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Behavioural Public Policy

$34.99 (Z)

Adam Oliver, Christopher Exeter, Gwyn Bevan, Barbara Fasolo, Charitini Stavropoulou, Kate Disney, Julian Le Grand, Giles Atkinson, Richard Cookson, Paul Slovic, Daniel Västfjäll, Jonathan Wolff, Matthew Rabin, Alex Voorhoeve, Sunita Sah, Daylian M. Cain, George Loewenstein, Robert Sugden, Bruno Frey, Matteo M. Galizzi, Paul Dolan, Sander van der Linden, Drazen Prelec, Luc Bovens
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  • Date Published: December 2013
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107617377

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About the Authors
  • How can individuals best be encouraged to take more responsibility for their well-being and their environment or to behave more ethically in their business transactions? Across the world, governments are showing a growing interest in using behavioural economic research to inform the design of nudges which, some suggest, might encourage citizens to adopt beneficial patterns of behaviour. In this fascinating collection, leading academic economists, psychologists and philosophers reflect on how behavioural economic findings can be used to help inform the design of policy initiatives in the areas of health, education, the environment, personal finances and worker remuneration. Each chapter is accompanied by a shorter 'response' that provides critical commentary and an alternative perspective. This accessible book will interest academic researchers, graduate students and policy-makers across a range of disciplinary perspectives.

    • A selection of the world's leading behavioural economists apply behavioural science research to practical policy concerns in the areas of health, education, the environment, personal finances and worker remuneration
    • Will appeal to people across a range of disciplinary backgrounds - students, practitioners and policy makers who are interested in the contributions that behavioural economics can make
    • Each chapter is accompanied by a shorter 'response' to provide commentary and an alternative perspective to help readers engage more fully with the issues raised
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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 2013
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107617377
    • length: 249 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 x 14 mm
    • weight: 0.37kg
    • contains: 18 b/w illus. 6 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Adam Oliver
    1. Ambiguity aversion and the UK government's response to swine flu Adam Oliver
    1.1 A response to Oliver Christopher Exeter
    2. Models of governance of public services: empirical and behavioural analysis of 'Econs' and 'Humans' Gwyn Bevan and Barbara Fasolo
    2.1 A response to Bevan and Fasolo Charitini Stavropoulou
    3. From irresponsible knaves to responsible knights for just 5p: behavioural public policy and the environment Kate Disney, Julian Le Grand and Giles Atkinson
    3.1 A response to Disney, Le Grand and Atkinson Richard Cookson
    4. The more who die, the less we care: psychic numbing and genocide Paul Slovic and Daniel Västfjäll
    4.1 A response to Slovic and Västfjäll Jonathan Wolff
    5. Healthy habits: some thoughts on the role of public policy in healthful eating and exercise under limited rationality Matthew Rabin
    5.1 A response to Rabin Alex Voorhoeve
    6. Confessing one's sins but still committing them: transparency and the failure of disclosure Sunita Sah, Daylian M. Cain and George Loewenstein
    6.1 A response to Sah, Cain and Loewenstein Robert Sugden
    7. How should people be rewarded for their work? Bruno Frey
    7.1 A response to Frey Matteo M. Galizzi
    8. Influencing the financial behaviour of individuals: the mindspace way Paul Dolan
    8.1 A response to Dolan Sander van der Linden
    9. Decision analysis from a neo-calvinist point of view Drazen Prelec
    9.1 A response to Prelec Luc Bovens
    Index.

  • Editor

    Adam Oliver, London School of Economics and Political Science
    Adam Oliver is a reader in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Dr Oliver's principal research interests focus upon behavioural economics and its applications to public and private decision making, on which he has published extensively. He is founding editor of the journal Health Economics, Policy and Law.

    Contributors

    Adam Oliver, Christopher Exeter, Gwyn Bevan, Barbara Fasolo, Charitini Stavropoulou, Kate Disney, Julian Le Grand, Giles Atkinson, Richard Cookson, Paul Slovic, Daniel Västfjäll, Jonathan Wolff, Matthew Rabin, Alex Voorhoeve, Sunita Sah, Daylian M. Cain, George Loewenstein, Robert Sugden, Bruno Frey, Matteo M. Galizzi, Paul Dolan, Sander van der Linden, Drazen Prelec, Luc Bovens

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