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The Rise of Fiscal States
A Global History, 1500–1914

$144.00 (C)

Bartolomé Yun-Casalilla, Wantje Fritschy, Marjolein 't Hart, Edwin Horlings, Paul Janssens, Richard Bonney, Martin Daunton, Michael North, Renate Pieper, Peter Gatrell, Eugenia Mata, Francisco Comín Comín, Luciano Pezzolo, Fausto Piola Caselli, Şevket Pamuk, Kent Deng, R. Bin Wong, Masaki Nakabayashi, John F. Richards, Patrick K. O'Brien
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  • Date Published: June 2012
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107013513

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  • From the Netherlands to the Ottoman Empire, to Japan and India, this groundbreaking volume confronts the complex and diverse problem of the formation of fiscal states in Eurasia between 1500 and 1914. This series of country case studies from leading economic historians reveals that distinctive features of the fiscal state appeared across the region at different moments in time as a result of multiple independent but often interacting stimuli such as internal competition over resources, European expansion, international trade, globalisation and war. The essays offer a comparative framework for re-examining the causes of economic development across this period and show, for instance, the central role that the more effective fiscal systems of Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries played in the divergence of east and west as well as the very different paths to modernisation taken across the world.

    • Covers developments throughout Eurasia revealing the multiple trajectories for the rise of fiscal states
    • Includes contributions from more than eighteen leading regional experts
    • A major contribution to current debates in comparative global history
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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2012
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107013513
    • length: 494 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 27 mm
    • weight: 0.83kg
    • contains: 41 b/w illus. 52 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction: the rise of the fiscal state in Eurasia from a global, comparative and transnational perspective BARTOLOMÉ Yun-Casalilla
    Part I. North Atlantic Europe:
    2. Long-term trends in the fiscal history of the Netherlands, 1515–1913 Wantje Fritschy, MARJOLEIN 't Hart and Edwin Horlings
    3. Taxation in the Habsburg Low Countries and Belgium, 1579–1914 Paul Janssens
    4. The rise of the fiscal state in France, 1500–1914 Richard Bonney
    5. The politics of British taxation, from the Glorious Revolution to the Great War Martin Daunton
    Part II. Central and Eastern Europe:
    6. Finances and power in the German state system Michael North
    7. Financing an empire: the Austrian composite monarchy, 1650–1848 Renate Pieper
    8. The Russian fiscal state, 1600–1914 Peter Gatrell
    Part III. South Atlantic Europe and the Mediterranean:
    9. From pioneer mercantile state to ordinary fiscal state: Portugal, 1498–1914 EUGENIA MATA
    10. Spain: from composite monarchy to nation state, 1492–1914. An exceptional case? FRANCISCO Comín Comín and Bartolomé Yun-Casalilla
    11. Republics and principalities in Italy Luciano Pezzolo
    12. The formation of fiscal states in Italy: the Papal States Fausto Piola Caselli
    13. The evolution of fiscal institutions in the Ottoman empire, 1500–1914 Şevket Pamuk
    Part IV. Asia:
    14. Continuation and efficiency of the Chinese fiscal state, 700 BC–1911 AD Kent Deng
    15. Taxation and good governance in China, 1500–1914 R. Bin Wong
    16. The rise of a Japanese fiscal state Masaki Nakabayashi
    17. Fiscal states in Mughal and British India John F. Richards
    18. Afterword: reflexions on fiscal foundations and contexts for the formation of economically effective Eurasian states from the rise of Venice to the Opium War Patrick K. O'Brien.

  • Editors

    Bartolomé Yun-Casalilla, European University Institute, Florence
    Bartolomé Yun-Casalilla is Professor of Early Modern History at the Universidad Pablo de Olavide in Seville, Spain and Head of the Department of History and Civilisation at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy.

    Patrick K. O'Brien, London School of Economics and Political Science
    Patrick K. O'Brien is Professor of Global Economic History at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Convenor of a European Research Council Programme on 'Regimes for the Production and Diffusion of Useful and Reliable Knowledge in the East and the West' (URKEW).

    With

    Francisco Comín Comín, Universidad de Alcalá, Madrid

    Contributors

    Bartolomé Yun-Casalilla, Wantje Fritschy, Marjolein 't Hart, Edwin Horlings, Paul Janssens, Richard Bonney, Martin Daunton, Michael North, Renate Pieper, Peter Gatrell, Eugenia Mata, Francisco Comín Comín, Luciano Pezzolo, Fausto Piola Caselli, Şevket Pamuk, Kent Deng, R. Bin Wong, Masaki Nakabayashi, John F. Richards, Patrick K. O'Brien

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