Skip to content
Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist

Entrepreneurship, Geography, and American Economic Growth

$37.00 ( ) USD

  • Date Published: August 2006
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511222917

$ 37.00 USD ( )
Adobe eBook Reader

You will be taken to ebooks.com for this purchase
Buy eBook Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback, Hardback


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • The spillovers in knowledge among largely college-educated workers were among the key reasons for the impressive degree of economic growth and spread of entrepreneurship in the United States during the 1990s. Prior 'industrial policies' in the 1970s and 1980s did not advance growth because these were based on outmoded large manufacturing models. Zoltan Acs and Catherine Armington use a knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship to explain new firm formation rates in regional economies during the 1990s period and beyond. The fastest-growing regions are those that have the highest rates of new firm formation, and which are not dominated by large businesses. The authors of this text also find support for the thesis that knowledge spillovers move across industries and are not confined within a single industry. As a result, they suggest, regional policies to encourage and sustain growth should focus on entrepreneurship among other factors.

    • Internationally known senior author on entrepreneurship and economic growth
    • Was the first book entirely devoted to explaining how entrepreneurship stimulates economic growth at regional level
    • Draws on US Bureau of the Census data in unique fashion; lessons may be applied outside the US
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "I would encourage all researchers interested in entrepreneurship or economic geography to look at this volume. Acs and Armington identify numerous empircal regularities that should stimulate the development of new theories and motivate more casually oriented empirical investigations of particular mechanisms. And the appendices provide a wealth of descriptive information on regions that others may use to incorporate information from LEEM/BIC data into their own research." - Olav Sorenson, University of Toronto, Administrative Science Quarterly

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2006
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511222917
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction
    2. Entrepreneurship and economic growth
    3. Regional variation in entrepreneurial activity
    4. Human capital and entrepreneurship
    5. Entrepreneurship and employment growth
    6. Summary and conclusions
    7. A formulation of entrepreneurship policy.

  • Authors

    Zoltan J. Acs, George Mason University, Virginia

    Catherine Armington

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×