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Markets, Money and Capital
Hicksian Economics for the Twenty First Century

$64.99 (Z)

Roberto Scazzieri, Stefano Zamagni, Amartya Sen, Paul A. Samuelson, Luigi L. Pasinetti, Ganpaolo Mariutti, Maria Cristina Marcuzzo, Eleonora Sanfilippo, Andrew Schuller, Warren Young, Christopher J. Bliss, Pierluigi Ciocca, Marcello De Cecco, Paolo Onofri, Anna Stagni, Alberto Quadrio Curzio, Omar Hamouda, Rainer Masera, Carlo D'Adda, Riccardo Cesari, Robert M. Solow, Mauro Baranzini, Piero Ferri, Kumaraswamy Vela Velupillai, Harald Hagemann, Erich Streissler, Mario Amendola, Jean-Luc Gaffard
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  • Date Published: March 2011
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521188791

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  • Sir John Hicks (1904–89) was a leading economic theorist of the twentieth century, and along with Kenneth Arrow was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1972. His work addressed central topics in economic theory, such as value, money, capital and growth. An important unifying theme was the attention for economic rationality 'in time' and his acknowledgement that apparent rigidities and frictions might exert a positive role as a buffer against excessive fluctuations in output, prices and employment. This emphasis on the virtue of imperfection significantly distances Hicksian economics from both the Keynesian and Monetarist approaches. Containing contributions from distinguished theorists in their own right (including three Nobel Prize winners), this volume examines Hicks's intellectual heritage and discusses how his ideas suggest a distinct approach to economic theory and policy making. It will be of great interest to scholars and students of economic theory and the history of economic thought.

    • Provided the first comprehensive assessment of the lifework of one of the most influential economists of the twentieth century
    • Discusses areas in which Hicks's ideas suggest a distinct approach to economic theory and policy
    • An authoritative volume written by those who knew him best - his former colleagues and pupils
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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2011
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521188791
    • length: 466 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 26 mm
    • weight: 0.68kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Between theory and history: on the identity of Hicks's economics Roberto Scazzieri and Stefano Zamagni
    Part I. The Intellectual Heritage of John Hicks:
    1. Hicks on liberty Amartya Sen
    2. An economist even greater than his high reputation Paul A. Samuelson
    3. Hicks's 'conversion' - from J. R. to John Luigi L. Pasinetti and Ganpaolo Mariutti
    4. Dear John, dear Ursula (Cambridge and LSE, 1935):
    88 letters unearthed Maria Cristina Marcuzzo and Eleonora Sanfilippo
    5. John Hicks and his publishers Andrew Schuller
    6. Hicks in reviews, 1932–89: from 'The Theory of Wages' to 'A Market Theory of Money' Warren Young
    Part II. Markets:
    7. John Hicks and the emptiness of general equilibrium theory Christopher J. Bliss
    8. Hicks vs. Marx? On the theory of economic history Pierluigi Ciocca
    9. Hicks's notion and use of fix-price and flex-price Marcello De Cecco
    10. On the Hicksian definition of income in applied economic analysis Paolo Onofri and Anna Stagni
    Part III. Money:
    11. Historical stylizations and monetary theory Alberto Quadrio Curzio and Roberto Scazzieri
    12. Hicks: money, prices and credit management Omar Hamouda
    13. Core, mantle and industry: a monetary perspective of Banks' capital standards Rainer Masera
    14. A suggestion for simplifying the theory of asset prices Carlo D'Adda and Riccardo Cesari
    Part IV. Capital and dynamics:
    15. 'Distribution and economic progress' after 70 years Robert M. Solow
    16. Flexible saving and economic growth Mauro Baranzini
    17. The economics of nonlinear cycles Piero Ferri
    18. Perspective on a Hicksian non-linear theory of the trade cycle Kumaraswamy Vela Velupillai
    19. Capital, growth and production disequilibria: on the employment consequences of new technologies Harald Hagemann
    20. Capital and time Erich Streissler
    21. Sequential analysis and out-of-equilibrium paths Mario Amendola and Jean-Luc Gaffard.

  • Editors

    Roberto Scazzieri, Università degli Studi, Bologna, Italy

    Amartya Sen, Harvard University, Massachusetts

    Stefano Zamagni, Università degli Studi, Bologna, Italy

    Contributors

    Roberto Scazzieri, Stefano Zamagni, Amartya Sen, Paul A. Samuelson, Luigi L. Pasinetti, Ganpaolo Mariutti, Maria Cristina Marcuzzo, Eleonora Sanfilippo, Andrew Schuller, Warren Young, Christopher J. Bliss, Pierluigi Ciocca, Marcello De Cecco, Paolo Onofri, Anna Stagni, Alberto Quadrio Curzio, Omar Hamouda, Rainer Masera, Carlo D'Adda, Riccardo Cesari, Robert M. Solow, Mauro Baranzini, Piero Ferri, Kumaraswamy Vela Velupillai, Harald Hagemann, Erich Streissler, Mario Amendola, Jean-Luc Gaffard

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