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Godly Kingship in Restoration England

Godly Kingship in Restoration England
The Politics of The Royal Supremacy, 1660–1688

$32.99 (C)

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Part of Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History

  • Date Published: January 2014
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107689886

$ 32.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • The position of English monarchs as supreme governors of the Church of England profoundly affected early modern politics and religion. This innovative book explores how tensions in church-state relations created by Henry VIII's Reformation continued to influence relationships between the crown, parliament and common law during the Restoration, a distinct phase in England's 'long Reformation'. Debates about the powers of kings and parliaments, the treatment of Dissenters and emerging concepts of toleration were viewed through a Reformation prism where legitimacy depended on godly status. This book discusses how the institutional, legal and ideological framework of supremacy perpetuated the language of godly kingship after 1660 and how supremacy was complicated by the ambivalent Tudor legacy. It was manipulated by not only Anglicans, but also tolerant kings and intolerant parliaments, Catholics, Dissenters and radicals like Thomas Hobbes. Invented to uphold the religious and political establishments, supremacy paradoxically ended up subverting them.

    • Reconfigures the chronology of the early modern period, drawing on recent historiography to position the Restoration as part of a 'long Reformation'
    • Brings the history of political thought into discussion of political and religious history
    • Develops an understanding of the complexities in the emerging concept of toleration
    Read more

    Awards

    • Winner of the 2012 Royal Historical Society Whitfield Prize

    Reviews & endorsements

    "… a major achievement. Thanks to its ambitious scope, and thoughtful dissection of the works of so many thinkers, it will become an indispensable guide to some of the most important questions about church and state in the 16th and 17th centuries."
    Christopher Brooks, Reviews in History

    "This is an excellent book."
    Grant Tapsell, Renaissance Quarterly

    "This book is to be thoroughly recommended to all students of the later seventeenth century."
    John Spurr, Journal of British Studies

    "Godly Kingship is likely to prove enduringly useful to scholars of the Restoration."
    Joel Swann, The Seventeenth Century

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2014
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107689886
    • length: 332 pages
    • dimensions: 230 x 152 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.49kg
    • contains: 1 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: the Restoration, the Reformation, and the royal supremacy
    1. Foundations and legacies: the Reformation and the royal supremacies, 1530–1660
    2. The Crown and the Cavalier Anglicans: prerogative, Parliament, and ecclesiastical law
    3. Spiritual authority and royal jurisdiction: the question of bishops
    4. Dissenters and the supremacy: the question of toleration
    5. Anticlericals and 'Erastians': the spectre of Hobbes
    6. Catholics and Anglicans: James II and Catholic supremacy
    Conclusion.

  • Author

    Jacqueline Rose, University of St Andrews, Scotland
    Jacqueline Rose is a lecturer and Director of Studies at Newnham College, Cambridge. She researches and teaches extensively on early modern political, religious and intellectual history.

    Awards

    • Winner of the 2012 Royal Historical Society Whitfield Prize

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