Fatherlessness:
    6. Bastardy and fatherlessness in ancient Greece Daniel Ogden
    7. Fatherlessness and formal identification in Roman Egypt Myrto Malouta
    Part III. Roles without Models:
    8. Diomedes, the fatherless hero of the Iliad Louise Pratt
    9. Sons (and daughters) without fathers: fatherlessness in the Homeric epics Georg Wöhrle
    10. Absent Roman fathers in the writings of their daughters: Cornelia and Sulpicia Judith P. Hallett
    Part IV. Rhetoric of Loss:
    11. The disadvantages and advantages of being fatherless: the case of Sulla Sabine Müller
    12. An imperial family man: Augustus as surrogate father to Marcus Antonius' children Ann-Cathrin Harders
    13. Cui parens non erat maximus quisque et uetustissimus pro parente: parental surrogates in imperial Roman literature Neil W.Bernstein
    14. The education of orphans: a reassessment of the evidence of Libanius Raffaella Cribiore
    15. 'Woe to those making widows their prey and robbing the fatherless': Christian ideals and the obligations of stepfathers in late antiquity Geoffrey Nathan
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Editors

    Sabine R. Hübner, Columbia University, New York

    David M. Ratzan, Columbia University, New York

    Contributors

    Sabine R. Hübner, David M. Ratzan, Walter Scheidel, Mark Golden, Marcus Sigismund, Daniel Ogden, Myrto Malouta, Louise Pratt, Georg Wöhrle, Judith P. Hallett, Sabine Müller, Ann-Cathrin Harders, Neil W. Bernstein, Raffaella Cribiore, Geoffrey Nathan

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