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The Power of Oratory in the Medieval Muslim World

The Power of Oratory in the Medieval Muslim World

$108.00 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization

  • Date Published: August 2012
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107023055

$ 108.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Oratory and sermons had a fixed place in the religious and civic rituals of pre-modern Muslim societies and were indispensible for transmitting religious knowledge, legitimizing or challenging rulers, and inculcating the moral values associated with being part of the Muslim community. While there has been abundant scholarship on medieval Christian and Jewish preaching, Linda G. Jones's book is the first to consider the significance of the tradition of pulpit oratory in the medieval Islamic world. Traversing Iberia and North Africa from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries, the book analyzes the power of oratory, the ritual juridical and rhetorical features of pre-modern sermons, and the social profiles of the preachers and orators who delivered them. The biographical and historical sources, which form the basis of this remarkable study, offer abundant proof of cultural exchange between al-Andalus and the eastern regions of the Islamic empires, as preachers traveled back and forth between the great cities of Cordoba, Qayrawan, Baghdad, and Cairo. In this way, the book sheds light on different regional practices and the juridical debates between individual preachers around correct performance.

    • The first book to explore the tradition of oratory in the medieval Muslim world from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries
    • The sources reveal cross-cultural exchanges between preachers from Iberia to the eastern regions of the empire
    • A remarkable study which will contribute to knowledge about religious, theological and social practices in medieval Islam
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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2012
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107023055
    • length: 3108 pages
    • dimensions: 233 x 160 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.54kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. Laying the foundations
    2. The khutba: the 'central jewel' of medieval Arab-Islamic prose
    3. The khutba: rhetorical and discursive strategies of persuasion
    4. Putting it all together: the khutba, texts, and contexts
    Part I. Canonical Questions:
    5. Putting it all together: the khutba, texts, and contexts
    Part II. Thematic and Occasional Orations:
    6. Homiletic exhortation and storytelling: challenging the 'popular'
    7. 'The good eloquent speaker': profiles of pre-modern Muslim preachers
    8. The audience responds: participation, reception, contestation
    Conclusion.

  • Author

    Linda G. Jones, Universitat de Barcelona
    Linda G. Jones is Visiting Professor of History of Religions at the University of Barcelona. She is the co-author with Madeline Pelner Cosman of the Handbook to Life in the Medieval World (2007) and has been published in many journals, including The Bulletin of Middle East Medievalists, al-Qantara, Anuario de Estudios Medievales, Medieval Sermon Studies and Religion.

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