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The Origins and Development of Financial Markets and Institutions
From the Seventeenth Century to the Present

$49.99

Jeremy Atack, Stephen Quinn, William Roberds, Oscar Gelderblom, Joost Jonker, François R. Velde, Gary S. Shea, Marc Flandreau, Christophe Galimard, Clemens Jobst, Pilar Nogues Marco, Richard Sylla, Larry Neal, Richard J. Sullivan, Eugene N. White, Richard C. K. Burdekin, Marc D. Weidenmier, Alan Dye, Richard Sicotte, Kirsten Wandschneider, Michael Bordo, David Wheelock
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  • Date Published: April 2011
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521154765

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  • Collectively, mankind has never had it so good despite periodic economic crises of which the current sub-prime crisis is merely the latest example. Much of this success is attributable to the increasing efficiency of the world's financial institutions as finance has proved to be one of the most important causal factors in economic performance. In a series of insightful essays, financial and economic historians examine how financial innovations from the seventeenth century to the present have continually challenged established institutional arrangements, forcing change and adaptation by governments, financial intermediaries, and financial markets. Where these have been successful, wealth creation and growth have followed. When they failed, growth slowed and sometimes economic decline has followed. These essays illustrate the difficulties of co-ordinating financial innovations in order to sustain their benefits for the wider economy, a theme that will be of interest to policy makers as well as economic historians.

    • Essays by leading experts reflect the current state of economic thinking on a topic of vital importance to national and global economic performance
    • A variety of international case studies show the diversity of experiences and the difficulty of adapting to change swiftly
    • Extensive list of sources provided by each author serves as a starting point for further research
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    "This volume offers a substantial contribution to scholarship that will be of interest to many readers.... Recommended." - Choice

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2011
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521154765
    • length: 496 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 28 mm
    • weight: 0.72kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of figures
    List of tables
    List of contributors
    1. Financial innovations and crises: the view backwards from Northern Rock Jeremy Atack
    2. An economic explanation of the early Bank of Amsterdam, debasement, bills of exchange and the emergence of the first Central Bank Stephen Quinn and William Roberds
    3. With a view to hold: the emergence of institutional investors on the Amsterdam securities market during the 17th and 18th centuries Oscar Gelderblom and Joost Jonker
    4. Was John Law's system a bubble? The Mississippi Bubble revisited François R. Velde
    5. Sir George Caswall vs. the Duke of Portland: financial contracts and litigation in the wake of the South Sea Bubble Gary S. Shea
    6. The Bell Jar: commercial interest rates between two revolutions, 1688–1789 Marc Flandreau, Christophe Galimard, Clemens Jobst and Pilar Nogues Marco
    7. Comparing the UK and US financial systems, 1790–1830 Richard Sylla
    8. Natural experiments in financial reform in the nineteenth century, the Davis and Gallman analysis Larry Neal
    9. Regulatory changes and the development of the US banking market, 1870–1914: a study of profit rates and risk in national banks Richard J. Sullivan
    10. Anticipating the stock market crash of 1929: the view from the floor of the stock exchange Eugene N. White
    11. The development of 'non-traditional' open market operations: lessons from FDR's Silver Purchase Program Richard C. K. Burdekin and Marc D. Weidenmier
    12. The interwar shocks to US-Cuban trade relations: a view through sugar company stock price data Alan Dye and Richard Sicotte
    13. Central Bank reaction functions during the inter-war Gold Standard: a view from the periphery Kirsten Wandschneider
    14. Monetary policy and equity price booms: historical cross-country evidence Michael Bordo and David Wheelock
    15. Lessons from history for the twenty-first century Larry Neal
    Index.

  • Editors

    Jeremy Atack, Vanderbilt University, Tennessee

    Larry Neal, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    Contributors

    Jeremy Atack, Stephen Quinn, William Roberds, Oscar Gelderblom, Joost Jonker, François R. Velde, Gary S. Shea, Marc Flandreau, Christophe Galimard, Clemens Jobst, Pilar Nogues Marco, Richard Sylla, Larry Neal, Richard J. Sullivan, Eugene N. White, Richard C. K. Burdekin, Marc D. Weidenmier, Alan Dye, Richard Sicotte, Kirsten Wandschneider, Michael Bordo, David Wheelock

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