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Look Inside Monarchy, Myth, and Material Culture in Germany 1750–1950

Monarchy, Myth, and Material Culture in Germany 1750–1950

$36.99 (C)

Part of New Studies in European History

  • Author: Eva Giloi, Rutgers University, New Jersey
  • Date Published: January 2014
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107675407

$ 36.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • This innovative book illuminates popular attitudes toward political authority and monarchy in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Prussia, and twentieth-century Germany. In a fascinating study of how subjects incorporated the material culture of monarchy into their daily lives, Eva Giloi provides insights into German mentalities toward sovereign power. She examines how ordinary people collected and consumed relics and other royal memorabilia, and used these objects to articulate, validate, appropriate, or reject the state's political myths. The book reveals that the social practices that guided the circulation of material culture – under what circumstances it was acceptable to buy and sell the queen's underwear, for instance – expose popular assumptions about the Crown that were often left unspoken. The book sets loyalism in the everyday context of consumerism and commodification, changes in visual culture and technology, and the emergence of mass media and celebrity culture, to uncover a self-possessed, assertive German middle class.

    • Uses an innovative range of sources to illuminate popular attitudes to German politics and culture during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries
    • Provides insights into the tensions between royal power and democratization in German culture, which culminated in the descent into World War I
    • Essential reading for scholars of cultural history, gender studies and museum studies as well as German and wider European history
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This important book presents a new understanding of popular ideas about the Prussian royal family. Giloi’s nuanced findings shed light on attitudes toward consumption, material cultures of the nineteenth century, and everyday life over a period from the 1700s to the early twentieth century." -Lisa Fetheringill Zwicker, The Journal of Modern History

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2014
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107675407
    • length: 452 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 23 mm
    • weight: 0.6kg
    • contains: 35 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction: the material culture of monarchy
    2. Collecting royal relics, 1750s–1850s: means, motives, and meaning
    3. Relics under Friedrich Wilhelm III, 1797–1830
    4. Entr'acte: culture and power - a long-term outlook
    5. Frederick the Great in the Vormärz: relics and myth, 1830s–1840s
    6. The Neues museum, 1850s–1870s: relics in retreat
    7. Wilhelm I: relics and myth
    8. Consumerism and the gift-giving economy
    9. The Hohenzollern museum
    10. Image as object: the carte-de-visite photograph as souvenir
    11. Wilhelm II and the Hohenzollern legacy: the Kaiser takes charge
    12. The fragmentation of a myth after 1888
    13. Conclusion and epilogue: the success of a dynasty?

  • Author

    Eva Giloi, Rutgers University, New Jersey
    Eva Giloi is Assistant Professor in the History Department at Rutgers University, Newark.

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